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Full text of "Boston College bulletin"

BOSTON 

COLLEGE 



2002-2003 




EVER TO EXCEL 



Boston College 
Chestnut Hill 
Massachusetts 02467 
617-552-8000 

Boston College Bulletin 2002-2003 

Volume LXXII, Number 15, April 2002 

The Boston College Bulletin contains current information regarding the University 
calendar, admissions, degree requirements, fees, regulations and course offerings. It is 
not intended to be and should not be relied upon as a statement of the University's 
contractual undertakings. 

Boston College reserves the right in its sole judgment to make changes of any 
nature in its program, calendar or academic schedule whenever it is deemed necessary 
or desirable, including changes in course content, the rescheduling of classes with or 
without extending the academic term, cancelling of scheduled classes and other acade- 
mic activities, and requiring or affording alternatives for scheduled classes or other 
academic activities, in any such case giving such notice thereof as is reasonably practica- 
ble under the circumstances. 

The Boston College Bulletin is published six times a year in April, May, August, 
September; semi-monthly in July. 

Boston College is committed to providing equal opportunity in education and in 
employment regardless of race, sex, marital or parental status, religion, age, national 
origin or physical/mental handicap. As an employer, Boston College is in compliance 
with the various laws and regulations requiring equal opportunity and affirmative 
action in employment, such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and Federal Executive 
Order #11246. Boston College's policy of equal educational opportunity is in compli- 
ance with the guidelines and requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act, Title IX 
of the Higher Education Amendments Act of 1972, and Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 

USPS-389-750 

Periodicals postage paid at Boston, Massachusetts 02109. 

Postmaster: Send PS Form 3579 to Boston College Office of Student Services, 

Lyons Hall, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467-3804. 



© Copyright 2002 Trustees of Boston College 



Table of Contents 

About Boston College 

Introduction 5 

The University 5 

Mission Statement 5 

Brief History of Boston College 5 

Accreditation of the University 6 

The Campus 6 

Academic Resources 6 

Academic Development Center 6 

Center for Media and Instructional Technology 6 

Language Laboratory 6 

Student Learning and Support Computing Facility 7 

The Libraries 7 

Art and Performance 8 

University Research Institutes and Centers 8 

Student Life Resources 11 

Office of Services for Students with Disabilities 12 

Inspection of Education Records 13 

Confidentiality of Student Records 14 

Enrollment Statistics and Graduation Rate 14 

Notice of Information Disclosures 14 

Notice of Non-Discrimination 15 

Residence Accommodations 15 

Tuition and Fees 16 

Massachusetts Medical Insurance 17 

National Student Loan Clearinghouse 19 

The University: Policies and Procedures 

Undergraduate Admission 20 

Financial Aid 22 

University Core Requirements 23 

First Year Experience 24 

Special Programs 24 

Academic Integrity 30 

Academic Regulations 32 

University (Senior) Awards and Honors 40 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Undergraduate College of Arts and Sciences 

Interdisciplinary Minors 43 

Special Academic Programs 46 

Departments and Programs 50 

Biochemistry 50 

Biology 51 

Black Studies 61 

Chemistry 63 

Classical Studies 68 

Communication 71 

Computer Science 77 

Economics 79 

English 86 

Fine Arts 103 

Art History 104 

Film Studies 104 

Studio Art 105 

Geology and Geophysics 113 

German Studies 123 



History 125 

Honors Program 141 

International Studies 143 

Mathematics 144 

Music 150 

Philosophy 156 

Physics 164 

Political Science 170 

Psychology 177 

Romance Languages and Literatures 191 

French 192 

Hispanic Studies 192 

Italian 192 

Slavic and Eastern Languages 203 

Sociology 209 

Theatre 216 

Theology 220 

University Courses 234 

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 

Master's Degree Programs 47 

M.A. and M.S. Requirements 47 

Special Programs 48 

Dual Degree Programs 48 

Doctoral Degree Programs 48 

Ph.D. Requirements 48 

Special Students 48 

Admission 48 

Financial Aid 49 

Graduate Programs 

Biology 54 

Chemistry 64 

Classical Studies 69 

Economics 81 

English 89 

Fine Arts 106 

Geology and Geophysics 116 

German Studies 123 

History 127 

Mathematics 146 

Philosophy 158 

Physics 168 

Political Science 171 

Psychology 179 

Institute of Religious Education and 

Pastoral Ministry 186 

Romance Languages and Literatures 194 

Slavic and Eastern Languages 205 

Sociology 210 

Theology 223 

Lynch School of Education 

Undergraduate Lynch School of Education 

Introduction 239 

Requirements for the Degree 239 

Academic Honors 240 

Majors in Education 240 

Major in Early Childhood Education 241 

The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



Table of Contents 



Major in Elementary Education 241 

Major in Secondary Education 241 

Middle School Licensure 241 

Major in Human Development 241 

Second Majors and Interdisciplinary Majors for 

LSOE Students 242 

Interdisciplinary Majors 242 

Child in Society 242 

Mathematics/Computer Science 242 

Human Development 242 

American Heritages 242 

Perspectives on Spanish America 242 

General Science 242 

Minors in the Lynch School of Education 242 

Minors for LSOE Students 242 

Minor in Special Education 242 

Minor in Health Science 242 

Minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching 242 

Minor in Organization Studies-Human 

Resources Management 243 

Minors for College of Arts and Sciences Majors 243 

Minor in Secondary Education for Students in the 

College of Arts and Sciences 243 

Minor in Health Science 243 

Minor in General Education 243 

Minors for CSOM Majors 243 

Minor in Human Development for CSOM Majors .243 

Minor in Health Science 243 

Minor in General Education 243 

Minors for School of Nursing Majors 243 

Minors for LSOE, CSON, A&S, and CSOM Majors 243 

Minor in Health Science 243 

Minors for CSON, A&S, and CSOM Majors 244 

Minor in General Education 244 

Fifth Year Programs 244 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 256 

Lynch School of Education Graduate Programs 

Introduction 244 

Policies and Procedures 244 

Degree Programs 246 

Doctoral Degree Programs 246 

Certificate of Advanced Educational Specialization 246 

Master's Degree Programs 246 

Research Centers 247 

Department of Teacher Education, Special Education 

and Curriculum & Instruction 247 

Programs in Teacher Education, Special Education & 

Curriculum and Instruction 248 

Department of Educational Administration and 

Higher Education 250 

Programs in Educational Administration 250 

Programs in Higher Education 251 

Department of Counseling, Developmental and 

Educational Psychology 251 

Programs in Counseling Psychology 251 



Programs in Applied Developmental and Educational 

Psychology 253 

Department of Educational Research, Measurement and 

Evaluation 254 

Lynch School of Education Summary of Graduate 

Program and Degree Offerings 254 

Faculty 254 

Graduate Course Offerings 262 

Law School 

Introduction 275 

Registration for Bar Examination 275 

Auditors 275 

Advanced Standing 275 

Dual Degree Program in Law and 

Business Administration 275 

Dual Degree Program in Law and Social Work 275 

Dual Degree Program in Law and Education 275 

London Program 275 

Information 276 

Faculty 276 

Carroll School of Management 

Undergraduate Carroll School of Management 

Mission Statement 277 

Special Programs 278 

Management Honors Program 278 

Pre-Professional Studies for Law 278 

The Ethics Initiative 278 

Concentrations and Programs 

Accounting 283 

Business Law 286 

Computer Science 287 

Economics 291 

Finance 291 

General Management 296 

Honors Program 297 

Marketing 297 

Operations and Strategic Management 300 

Organizational Studies — Human Resources 
Management 306 

Carroll School of Management Graduate Programs 

Introduction 278 

Master of Business Administration Program 278 

M.B.A. Curriculum 279 

Dual Degree Programs 279 

Master of Science in Finance 280 

Ph.D. in Management with Concentration in Finance ....280 
Ph.D. in Management with Concentration in 

Organization Studies 280 

Admission Information 281 

Financial Assistance 282 

Career Services 282 

Accreditation 282 

For More Information 282 

Graduate Course Offerings 

Graduate Management Practice/International 282 

Accounting 285 

3~ 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



Table of Contents 



Business Law 287 

Computer Science 291 

Finance 294 

Marketing 299 

Operations and Strategic Management 303 

Organizational Studies-Human Resources 
Management 308 

Connell School of Nursing 

Connell Undergraduate School of Nursing 

Plan of Study 310 

Academic Honors 311 

General Information 311 

Faculty 316 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 316 

Connell Graduate School of Nursing 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree Program 312 

Program of Study 312 

Master of Science Degree Program 313 

Program of Study 315 

General Information 315 

Faculty 316 

Graduate Course Offerings 319 

Graduate School of Social Work 

Professional Program: Master's Level 326 

Dual Degree Programs 327 

Professional Program: Doctoral Level 327 

Continuing Education 328 

Information 328 

Faculty 328 

Course Offerings 329 

College of Advancing Studies 

Undergraduate Degree Program 338 

Graduate Degree Program 339 

Summer Session 340 

Administration and Faculty 341 

Academic Calendar 2002-2003 344 

Directory and Office Locations 345 

Campus Maps 347 

Index 348 



4 The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



About Boston College 



About Boston College 

Introduction 

The University 

From its beginnings in 1863 as a small Jesuit college for boys in 
Boston's South End, Boston College has grown into a national insti- 
tution of higher learning that is regularly listed among the top 40 
universities in the nation, in ratings compiled by publications such 
as Barron's and U. S. News and World Report. 

The University, now located in the Boston suburb of Chestnut 
HUl, Massachusetts, enrolls 9,000 full-time undergraduates and 4,510 
graduate students, hailing from all 50 states and more than 80 foreign 
countries. Boston College offers its diverse student body state-of-the- 
art fecilities for learning: a full range of computer services including on- 
line access to databases in business, economics, social sciences and law, 
and a library system with over 2 million books, periodicals and gov- 
ernment documents, and more than 3.4 million microform units. 

Boston College awards bachelors and graduate degrees in more 
than 50 subjects and interdisciplinary areas within the College of Arts 
and Sciences, as well as undergraduate and graduate degrees from three 
professional schools: the Wallace E. Carroll School of Management, 
founded in 1938; the William F. Connell School of Nursing, founded 
in 1947; and the Carolyn A. and Peter S. Lynch School of Education, 
founded in 1952. Boston College also awards masters and doctoral 
degrees from the Graduate School of Social Work, and the Juris Doctor 
from Boston College Law School, which is consistently ranked among 
the top 25 law schools in the United States. 

The Mission of Boston College 

Strengthened by more than a century and a quarter of dedica- 
tion to academic excellence, Boston College commits itself to the 
highest standards of teaching and research in undergraduate, gradu- 
ate and professional programs and to the pursuit of a just society 
through its own accomplishments, the work of its faculty and staff, 
and the achievements of its graduates. It seeks both to advance its 
place among the nation's finest universities and to bring to the com- 
pany of its distinguished peers and to contemporary society the rich- 
ness of the Catholic intellectual ideal of a mutually illuminating rela- 
tionship between religious faith and free intellectual inquiry. 

Boston College draws inspiration for its academic and societal 
mission from its distinctive religious tradition. As a Catholic and 
Jesuit university, it is rooted in a world view that encounters God in 
all creation and through all human activity, especially in the search 
for truth in every discipline, in the desire to learn, and in the call to 
live justly together. In this spirit, the University regards the contri- 
bution of different religious traditions and value systems as essential 
to the fullness of its intellectual life and to the continuous develop- 
ment of its distinctive intellectual heritage. Boston College pursues 
this distinctive mission by serving society in three ways: 

• by fostering the rigorous intellectual development and the 
religious, ethical and personal formation of its undergraduate, 
graduate and professional students in order to prepare them 
for citizenship, service and leadership in a global society 

• by producing significant national and international research 
that advances insight and understanding, thereby both enrich- 
ing culture and addressing important societal needs 

• by committing itself to advance the dialogue between reli- 
gious belief and other formative elements of culture through 
the intellectual inquiry, teaching and learning, and the com- 
munity life that form the University. 



Boston College fulfills this mission with a deep concern for all 
members of its community, with a recognition of the important con- 
tribution a diverse student body, faculty and staff can offer, with a firm 
commitment to academic freedom, and with a determination to exer- 
cise careful stewardship of its resources in pursuit of its academic goals. 

Brief History of Boston College 

Boston College was founded by the Society of Jesus in 1863 and 
is one of twenty-eight Jesuit colleges and universities in the United 
States. The founder, Father John McElroy, was thwarted for some years 
by Protestant opposition to his attempt to establish a church and col- 
lege on property near the North Station. Property was acquired in the 
South End in 1859, a college charter granted by the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts in 1863, and, with three teachers and twenty-two stu- 
dents, the school opened its doors on September 5, 1864. The first 
president was Father John Bapst, a native of Switzerland. 

The first dean was Father Robert Fulton, who served twice as 
president (1870-1880, 1888-1891). When he was president he also 
held the office of dean, so he was the formative influence on the 
College in the nineteenth century. At the outset and for more than 
seven decades of its first century, the college remained an exclusively 
liberal arts institution with emphasis on the Greek and Latin classics, 
English and modern languages, and with more attention to philoso- 
phy than to the physical or social sciences. Religion of course had its 
place in the classroom as well as in the nonacademic life of the college. 

Originally located on Harrison Avenue in the South End of 
Boston, where it shared quarters with the Boston College High 
School, the College outgrew its urban setting toward the end of its 
first fifty years. A new location was selected in Chestnut Hill, then 
almost rural, and four parcels of land were acquired in 1907 by 
Father Thomas Gasson, who became president that year. A design 
competition for the development of the campus was won by the firm 
of Maginnis and Walsh, and ground was broken on June 19, 1909, 
for the construction of Gasson Hall. It is located on the site of the 
Lawrence farmhouse, in the center of the original tract of land pur- 
chased by Father Gasson, and is built largely of stone taken from the 
surrounding property. 

Later purchases doubled the size of the property, with the addi- 
tion of the upper campus in 1941, and the lower campus with the 
purchase of the Lawrence Basin and adjoining land in 1949. In 1974 
Boston College acquired Newton College of the Sacred Heart, a mile- 
and-a-half from the main campus. With sixteen buildings standing 
on forty acres, it is now the site of the Boston College Law School and 
dormitories housing over 800 students, primarily freshmen. 

Though incorporated as a University since its beginning, it was 
not until its second half-century that Boston College began to fill out 
the dimensions of its University charter. The Summer Session was 
inaugurated in 1 924; the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences in 
1925; the Law School in 1929; the Evening College (now the College 
of Advancing Studies), 1929; the Graduate School of Social Work, 
1936; the College of Business Administration, 1938. The latter, along 
with its Graduate School established in 1957, is now known as the 
Wallace E. Carroll School of Management. The Connell School of 
Nursing and the Carolyn A. and Peter S. Lynch School of Education 
were founded in 1947 and 1952, respectively. Weston Observatory, 
founded in 1928, was accepted as a Department of Boston College in 
1947, offering courses in geophysics and geology. 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences began programs at 
the doctoral level in 1952. Now courses leading to the doctorate are 
offered by thirteen Arts and Sciences departments. The Schools of 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



About Boston College 



Education and Nursing, the Carroll Graduate School of 
Management, and the Graduate School of Social Work also offer 
doctoral programs. 

In 1 927 Boston College conferred one earned bachelor's degree 
and fifteen master's degrees on women through the Extension 
Division, the precursor of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, 
the Evening College, and the Summer Session. By 1970 all under- 
graduate programs had become coeducational. Today women stu- 
dents comprise more than half of the University's enrollment. 

Up to 1970 the president of Boston College was also rector of 
the Jesuit community, appointed by the Father General of the 
Society of Jesus. By canon law a rector served only a six year term, 
though rare exceptions extended that limit, as in the cases of Father 
Fulton and Father Michael Walsh (1958-1968). Father J. Donald 
Monan, the twenty-fourth president, elected in 1972, was the first 
not to be rector of the Jesuit community, hence free from the six-year 
limitation in office. He served for twenty-four years, which proved 
to be a golden era in the University's history. In July 1996 Father 
William P. Leahy succeeded Father Monan as president. Father 
Leahy is the latest chief officer of an institution that in academic 
prestige, in applications to undergraduate and graduate programs, in 
financial stability and strength, and in efficient management has 
reached an elite position in American higher education. 

Accreditation of the University 

Boston College is a member of or accredited by, the following 
educational institutions: The American Association of Colleges of 
Nursing, the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education, 
the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business, the American 
Association of University Women, the American Bar Association, the 
American Chemical Society, the American Council on Education, the 
American Psychological Association, the Association of American 
Colleges, the Association of American Law Schools, the Association for 
Continuing Higher Education, the Association of Urban Universities, 
the Board of Regents of the University of New York, the College 
Entrance Examination Board, the Council of Graduate Schools, the 
Council on Social Work Education, the Association of Jesuit Colleges 
and Universities, the Institute of European Studies, the Institute of Asian 
Studies, the International Association of Universities, the International 
Association of Catholic Universities, the Interstate Certification 
Compact, the National Catholic Education Association, the National 
League for Nursing, the New England Association of Schools and 
Colleges, the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education, 
Phi Beta Kappa, Alpha Sigma Nu, and other similar organizations. 

The Campus 

Located on the border between the city of Boston and the sub- 
urb of Newton, Boston College derives benefits from its proximity 
to a large metropolitan city and its setting in a residential suburb. 
Often cited as a model of university planning, the campus is spread 
over more than 200 acres of tree-covered Chestnut Hill. Yet it is just 
a few miles from culturally and socially rich Boston. 

The Chestnut Hill campus is tri-level. Dormitories are on the 
upper campus; classroom, laboratory, administrative, and student ser- 
vice facilities are on the middle campus; and the lower campus 
includes the Robsham Theatre, the Conte Forum, modular and apart- 
ment residences as well as dining, recreational, and parking facilities. 

The Newton campus is situated one and one-half miles from 
the Chestnut Hill campus. The Law School is located on this easily 
accessible 40-acre tract that also contains undergraduate classrooms, 
dormitories, athletic areas, and student service facilities. 



Academic Resources 

Academic Development Center 

The Academic Development Center (ADC) is designed to sup- 
port and enhance academic excellence by helping undergraduates, 
graduate students, and faculty improve learning quality and teaching 
effectiveness. The ADC, which opened its doors in September 1991, 
is located on the second floor of O'Neill Library, in the Eileen M. 
and John M. Connors Learning Center. 

The Academic Development Center is a comprehensive, inclu- 
sive resource serving all BC students at no charge. The Center pro- 
vides tutoring for more than 60 courses in mathematics, physical 
and life sciences, management, social work, nursing, social sciences, 
history, philosophy, and classical and foreign languages. The ADC 
also offers workshops in study skills and learning strategies. In addi- 
tion, graduate tutors in English help students strengthen their acad- 
emic writing skills. These services are available throughout the regu- 
lar academic year and during summer school. All ADC tutors have 
been recommended by their relevant academic departments; most 
are graduate students or outstanding upper-division students. 

The ADC offers programs designed to challenge the most aca- 
demically talented, highest achieving students, as well as programs 
designed to support those who are least prepared and most academ- 
ically challenged. One member of ADC's full-time professional staff 
provides academic support services for students with learning dis- 
abilities, helping to ensure their success at Boston College. Working 
closely with the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, the ADC 
sponsors seminars, workshops, and discussions for graduate teaching 
assistants (TAs) and teaching fellows (TFs) on strategies for improv- 
ing teaching effectiveness and student learning. Each fall, the ADC 
and Graduate School of Arts and Science hold a two-day workshop 
to help TAs and TFs prepare for teaching. The ADC provides simi- 
lar instructional support services to BC's faculty. Through these and 
other related activities, the Academic Development Center plays an 
important role in enhancing the quality of academic life at Boston 
College. Call 617-552-8055 for further information. 

Center for Media and Instructional Technology 

University Center for Media and Instructional Technology 
(CMIT) provides media-related products and services to the Boston 
College community in order to enhance research, instruction, and 
support BC community events. 

These services include access to over thirty types of classroom 
audiovisual equipment, audioproduction services, film and video 
rentals, television recording and editing, photography, and graphic 
design and production. In addition — as part of project AGORA — 
CMIT operates BC's Cable Services which offers educational and 
commercial programming on its 57 cable TV channels to all student 
dormitories across campus. Several courses are also taught in AV's 
television studio where students use modern post-production editing 
equipment for their TV projects. 

Finally, CMIT offers instructional design expertise in order to 
make the link between modern technologies and teaching/learning. 

For more information, please visit http://www.bc.edu/cmit. 

Language Laboratory 

The Boston College Language Laboratory, serving all the lan- 
guage departments, students of English as a foreign language, and 
the Boston College community at large, is located in Lyons 313. In 
addition to its 32 listening/recording stations and teacher console, 
the facility includes 15 networked Macintosh workstations, 2 laser 
printers, a web server, a materials development workstation, 2 
TV/video viewing rooms, 2 individual carrels for TV/video viewing, 
and one CD listening station. The Lab's audio and videotape/ 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



About Boston College 



laserdisc collection, computer/multimedia software, other audio- 
visual learning aids, and print materials including mono- and bilin- 
gual dictionaries, as well as laboratory manuals for elementary 
through advanced language courses, directly support and/or supple- 
ment the curriculum requirements in international language, litera- 
ture, and music. 

The Lab's collection is designed to assist users in the acquisition 
and maintenance of aural comprehension, oral and written profi- 
ciency, and cultural awareness. Prominent among the Lab's offerings 
that directly address these goals are international news broadcasts 
and other television programming available through the Boston 
College cable television network and made accessible to lab users via 
EagleNET connections and/or via videotaped off-air recordings. 
These live or near-live broadcasts from around the world provide a 
timely resource for linguistic and cultural information in a wide vari- 
ety of languages. 

Students (undergraduate and graduate), faculty and BC commu- 
nity members who wish to use the Language Laboratory facility and 
its collection will find the Laboratory staff available during the day, in 
the evening, and on weekends to assist them in the operation of equip- 
ment and in the selection of appropriate materials for their course- 
related or personal language needs. For more information about the 
Language Laboratory, please visit http://www.bc.edu/langlab. 

Student Learning and Support Computing Facility 

(SLSC) 

The SLSC, located in O'Neill, room 250, is Boston College's 
main computer laboratory on campus. The facility holds 70 MACs, 
80 PCs, 2 color scanners, 4 e-mail stations, 2 music stations, 8 dock- 
ing stations for laptops, zip disk, floppy vending machines and 
VMS/Alpha access for use by the Boston College community. 
Within the facility, users have access to wide variety of software 
applications, high speed access to the Internet and notary services are 
provided by Maria Koufos. 

Students rely on the SLSC for the wealth of software main- 
tained by our monitoring of academic departmental needs, as well as 
word processing, spreadsheet, statistical analysis, programming lan- 
guages, graphics production, and database management software. 
Students can visit the SLSC on the web at http://www.bc.edu/slsc 
for a complete listing of the latest versions of software. 

The SLSC houses nine laser printers for printing and is staffed 
with professionals and students who provide assistance. Training tuto- 
rials and software documentation are available within the facility, as 
well as a wealth of resources available at http://www.bc.edu/infotech. 

More specialized assistance is provided at the Help Desk for 
students in O'Neill 250, on a walk-in, phone-in, or e-mail basis. Dial 
617-552-HELP for assistance or an appointment. Users can sign in 
on the new File-Maker Pro database for Help Desk assistance. 

The SLSC instructional lab is available for faculty and department 
to use for computer based courses. The lab is booked most of the year. 
We also feature computer classes for students in Excel, PowerPoint, and 
Flash. The SLSC is open 8:00 A.M.-midnight Monday through 
Thursday, 8:00 A.M.-7:00 EM., Friday, 9:00 A.M.-5:00 EM. Saturday 
and noon-midnight on Sunday. For extended hours and classes, please 
refer to the SLSC website, http://www.bc.edu/slsc 

The Libraries 

The Boston College Libraries offer a wealth of resources and 
services to support the teaching and research activities of the 
University. The book collection has reached 1,858, 113 volumes and 
21,296 serial titles are currently received. The Libraries offer access 
to hundreds of databases via the web and in CD-ROM format. A 
growing number of these databases and journals provide full text 



access directly to the researcher's desktop. A complete listing of all 
online databases available can be found by selecting Online 
Databases on the Libraries' home page at http://www.bc.edu/ 
libraries.html. Databases range in coverage from very general to very 
specific and cover a wide range of research areas in the humanities, 
social sciences, sciences, health sciences, business, law and public 
affairs. An expanding number of links to thousands of electronic 
journals may also be found by the using the Libraries' home page. 

The Libraries migrated to a new web-based, state-of-the-art 
integrated library system in June 2000. The new system, which uses 
Oracle as the underlying database engine, is a client/server system 
with open architecture, allowing transparent interfaces with other 
systems and databases. It provides users with expanded access to the 
Libraries' extensive collections, databases, and services. The web 
interface, QUEST (http://www.bc.edu/quest), offers a variety of 
methods for locating and requesting books, periodicals, media mate- 
rials, microforms, newspapers, and electronic resources. The system 
is accessible 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, from any location, using 
a standard web browser. QUEST also provides users with the ability 
to check their library circulation record, renew materials online, and 
check on the status of outstanding requests they may have. The web 
interface and expanded indexing and retrieval options provide users 
with unprecedented access to both print and electronic resources, 
including local digital collections such as the Liturgy and Life 
Collection of the John J. Burns Library, as well as more than 200 
databases, 3,500 cataloged web resources, and thousands of web- 
based electronic journals. 

In October 2000, the Libraries became the 112th member of 
the Association of Research Libraries. ARL is a non-profit member- 
ship organization comprising the leading research libraries in North 
America. 

Membership on two academic consortia, the Boston Library 
Consortium and the Boston Theological Institute, adds still greater 
dimensions to the resource of the Boston College Libraries, providing 
faculty and students who have special research needs access to the 
millions of volumes and other services of the member institutions. 

The O'Neill Library, opened in 1984 and named for former 
speaker of the U.S. House of Representative, Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. 
'36, is the central research library of the University and is located on 
the main campus. Collections include approximately 1.4 million 
volumes on a broad range of subjects reflecting the University's 
extensive curriculum. Access to QUEST the Libraries' online cata- 
log, multiple databases and other local and remote resources is pro- 
vided via more than 60 workstations in the O'Neill Library. 
Individual study spaces are available throughout with both net- 
worked connections in some areas and wireless connections 
throughout the Library. 

The Resource Center, located in the lower level of the Trinity 
Chapel and open when classes are in session, provides study space for 
the residents of the Newton Campus as well as PC and Macintosh 
workstations. 

The Social Work Library in McGuinn Hall contains a collec- 
tion of over 35,000 volumes, 360 serials, social work theses, doctor- 
al dissertations, and videotapes. The collection covers the history 
and philosophy of social work, its methodology, and all aspects of 
social welfare services. The Library's collections and services support 
the master's and doctoral programs offered at the Chestnut Hill cam- 
pus, and master's programs offered at four off-campus sites through- 
out Massachusetts and Maine. 

The Law School Library, located on the Newton Campus, has 
a collection of approximately 411,000 volumes of legal and related 
materials in a variety of media, most of which are non-circulating. It 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



7 



About Boston College 



includes primary source materials consisting of reports of decisions 
and statutory materials with a broad collection of secondary research 
materials in the form of textbooks and treatises, legal and related 
periodicals, legal encyclopedias and related reference works. The 
library possesses substantial and growing collections of international 
and comparative law works. 

The Bapst Library, a beautiful collegiate Gothic building 
which served as the main library for over 50 years, has been restored 
to its original splendor and houses the resources for library research 
in art and art history. The Graduate Study and Research Space is 
located in the mezzanine of Kresge Reading Room. Gargan Hall, 
with its magnificent stained glass windows, provides for quiet study 
for all students and faculty. 

The John J. Burns Library of Rare Books and Special 
Collections houses over 150,000 volumes and more than 15 million 
manuscripts in a beautiful, secure and climate-controlled space. 
Holdings include unique, illuminated medieval manuscripts; exam- 
ples of the earliest printed books; the largest collection in America of 
Irish research materials, an integral part of Boston College's distin- 
guished Irish Programs, including original manuscripts of Nobel 
Prize winning authors William Butler Yeats, Samuel Beckett and 
Seamus Heaney; the libraries and archives of various British Catholic 
authors, including Graham Greene, Francis Thompson and Hilaire 
Belloc; the most comprehensive collection in America of books by 
and about Jesuits from their founding in 1540 to their Suppression 
in 1773; and the papers of distinguished political leaders, such as 
Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr., former Speaker of the U.S. House of 
Representatives, and Robert Drinan, S.J., the only Catholic priest 
ever to have served as a member of Congress. The Library also con- 
tains important collections on Jamaica, Judaica, West Africa, the 
Balkans, American Detective Fiction, the City of Boston, nursing, 
Boston Banking, and urban planning, including the papers of Jane 
Jacobs. The Burns Library is also home to the University's Archives 
and the Irish Music Center. The Library supports an ambitious exhi- 
bitions program, and hosts various lectures and programs to which 
the public is invited. Students and researchers are warmly encour- 
aged to visit and make use of these resources. 

The Irish Music Center documents the history of Irish music 
in America. Its archives include rare recordings, printed music, 
books, manuscripts, photographs and memorabilia. 

The University Archives are the official non-current papers 
and records of an institution that are deemed worthy of preservation 
for their legal, fiscal, or historical values. The University Archives, a 
department within the John J. Burns Library, contain the office 
records and documents of the various University offices, academic 
and otherwise, copies of all University publications, including stu- 
dent publications, movie footage of Boston College football, some 
audiovisual materials, and tape recordings of the University Lecture 
series and other significant events. 

A significant collection of photographs documents the pictori- 
al history of Boston College. Alumni, faculty, and Jesuit records are 
also preserved. In addition, the Archives are the repository for the 
documents of Newton College of the Sacred Heart (1946-1975); the 
Jesuit Education Association (1934-1970); the Catholic 
International Education Office (1952-1976); and the documents of 
the Jesuit community of Boston College (1863-). 

The Catherine B. O'Connor Geophysics Library, located at 
Weston Observatory, contains a specialized collection of over 8,000 
monographs and journals on earth sciences, particularly seismology. 

The Educational Resource Center, located in Campion Hall, 
is a state-of-the-art facility that serves the Lynch School of 
Education's faculty and students. The collection includes current ele- 



mentary and secondary textbooks, and teaching guides, pre K-12 
educational software, children's books including both fiction and 
non-fiction, curriculum guides (Kraus Curriculum Development 
Library), instructional aids, math and science manipulatives, educa- 
tional and psychological tests, and video and audiotapes. 

Art and Performance 

The cultural offerings on campus are a rich mix, ranging from 
classical to contemporary, presented by artists working alone and in 
company, in venues as casual as the McElroy coffee shop, as formal 
as Robsham Theater, as elegant as the McMuUen Museum of Art. 

Many events are spontaneous, comes-as-you-feel — a poetry slam 
in McElroy, a stand-up comic in the Rat, a French horn recital in Gasson 
Hall, but there are eight campus structures that support and promote 
most student art and performance in all their forms and variations. 

The E. Paul Robsham Theater Arts Center annually hosts 
dance and theater productions on its main stage, and many other per- 
formances in its studio workshops. Humanities Series has been 
bringing poets, novelists and critics to speak at Boston College since 
1957. McMullen Museum of Art features the permanent BC collec- 
tion as well as special exhibits of works from around the world. The 
Department of Fine Arts offers majors in studio art, art history, and 
film studies. The Music Department and the student-run Musical 
Guild sponsor free student and facidty concerts throughout the year. 
Boston College Bands Program sponsors concerts, festivals, and 
other events by its lineup of five bands: the "Screaming Eagles" 
Marching Band, the Pep Band, BC bOp!, the Swingin' Eagles Stage 
Band and the Community Concert Band. The Undergraduate 
Government of Boston College, a student group primarily elected to 
represent student views to the University, also sponsors concerts by 
contemporary artists in rock, rap, R&B and folk. The Boston College 
Chorale and the Boston College Symphony are also available. 

University Research Institutes and 
Centers 

Research is an important part of the intellectual life at Boston 
College. Faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduates 
collaborate in a range of research strategies across the disciplines and 
professional schools: laboratory studies; survey research; archival and 
textual research; theory development; field and basic research. In 
addition to the work of individual faculty and units, Boston College 
supports the collaborative work of faculty and students across the 
University through the following centers and institutes: 

Center for Child, Family, and Community 

Partnerships 

The Center for Child, Family, and Community Partnerships is 
an "outreach scholarship" program that fosters collaboration among 
Boston College faculty and students, and community leaders in health 
care, social service, economic development, and education. The goal 
of the participants is to create stronger, healthier, and more economi- 
cally sound communities. The Center, based at the Lynch School of 
Education, offers technical assistance, program evaluation, needs 
assessment, training, and consultation to community organizations. 

Center for Corporate Citizenship 

The Center for Corporate Citizenship provides leadership in 
establishing corporate citizenship as a business essential, so all compa- 
nies act as economic and social assets to the communities they impact 
by integrating social interests with other core business objectives. 
Through its research, executive education, consultation and conven- 
ings on issues of corporate citizenship, the Center is the leading orga- 
nization helping corporations define their role in the community. 



8 



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About Boston College 



The Center offers research and development on corporate citi- 
zenship; publications on corporate citizenship that include two 
newsletters, research reports, and white papers; executive education 
programs in corporate citizenship, including on-site and custom 
programs and a certificate program in corporate community rela- 
tions; consulting; convenings to bring together the many communi- 
ties invested in corporate citizenship, including the annual 
International Corporate Citizenship Conference, workshops, round- 
tables, and regional meetings; a corporate membership program; and 
a website that provides an online meeting place for the corporate cit- 
izenship community. 

Contact The Center for Corporate Citizenship at 617-552- 
4545, http://www.bc.edu/corporatecitizenship, or ccc@bc.edu. 

Center for East Europe, Russia, and Asia 

The Center's programs encourage faculty and students to par- 
ticipate in interdepartmental endeavors on both the graduate and 
undergraduate levels. Participating faculty come from the 
Departments of Fine Arts, History, Philosophy, Political Science, 
Slavic and Eastern Languages, and Theology and offer over eighty aca- 
demic courses connected with the study of the culture, history, and 
political life of East Europe, Russia, the Balkans, and Central Asia. 

Students may also earn a certificate of proficiency from the 
Center. Certificate requirements and other information on the oper- 
ation of the Center are available from the Directors, Cynthia 
Simmons (Slavic and Eastern Languages, Lyons 210) and Roberta 
Manning (History, Carney 165). 

Center for Ignatian Spirituality 

The Center for Ignatian Spirituality is a University operation 
that offers faculty and staff a resource to carry on the needed dia- 
logue between the values that constitute Boston College and the plu- 
ralism that characterizes our contemporary culture. The Center ini- 
tiates its own programs, inviting faculty and staff to pursue a partic- 
ular topic; sponsors retreats and reflection opportunities for faculty 
and staff; and has a wide range of national and international com- 
mitments to other institutions in their efforts to integrate Ignatian 
spirituality into their educational endeavors. For more information, 
please visit us at Rahner House, 96 College Road, or call 617-552- 
1777, or visit http://www.bc.edu/igspirit. 

Center for International Higher Education 

Established in 1995 and housed in the Lynch School of 
Education, the Center for International Higher Education (CIHE) 
is a research and service agency providing information, publications, 
and a sense of community to colleges and universities worldwide. 
The main focus of the Center is on academic institutions in the 
Jesuit tradition, but other universities receive its publications and are 
part of an informal network. There is a special concern with the 
needs of academic institutions in the developing countries of the 
Third World. 

Center activities include the publication of a quarterly newslet- 
ter dealing with the central concerns of higher education in an inter- 
national context; a book series on higher education; the maintenance 
of an international database of administrators, policy makers, and 
researchers in the field of higher education; and sponsorship of an 
international conference on higher education issues. Visiting schol- 
ars from Jesuit and other universities worldwide occasionally are in 
residence at the Center. CIHE works in conjunction with the 
Higher Education Program of the Lynch School. 

More information on the Center for International Higher 
Education can be found at http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/ soe/cihe. 



Center for Nursing Research 

The CNR's central purpose is to serve as an institutional 
resource for faculty and students in the Council School of Nursing, 
the Boston College community, and the greater Boston nursing and 
health care community. Three interrelated but separate goals support 
the purpose of the CNR: (1) to strengthen the research productivity 
of faculty in the Connell School of Nursing, (2) to increase intradis- 
ciplinary and interdisciplinary research and scholarship, and (3) to 
communicate research findings to facilitate research utilization in 
nursing practice and in educational settings. The Center serves as a 
repository for the Cathy J. Malek Research Collection as well as 
books and other materials related to quantitative and qualitative 
research methods, data analysis, grant-seeking and grant-writing. 

Center for Retirement Research 

The Center for Retirement Research at Boston College was 
established through a 5-year S5.25 million grant from the Social 
Security Administration in 1998. The goals of the Center are to pro- 
mote research on retirement issues, to transmit new findings to the 
policy community and the public, to help train new scholars, and to 
broaden access to valuable data sources. The Center is the head- 
quarters for researchers and experts in affiliated institutions includ- 
ing MIT, Syracuse University, the Brookings Institution, the Urban 
Institute, and the National Academy of Social Insurance. The Center 
is structured around an interdisciplinary research team with back- 
grounds in actuarial science, demography, economics, economic his- 
tory, finance, political science, sociology and social work. 

Since its creation, the Center has established itself as a dynam- 
ic research enterprise with a growing national reputation. The 
Center showcases its work through an array of publications, confer- 
ences, and special events. Publications include issue briefs designed 
for a general audience, as well as more technical papers for the 
research community. The Center's events include debates in Boston's 
financial district that are targeted to a business audience and an 
annual conference in Washington, D.C. that is co-sponsored with a 
parallel center at the University of Michigan. 

For more information on publications, events and financial sup- 
port programs, please visit the Center's website (http://www.bc.edu/crr), 
send an e-mail to crr@bc.edu, or call 617-552-1762. 

Center for the Study of Testing, Evaluation, and 
Educational Policy (CSTEEP) 

The Lynch School of Education houses the Center for the 
Study of Testing, Evaluation, and Educational Policy (CSTEEP), a 
University-supported research center internationally recognized for 
its work in the policy uses of tests. This research center is a rich 
resource for all programs in education. In the past decade, CSTEEP 
has been involved in assessment issues that address the fairness of 
testing in culturally and economically diverse populations. 

Among the projects conducted under the auspices of CSTEEP 
is the National Board on Educational Testing and Public Policy. Its 
web address is http://nbetpp.bc.edu/. 

CSTEEP has been joined by the Learning Communities 
Research Group, which specializes in research on technology in edu- 
cation. Its web address is http://learning.bc.edu. 

Further information on CSTEEP is available at http://www.csteep. 
bc.edu 

Center for Work and Family 

The Boston College Center for Work and Family is a research 
center of the Carroll School of Management. The Center is com- 
mitted to enhancing the quality of life of today's workforce by pro- 
viding leadership for the integration of work and life, an essential for 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



About Boston College 



business and community success. Our vision is that companies and 
communities will work together to ensure their mutual prosperity 
and the well being of employees and their families. The Center's ini- 
tiatives fall into three broad categories: research, workplace partner- 
ships, and professional development. 

• Research: The Center focuses attention on applied studies 
that contribute knowledge building, meet standards of rigor- 
ous research, and relate to practitioners. 

• Workplace Partnerships: The Center is home to two highly 
successful employer partnerships: the Work & Family 
Roundtable, established in 1990, and the New England Work 
Family Association, established in 1992. 

• Professional Development: Since 1998, the Center has been 
working collaboratively with the Alliance of Work/Life 
Professionals in an effort to define what it means to be a 
work/life professional. At the current time, four courses have 
been developed and are being taught by experienced work/life 
professionals. 

International Study Center 

The International Study Center at the Lynch School of 
Education is dedicated to conducting comparative studies in educa- 
tional achievement. Principally it serves as the center for interna- 
tional studies in mathematics, science, and reading — Trends in 
International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and Progress 
in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS). 

"TIMSS- 1999 Benchmarking: A Bridge to School Improve- 
ment" was the first study comparing students achievement in math 
and science at the 8th grade level among 13 states, 14 school districts 
and consortia, and 37 countries. The study was released in 2001 at 
a Washington, D.C., press conference. U.S. Secretary of Education 
Rod Paige and Rita Colwell, Director of the National Science 
Foundation, were among those participating in the press conference 
and praising the study 

PIRLS is the latest international assessment being conducted by 
the International Study Center. Approximately 40 countries are par- 
ticipating in this study, which measures reading literacy achievement 
of fourth-grade students (ages 9 and 1 0) and gathers information 
about home and school factors associated with learning to read. 

The International Study Center receives funding from such 
organizations as the International Association for the Evaluation of 
Educational Achievement, U.S. National Center for Education 
Statistics, and U.S. National Science Foundation. Its web address is 
http://timss.bc.edu 

Institute of Medieval Philosophy and Theology 

See description in the Theology Department. 

Institute for Scientific Research 

The Institute for Scientific Research (ISR) boasts a highly- 
trained team of scientists, engineers, and mathematicians. Over the 
course of its history, the Institute has utilized a diversity of knowl- 
edge to develop highly sophisticated techniques for analyzing raw 
scientific and engineering data and presenting it in meaningful and 
useful ways. Using state-of-the-art analytical tools and technology 
including computer-generated modeling, the Institute is a forerun- 
ner in scientific data analysis and interpretation using statistical data 
analysis, digital signal processing and image processing; mathemati- 
cal signal modeling; animated visualization of real and simulated 
data; the manipulation and interpretation of scientific images; and 
the design of specialized databases, data management techniques and 
interactive scientific software. 



Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and 
Culture (ISPRC) 

The Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture 
(ISPRC) was founded in 2000 at Boston College, under the direction 
of Dr. Janet E. Helms, to promote the assets and address the societal 
conflicts associated with race or culture in theory and research, men- 
tal health practice, education, business, and society at large. 

The ISPRC attempts to solicit, design, and disseminate effective 
interventions with a pro-active, pragmatic focus. Each year the Institute 
will address a racial or cultural issue that could benefit from a pragmatic 
scholarly focus through its Diversity Challenge conference. 

Irish Institute 

The Irish Institute at Boston College, a division of the Center 
for Irish Programs, was established by the University in 1992 and 
utilizes cross-campus resources to create and provide programs in 
areas such as business, government and education. We believe that 
this mission — and the personal, educational, and corporate 
exchanges it facilitates — serves to promote a more lasting peace on 
the island of Ireland and can provide models for the delivery of good 
government that can be applied to many regions around the world. 

In recent years, the Institute has applied its programming mod- 
els, and expertise with the problems confronting divided societies, to 
embrace participants from the Middle East and North Africa. In 
Ireland, the Institute, together with Irish Studies and the Burns 
Library, shares office space in the Center for Irish Programs' new 
facility at 42 Stephens Green, Dublin. This four-story facility is run 
by, and for, the Center for Irish Programs at Boston College, the 
office which coordinates and oversees all Boston College Irish initia- 
tives in both Boston and Ireland. The Institute hosts an extensive 
series of international lectures and special events. In late 2001, the 
Institute received a fifth federal grant, as a result of a congressional 
appropriation, and is very pleased with this continued recognition of 
its work in Europe and throughout the world. The Irish Institute 
works in partnership with city, state and federal agencies in the 
United Kingdom, Ireland and the United States as well as with the 
Ireland Funds, the International Fund for Ireland, the Irish 
American Partnership, the Irish Management Institute, Ulster 
University and the Boston College community. 

Since 1998, the Irish Institute has been based at Connolly 
House, a state-of-the-art facility recently restored on Hammond 
Street, in Chestnut Hill. For more information on any of the Irish 
Institute's program offerings, call 617-552-4503 or visit its web site 
at http://www.bc.edu/irishinstitute. 

Jesuit Institute 

The Jesuit Institute was established in 1988 to contribute 
towards the response to the question of identity. The Institute, ini- 
tially funded by the Jesuit Community at Boston College, is not an 
additional or separate academic program. It is rather a research insti- 
tute which works in cooperation with existing schools, programs and 
faculties, primarily but not exclusively, at Boston College. Within an 
atmosphere of complete academic freedom essential to a university, 
the Institute engages positively in the intellectual exchange that con- 
stitutes the University. Its overarching purpose is to foster research 
and collaborate interchange upon those issues that emerge at the 
intersection of faith and culture. Through its programs, the Institute 
does this in two ways: by supporting the exploration of those reli- 
gious and ethical questions raised by this intersection and by sup- 
porting the presence of scholars committed to these questions. 

Lonergan Center 

See description in the Theology Department. 



10 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



About Boston College 



Mathematics Institute 

The Boston College Mathematics Institute was established in 
1957 as a unit separate from the Mathematics Department to assist 
in the effort to improve the content and instructional practice of 
mathematics at school level. In the 1960's and 1970's the primary 
focus of the Institute was on providing veteran teachers with renew- 
al programs and professional development opportunities to update 
and deepen their background in mathematics. The National Science 
Foundation was a major source of funding. Concurrently, Institute 
staff developed some supplementary instructional materials to use 
with students in the grades K-12. 

At present, the Mathematics Institute offers professional 
enhancement courses for teachers in the summers at Boston College 
and other sites. Other current projects include research studies and 
content development related to school level mathematics concerns. 

Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life 

The Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life was 
founded to bring together high quality research and scholarship on reli- 
gion to bear on issues of public policy in America. The Center s goal is 
not to advance any ideological agenda, whether liberal or conservative. 
The Center seeks instead to be the sponsor of dialogue and discussion 
which brings together people whose primary concerns are religious 
with people whose primary concerns are political, in the belief that they 
wiU find common ground. The main goals of the Center include the 
promotion of scholarship dealing with religion and public life, faculty 
and student development at Boston College, and outreach activities 
that contribute to a more robust public discussion of critical issues. 

Small Business Development Center 

The Small Business Development Center (SBDC) provides 
managerial, financial and technical assistance and training to small 
business people in the Greater Boston area. Prospective and active 
small business people can receive one-on-one counseling and con- 
sultative assistance in a range of business areas such as finance, mar- 
keting, planning, operations, accounting and controls. The SBDC 
also offers specially designed small business management training 
workshops. Topics include writing a business plan, financial plan- 
ning, marketing, strategic planning, cash flow and general manage- 
ment as well as other varied topics. 

The Massachusetts Small Business Development Center is a 
partnership of the US Small Business Administration, the 
Massachusetts Executive Office of Economic Affairs and Boston 
College through the University of Massachusetts/Amherst under a 
consortium agreement. 

Social Welfare Research Institute 

The Social Welfare Research Institute (SWRI) is a multidisci- 
plinary research center specializing in the study of spirituality, 
wealth, philanthropy, and other aspects of cultural life in an age of 
affluence. Founded in 1970, SWRI is a recognized authority on the 
relationships between economic wherewithal and philanthropy, the 
motivations for charitable involvement, the meaning and practice of 
care, and the forthcoming $41 trillion wealth transfer. 

Among awards and honors received in recent years, Paul G. 
Schervish, Director of SWRI and Professor of Sociology at Boston 
College, and John J. Havens, Senior Research Associate, have been 
named to the Nonprofit Times Power and Influence Top 50. They 
are widely cited for their work in breaking down many of the stereo- 
types surrounding charitable involvement and for providing reliable 
statistics, research, and interpretation to charities, fundraisers, finan- 
cial planners, and the general public. 

Over the past sixteen years SWRI has received generous sup- 
port from the T B. Murphy Foundation Charitable Trust, which 



funded SWRI's ground-breaking Study on Wealth and Philanthropy 
in the 1980s; from the Indiana University Center on Philanthropy; 
the W K. Kellogg Foundation; and the Lilly Endowment, Inc. 

Research papers and further information can be found at 
http://www.bc.edu/swri 

Weston Observatory 

Weston Observatory, formerly Weston College Seismic Station 
(1928-1949), is a part of the Department of Geology and 
Geophysics of Boston College. Located 10 miles from the main 
campus, the Observatory is an interdisciplinary research facility of 
the department, and a center for research in the fields of geophysics, 
geology, and related fields. Weston Observatory was one of the first 
participating facilities in the Worldwide Standardized Seismograph 
Network and operates a twelve-station regional seismic network that 
records data on earthquakes in the northeast, as well as distant earth- 
quakes. The facilities at Weston Observatory offer students a unique 
opportunity to work on exciting projects with modern, sophisticat- 
ed, scientific research equipment in a number of different areas of 
scientific and environmental interest. 

Student Life Resources 

AHANA Student Programs 

(African-American, Hispanic, Asian and Native American) 

The overarching aim of the Office of AHANA Student 
Programs is to promote the academic achievement of AHANA stu- 
dents at Boston College especially those who have been cheated edu- 
cationally. The services available include the following: tutorial assis- 
tance, academic advisement, individual and group counseling, track- 
ing of academic performance, and career counseling. In addition to 
these services, the office assists AHANA student organizations in 
developing and implementing cultural programs. The Office of 
AHANA Student Programs is located in the Thea Bowman AHANA 
Center at 72 College Road, 617-552-3358. 

Options Through Education Program 

Sponsored by the Office of AHANA Student Programs, this 
six-week summer residential program has as its objective the goal of 
equipping 40 pre-freshmen, identified by the Admission Office as 
being at an educational and economic disadvantage, with the skills 
necessary to successfully negotiate Boston College's curriculum. At 
the core of the program's curriculum is a focus on imparting skills in 
two critical areas: English and mathematics. In addition to a focus 
on academics, the program seeks to introduce its students to the 
diverse resources available at Boston College and in the greater 
Boston community. 

Athletic Association 

In keeping with our tradition as a Catholic and Jesuit universi- 
ty, rooted in a belief that seeks God in all things, especially in human 
activity, the Boston College Athletic Association offers a broad-based 
program of intercollegiate athletics, as well as intramural, recreation, 
and club sport opportunities. Through these activities, the Athletic 
Association provides an educational experience that promotes the 
development of the whole person intellectually, physically, socially, 
and spiritually. Through its offerings, the Athletic Association plays 
an integral part in the personal formation and development of stu- 
dents, preparing them for citizenship, service, and leadership. 

The Athletic Association supports and promotes the 
University's goal of a diverse student body, faculty and staff. In this 
spirit, the Athletic Association supports equitable opportunities for 
all students and staff, including minorities and women. 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



11 



About Boston College 



Career Center 

The Career Center at Boston College offers an exciting pro- 
gram of services and resources designed to help students build suc- 
cessful careers. Through the Career Center, students obtain advice 
and guidance, gain work-related experience, make meaningful con- 
nections with alumni and employers, and learn the latest job search 
techniques. It is highly recommended that students participate in the 
Career Center's programs beginning freshman or sophomore year. 

The Career Center's Internship Program provides students of all 
classes with the opportunity to gain practical part-time work experi- 
ence in a professional capacity, during the summer or school year. As 
part of a consortium of 14 universities nationwide, the Boston 
College Internship Program lists on-line internships in a wide range 
of professional settings and geographic areas. Students are encouraged 
to participate in at least 2 or 3 internships before they graduate. 

Students are also encouraged to conduct informational inter- 
views with BC alumni. The Career Network contains 8,000+ alumni 
who have volunteered to share their career experience and to provide 
job search strategy tips. Students can access the Network through 
computers at the Career Center, or via the Career Center's home page. 
The Career Resource Library offers up-to-date career 
resources, including a wide variety of exploration and job search 
resources, graduate and professional school information, and 
employer literature. Computer access to the web for career search 
purposes is available. 

AHANA (African-American, Hispanic, Asian, Native 
American) Career Services provides AHANA students with a month- 
ly newsletter, highlighting career opportunities and events specifical- 
ly targeted toward AHANA students. Additionally, the Career Center 
sponsors an annual AHANA student-employer reception. 

The Recruiting Program provides opportunities for students to 
interview with over 350 employers. Employer Information Sessions 
are open to all students, and a large career fair is held every fall. 

Visit the Career Center at 38 Commonwealth Avenue, 617- 
552-3430, or on the web at http://careercenter.bc.edu. 

Office of Campus Ministry 

The Office of Campus Ministry strives to deepen the faith life 
of Boston College students by offering opportunities to discover, 
grow in, express and celebrate the religious dimensions of their lives. 
Liturgies, retreats, small faith communities and service projects are 
popular programs offered throughout the year. Campus Ministry 
strives to show the close relationship of the Gospel and the call to the 
works of justice. The Office of Campus Ministry is located in 
McElroy 215 and can be reached by calling 617-552-3475 or on the 
web at http://www.bc.edu/campus-ministry. 

Office of tfie Dean for Student Development 

The Office of the Dean for Student Development coordinates 
the planning, implementation and evaluation of programs and ser- 
vices promoting student development. This includes overseeing stu- 
dent clubs and organizations, programming, the Undergraduate 
Government of Boston College, the Emerging Leaders Program, the 
Graduate Student Association and the Graduate Student Center at 
Murray House, Alcohol and Drug Education, off-campus and com- 
muting student affairs, international student services, and the Global 
Proficiency Program. The Dean and assistants are also responsible 
for coordinating policies and procedures concerning student con- 
duct and discipline, and the judicial process. The Office of the Dean 
for Student Development is located in McElroy 233, 617-552-3470. 



Dining Services 

The University offers a varied and nutritionally balanced menu 
in seven dining areas: Carney's, the Cafe, and the Eagle's Nest at 
McElroy Commons, Lyons Hall on Middle Campus, Stuart Hall on 
Newton Campus, the Lower Campus Dining Facility, and the Walsh 
Hall Dining Room. In addition students can use their Meal Plan in 
the concessions at Conte Forum. 

The Meal Plan is mandatory for resident students living in 
Upper Campus, Newton Campus, Walsh Hall, GG Comm. Ave., 
Greycliff Vanderslice Hall, and 90 St. Thomas More Drive. The cost 
of the full Meal Plan for 2002-03 is $1,825.00 per semester or 
$3,650.00 per year. 

Optional meal plans are available to all other students living in 
on- or off-campus apartments, and to commuters. Further informa- 
tion can be obtained by contacting the Office of Student Services, 
617-552-3300, Lyons Hall. A dietitian is available to those students 
with special dietary needs or restrictions, by calling 617-552-8040. 

Office of Services for Students witfi Disabilities 

Boston College complies with federal regulations prohibiting dis- 
crimination on the basis of disability. Students with disabilities apply- 
ing to Boston College are strongly encouraged to make their disabili- 
ty known voluntarily to the Admission Office of the School to which 
they are applying. This information will not affect the decision on 
admission; rather, it will give the University the opportunity to offer 
specific assistance and support through programs and services provid- 
ed by the Office of Services for Students with Disabilities. 

For more information regarding services for students with 
physical disabilities, contact John Hennessy, Coordinator of Services 
for Students with Disabilities and 504/ADA Compliance Officer for 
Students, Gasson Hall 108, 617-552-3310. For more information 
regarding services for students with learning disabilities contact Dr. 
Kathleen Duggan, Coordinator of Academic Support Services for 
Learning Disabled Students, Academic Development Center, 
O'Neill 200, 617-552-8055. 

Graduate Student Association 

The Graduate Student Association (GSA) of Boston College is 
an autonomous organization that serves the Graduate Schools of 
Arts and Sciences, Education, Nursing, Social Work, and the Carroll 
Graduate School of Management. 

The GSA exists to provide academic support in the form of 
conference grants and special group funding to host social, cultural 
and academic programs for graduates, and to inform the graduate 
community of matters of interest to them. The GSA also advocates 
for graduate student interests within the University. 

The GSA Officers, elected each April for a year of service, 
include a Director and a Finance Director. The GSA Council, which 
meets monthly, is made up of representatives from all the graduate 
schools. The GSA Council and staff work together to strengthen the 
collective voice of graduate students. The GSA is funded by an activ- 
ity fee charged to every graduate student. 

The GSA has an office in the John Courtney Murray, S.J. 
Graduate Student Center located at 292 Hammond Street, a short 
walk from middle campus. This Graduate Center which opened its 
doors in December 1997 offers services to graduate students such as 
a computer center, kitchen/dining area, cable TV, study rooms and 
conference rooms. 

Jofin Courtney Murray, S.J. Graduate Student Center 

The Murray Graduate Center has been established to serve the 
needs of Boston College's graduate students. It is staffed by the 
Associate Dean for Graduate Student Life, an Administrative/ 



12 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



About Boston College 



Technology Support Assistant, Graduate Student Resident 
Managers, and work-study staff. During the academic year the 
Graduate Center is open from 8:00 A.M. to 11:00 P.M., Monday 
through Friday 12:00 P.M. to 5:00 PM., on Saturday and 5:00 RM. 
to 11:00 RM. on Sunday. 

The Mission of the Murray Graduate Center is as follows: 

• To build community among graduate students, faculty, and 
administration by providing a center that offers opportunities 
to gather for discussion, reflection, presentations, meals, and 
social functions. 

• To function as a center of information by responding to indi- 
vidual and group questions regarding resources such as health 
services, career services, retreats and programs in spirituality, 
etc., available at the University. 

• To serve as a coordinating center for graduate student groups 
such as the Graduate Student Association, the Graduate 
International Student Association, and the Graduate AHANA 
Student Association. 

• To be the home of the Graduate Center website located at 
http://www.bc.edu/gsc. Website capabilities include reserving 
space for graduate events, which is updated monthly, graduate 
links, off-campus and on-campus graduate resources and 
information. 

University Health Services 

The primary goal of University Health Services is to provide 
confidential medical/nursing care and educational programs to safe- 
guard the physical well-being and mental health of the student body. 
The Department is located in Gushing Hall on the Main Campus 
and can be contacted by calling 617-552-3225. 

The Outpatient Unit staff includes full-time primary care 
physicians, nurse practitioners and on-site specialty consultants. The 
24 hour Inpatient Unit provides care for students requiring observa- 
tion and frequent physician/nurse assessments. The staff also pro- 
vides urgent outpatient nursing assessments when the Outpatient 
Center is closed and can be reached at 617-552-3227. 

Boston College requires all undergraduate resident students be 
enrolled with the University Health Services. A mandatory 
Health/Infirmary fee is included on the tuition bill. Undergraduate 
students living off-campus who have been charged this fee and do 
not wish to utilize the service may request a waiver from the 
University Health Services office in Gushing Hall or downloaded it 
from the Health Services website. It must be submitted to the 
Health Services Department during the month of September. 

Membership in the University Health Services is optional for 
graduate students and is available through payment of the 
Health/Infirmary fee or on a Fee-for-Service basis. 

All students may have access to the facilities for first aid or in 
case of an emergency. 

The Health/Infirmary Fee covers medical care provided on cam- 
pus by University Health Services and is not to be confused with 
medical insurance. Massachusetts law requires that all full-time stu- 
dents be covered by an Accident and Sickness Insurance Policy so that 
protection may be assured in case of hospitalization or other costly 
outside medical services. (See Massachusetts Medical Insurance.) 

An informational brochure entitled "University Health Services 
Staying Well" is available at the University Health Services office. 
Gushing Hall, first floor, 617-552-3225. Insurance information can 
also be obtained there. Health Services has a detailed website at 
http://www.bc.edu/health_services. 



Immunization 

Both graduate and undergraduate students registering at the 
credit levels listed below are required to comply with Massachusetts 
General Laws (the College Immunization Law): 

School Credit Level 

Arts and Sciences 9 

Management 12 

College of Advancing Studies 12 

Nursing 9 

Education 9 

Social Work 12 

Law 12 

The College Immunization Law requires proof of the following 
immunizations: 

• 1 Tetanus-Diphtheria Booster: Within the past 10 years. 

• 2 Measles Immunizations: Dose 1 must be after the first birth- 
day. Dose 2 must be at least one month after the first dose. 

• 1 Mumps Immunization: Immunized with vaccine after the 
first birthday. 

• 1 Rubella Immunization: Immunized with vaccine after the 
first birthday. 

Effective September 2001 all full-time freshmen must show 
proof of receiving 3 doses of the hepatitis B vaccine. 

If proof of immunization for measles, mumps, and/or rubella is 
not available, a blood Titer showing immunity will be accepted. 

Failure to show proof of immunizations within 30 days from the 
start of classes will result in a block on your registration and an 
administrative fee of $50.00 will be charged to your student account. 

The only exceptions permitted are conflicts with personal reli- 
gious belief or documentation by a physician that immunizations 
should not be given due to pre-existing medical problems. 

University Counseling Services (UCS) 

University Counseling Services (UCS) provides counseling and 
other psychological services to the students of Boston College. The 
goal of UCS is to enable students to develop fully and to make the 
most of their educational experience. Services available include indi- 
vidual counseling and psychotherapy, group counseling, consulta- 
tion, evaluation and referral. Students wishing to make an appoint- 
ment may contact a counselor in any one of the Counseling offices 
on campus. The University Counseling Offices can found in the fol- 
lowing locations: Gasson 108, 617-552-3310; Campion 301, 617- 
552-4210; Fulton 254, 617-552-3927. 

Inspection of Education Records 

As a matter of necessity, Boston College continuously records a 
large number of specific items relating to its students. This informa- 
tion is necessary to support its educational programs as well as to 
administer housing, athletics, and extracurricular programs. The 
University also maintains certain records such as employment, finan- 
cial and accounting information for its own use and to comply with 
state and federal regulations. Boston College has committed itself to 
protect the privacy rights of its students and to maintain the confi- 
dentiality of its records. In addition, the College endorses and com- 
plies with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1 974 (the 
Buckley Amendment), a federal statute that affords students certain 
rights with respect to their education records. They are as follows: 

• The right to inspect and review the student's education 
records within 45 days of the day the University receives a 
request for access. 

Students should submit to the Office of Student Services, 
dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate 
official, written requests that identify the record(s) they wish 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



13 



About Boston College 



to inspect. The University official will make arrangements for 
access and notify the student of the time and place where the 
records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained 
by the University official to whom the request was submitted, 
that official shall advise the student of the correct official to 
whom the request should be addressed. 

• The right to request the amendment of the student's educa- 
tion records that the student believes are inaccurate or mis- 
leading. Students may ask the University to amend a record 
that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should 
write to the University official responsible for the record, 
clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and 
specify why it is inaccurate or misleading. 

If the University decides not to amend the record as requested 
by the student, the University will notify the student of the 
decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing 
regarding the request for amendment. Additional information 
regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the stu- 
dent when notified of the right to a hearing. 

• The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable 
information contained in the student's education records, 
except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without 
consent. 

One exception which permits disclosure without consent is 
disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational inter- 
ests. A school official is a person employed by the University 
in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or 
support staff position (including law enforcement unit per- 
sonnel and health staff) ; a person or company with whom the 
University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or col- 
lection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a 
student serving on an official committee, such as a discipli- 
nary or grievance committee, or assisting another school offi- 
cial in performing his or her tasks. 

A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the offi- 
cial needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or 
her professional responsibility. Upon request, the University 
may disclose education records without consent to officials of 
another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. 
The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of 
Education concerning alleged failures by the University to 
comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and 
address of the office that administers FERPA is as follows: 
Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of 
Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC, 
20202-4605. 

Confidentiality of Student Records 

Certain personally identifiable information from a student's 
education record, designated by Boston College as directory infor- 
mation, may be released without the student's prior consent. This 
information includes name, term, home, local, and electronic mail 
addresses, telephone number, date and place of birth, photograph, 
major field of study, enrollment status, grade level, participation in 
officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of mem- 
bers of athletic teams, dates of attendance, school/college of enroll- 
ment, anticipated date of graduation, degrees and awards received, 
the most recent previous educational agency or institution attended, 
and other similar information. 

Electronic and print [The Source) access to selected directory 
information is available to members both within (via authenticated 
access) and outside the Boston College community. A student who so 
wishes has the absolute right to prevent release of all directory infor- 



mation including verification of enrollment, or of suppressing select- 
ed directory information either to the Boston College community or 
to the general public. In order to do this, students must enter Agora 
(http://agora.bc.edu/start) by the end of their first week of enroll- 
ment to suppress the release of all or selected directory information. 
Suppression is available by selecting U-View and Privacy Preferences. 
All non-directory information is considered confidential and 
will not be released to outside inquiries without the express written 
consent of the student. 

FERPA Rights 

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 
(FERPA) provides for rights of privacy in, as well as right to inspect, 
Educational Records. A full statement of these rights is set out in the 
Boston College Bulletin. Please note: when a student reaches the age of 
1 8 or begins attending a post-secondary institution regardless of age, 
FERPA rights transfer to the student. Parents rights are listed below. 

• Parents may obtain directory information at the discretion of 
the institution. 

• Parents may obtain non-directory information (grades, GPA, 
etc.) only at the discretion of the institution AND after it has 
been determined that their child is legally their dependent. 

• Parents may also obtain non-directory information by obtain- 
ing a signed consent from their child. 

Enrollment Statistics and Graduation Rate 

During the fall of 2001, Boston College enrolled 9,000 under- 
graduates, 797 College of Advancing Studies students, and 4,510 
graduates students. 

Of the freshmen who first enrolled at Boston College in the fall 
of 1994, eighty-six percent had completed their degree by 2000 and 
four percent had chosen to continue their studies elsewhere. The 
combined retention rate for this entering class is 90 percent. Of the 
graduates, 95 percent earned their degrees within four years. 

Notice of Information Disclosures 

In compliance with the Higher Education Amendments of 
1998, Boston College makes available the following information 
that is required to be disclosed under Subpart D of Part 668 of Title 
34 of the Code of Federal Regulations (Institutional and Financial 
Assistance Information for Students) and under Section 99.7 of the 
Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. Included below are 
instructions on how to obtain the information. 

The following information is available to any enrolled student or 
prospective student, upon request: 

• Financial assistance information, including a description of 
the following: the federal, state, local, private, and institution- 
al student financial assistance programs available to students 
who enroll at the University; application forms and proce- 
dures; eligibility requirements; criteria for selection; criteria 
for determining the amount of the award; satisfactory acade- 
mic progress standards; methods of disbursement; loan terms; 
conditions and terms for employment provided as part of a 
student's financial assistance package; and conditions for 
deferral of federal loan repayments for volunteer service. 

• Institutional information, including the cost of attendance; 
refund policies; requirements and procedures for officially 
withdrawing from the University; requirements for the return 
of Title IV assistance; academic program, faculty, and facili- 
ties; accreditation and licensure; special facilities and services 
for students with disabilities; and a statement that a student's 
enrollment in a study abroad program approved for credit by 
the University may be considered enrollment at the University 
for the purpose of applying for Title IV assistance. 



14 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



About Boston College 



• Boston College's graduation rates 

Financial assistance, institutional, and graduation rate informa- 
tion is published in this document, the Boston College Bulletin. To 
request a copy of the Bulletin, please call the Boston College Office 
of Student Services at 800-294-0294 or 617-552-3300; send a fax to 
this office at 617-552-4889; or send your request in writing to 
Boston College, Office of Student Services, Lyons Hall, 140 
Common-wealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467. 

This information may also be obtained by accessing the Boston 
College Office of Student Services website at http://www.bc.edu/ 
studentservices. 

The following information is disseminated by October 1 of each 
year to enrolled students and current employees, and is available to 
prospective students and prospective employees upon request: 

Boston College's annual security report, the Campus Safety 
and Security Program, contains statistics for the previous three 
years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus and on 
public property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the 
campus. The report also incorporates institutional policies concern- 
ing campus security, including Reporting of Crimes and Other 
Emergencies, Safety Notification Procedure, Campus Law 
Enforcement, and Campus Sexual Assault Program; information 
regarding the available educational programs that address campus 
security procedures and practices, and crime prevention; informa- 
tion regarding drug and alcohol policies, and other matters. 

The following information is available to enrolled students, 
prospective students, and the public upon request: 

A report of athletic program participation rates and financial 
support data. This report details participation rates, financial sup- 
port, and other information on men's and women's intercollegiate 
athletic programs. To request a copy of either of the above reports, 
please call the Office of the Financial Vice President and Treasurer at 
617-552-4856, or send your request in writing to Boston College, 
Office of the Financial Vice President and Treasurer, More Hall 200, 
140 Commonwealth Avenue, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467. 

Enrolled students are notified each year of their rights, and the pro- 
cedures for the inspection, correction, and disclosure of information in 
student records, under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act. 
This information is published in this document, the Boston College 
Bulletin, and may also be obtained by accessing the Boston College 
Office of Student Services website at http://vvTvw.bc.edu/studentservices. 

Notice of Non-Discrimination 

Founded by the Society of Jesus in 1863, Boston College is 
dedicated to intellectual excellence and to its Jesuit, Catholic mission 
and heritage. Committed to having a welcoming environment for all 
people, it recognizes the important contribution a diverse commu- 
nity of students, faculty and administrators makes in the advance- 
ment of its goals and ideals. 

Boston College rejects and condemns all forms of harassment, 
and has developed specific procedures to redress incidents of harass- 
ment against any members of its community, whatever the basis or 
circumstance. Moreover, in accordance with all applicable state and 
federal laws, Boston College does not discriminate in employment, 
housing or education on the basis of a person's race, sex, age, nation- 
al and ethnic origin, religion, disabilities, marital or parental status, 
veteran status or personal history. In addition, in a manner faithful to 
the Jesuit Catholic principles and values that sustain its mission and 
heritage, Boston College is in compliance with applicable state laws 
providing equal opportunity without regard to sexual orientation. 

Boston College has designated the Director of Affirmative 
Action to coordinate its efforts to comply with and carry out its 



responsibilities to prevent discrimination in accordance with state 
and federal laws. Any applicant for admission or employment, as 
well as all students, faculty members, and employees are welcome to 
raise any questions regarding violation of this policy with the 
Director of Affirmative Action, More Hall 314, 617-552-2947. In 
addition, any person who believes that an act of discrimination 
based on Title IX discrimination has occurred at Boston College, 
may raise this issue with the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights of 
the United States Department of Education. 

Residence Accommodations 

Boston College offers several different types of undergraduate 
student housing in three different residence areas. Each area houses 
both male and female students. The building style and individual 
accommodations vary with the location and are described below: 

Lower Campus 

Edmond's Hall Apartment Complex: The nine-story Edmond's 
Hall Apartment Complex, completed in the fall of 1975, houses 
approximately 800 male and female students in 200 two-bedroom 
apartments. Each apartment unit consists of two bedrooms, bath, 
dining area, kitchen and living room. These modern, completely fur- 
nished, apartment units house primarily upperclassmen. 
Subscription to the University Meal Plan is optional. 

Ignacio and Rubenstein Apartment Complex: This air-condi- 
tioned apartment complex, completed in the spring of 1973, hous- 
es approximately 725 students. Each completely furnished apart- 
ment unit includes two or three bedrooms, two baths, living room, 
dining area and kitchen. This area houses males and females, but is 
generally restricted to juniors and seniors. Subscription to the 
University Meal Plan is optional. 

Voute Hall and Gabelli Hall: These apartment-style residence 
halls were completed in the fall of 1988. Each two-bedroom apart- 
ment has a full kitchen, dining, and living room plus a full bath. 
Approximately 384 upperclassmen reside in these fully furnished 
units. Seventeen townhouses are unique features of these halls. The 
buildings provide students with access to a variety of lounges 
equipped for study and social uses, libraries and a weight room. 
Subscription to the University Meal Plan is optional. 

Modular Apartment Complex: The Modular Complex consists 
of 80 duplex townhouse apartments and houses approximately 470 
students. Completed in the spring of 1971, each air-conditioned 
and fully furnished apartment unit has three bedrooms, two and 
one-half baths, living room, and kitchen. This area houses both male 
and female students, six per apartment, but is generally restricted to 
seniors. Subscription to the University Meal Plan is optional. 

Michael P. Wabh, S.J. Residence Hall: This suite-style residence 
hall, completed in the fall of 1980, consists of four- and eight-person 
suites housing approximately 800 male and female students. Each 
eight-person suite has a furnished lounge area and includes a sink and 
counter space. Each floor of the residence hall has a separate lounge 
and study area. The facility also includes a television lounge, a laun- 
dry room, and a fitness center. These units house primarily sopho- 
mores. Subscription to the University Meal Plan is mandatory. 

Sixty-Six Commonwealth Avenue: Located on the Lower 
Campus, this upperclassman facility houses approximately 1 50 stu- 
dents in predominantly single accommodations. Each room is fully 
furnished and additional lounge areas are provided. The building 
also houses the Multi Faith Worship space open for private prayer or 
religious services for all individuals or denominations. Subscription 
to the University Meal Plan is mandatory. 

Vanderslice and 90 St. Thomas More Drive: These suite-style res- 
idence halls, completed in the fall of 1993, consists of six, seven. 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



15 



About Boston College 



eight and nine person suites housing approximately 750 male and 
female students. Each suite has a furnished lounge and kitchen area 
featuring a sink with counter space, a refrigerator and a kitchen table 
and chairs. These facilities also include a Cabaret, game room, car- 
diovascular and music rooms, libraries and casual study rooms. 
These units house sophomores and juniors. Subscription to the 
University Meal Plan is mandatory. 

Upper Campus 

These are standard residence halls with two, three and four per- 
son student rooms along a corridor. Each room is furnished with a 
bed, desk, dresser, chair, and shades. These twelve buildings house 
approximately 1,700 total freshmen and sophomore students. All 
Upper Campus residents are required to subscribe to the University 
Meal Plan. 

Newton Campus 

The six residence halls on the Newton Campus are similar to 
the Upper Campus halls and are furnished in the same manner. 
They house approximately 850 students. Daily free bus service is 
provided to the Chestnut Hill campus, which is located one mile 
from the Newton Campus. The Newton Campus offers a unique 
environment and special academic and social programs that make it 
attractive to many freshman students. The University Meal Plan is 
mandatory for Newton Campus residents and a dining room and 
cafeteria are located on the campus, as well as a library and a chapel. 

Special Imerest 

The University offers a variety of Special Interest Housing 
options to undergraduate students. 

The Romance Language floor, located in Gabelli Hall, primarily 
houses students who want to improve their speaking knowledge of 
French and Spanish. 

Greycliff Honors House, located one-half mile from the main 
campus, houses 45 undergraduate students who are participating in 
the Honors Program. Faculty lectures, cultural and academic pro- 
grams are held in this residence hall throughout the year. 

The Mosaic Multi-Cultural floor, open to students of all ethnic 
and racial backgrounds, will give residents the opportunity to be 
introduced to and learn about various cultures. Students work to 
define and promote diversity within the hall and throughout the 
University through programmatic methods. 

Shaw Leadership Program provides students with the opportu- 
nity to plan, develop and implement social, educational, cultural 
and service-oriented programs for the Boston College community 
and its neighbors. Shaw students are given the opportunity to devel- 
op their leadership, presentation and organizational skills through a 
variety of workshops, weekly meetings, retreats and through spon- 
soring one major program during the year. 

The Substance Free floor allows students to reside on an alcohol, 
drug, and tobacco free floor. Residents are required to plan and par- 
ticipate in a biweekly program/discussion and to sign a Substance 
Free Living Agreement prior to moving in. 

Edmond's Hall ninth floor has been designated as a 24-hour 
quiet living floor. Upperclassmen are able to reside in apartment- 
style accommodations with a quiet atmosphere. Students are 
required to sign a Quiet Living Agreement prior to moving in. 

Smoke-Free Environment 

Students residing in these residence floors/halls and their guests 
agree to maintain a smoke-free environment not only in their indi- 
vidual rooms but throughout the entire building, including all 
public areas. 



Oscar Romero Social Activism Program 

Boston College's Oscar Romero Social Activism Program is a 
residential program intended to provide students with an opportu- 
nity to make a difference outside the classroom. The program was 
designed to provide a resource and positive environment for highly 
motivated students who will have an opportunity to learn from 
upperclassmen, professionals, community leaders, and most impor- 
tantly, each other. 

Oflf-Campus Housing 

The University operates an Oflf-Campus Housing OflFice in 
Rubenstein Hall for the convenience of those seeking referrals for off- 
campus housing. The office maintains updated listings of apartments 
and rooms available for rental in areas surrounding the campus. 
Interested students should visit the office Monday through Friday, 9:00 
A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Listings are available on the Residential Life website. 

Tuition and Fees 

Tuition and fees for undergraduates are due by August 1 for 
first semester and by December 13 for second semester. Restrictions 
will be placed on any account not resolved by the due dates. These 
restrictions include denied access to Housing and the Athletic 
Complex, use of the I.D. Card and Meal Plan, and the ability to 
drop and add courses and to cash checks at the Cashier's Office. In 
severe cases, students will be withdrawn from the University. In 
addition, a $100.00 late payment fee will be assessed on any account 
that is not resolved by the due dates listed above. There will be 
absolutely no registration or confirmation of registration allowed 
after October 25, 2002, for first semester and April 1, 2003, for sec- 
ond semester. Scholarship holders are not exempt from payment of 
registration, acceptance fees, insurance and miscellaneous fees at the 
time prescribed. 

Tuition and fees for the Graduate Schools of Management, Arts 
and Sciences, Education, Nursing, and Social Work are billed on 
August 15 for the fall and December 13 for the spring. Payment is 
due on September 13 and January 15 respectively. All students 
should be registered by August 1 5 for the fall and December 1 3 for 
the spring. 

The tuition in the Law School is due semi-annually by August 
10 and by December 13. 

There is a $100.00 late payment fee for payments received after 
the due dates listed above. In severe cases, students whose accounts 
are not resolved by the due dates may be withdrawn from the 
University. 

Undergraduate Tuition 

• First semester tuition and fees are due by August 10, 2002. 

• Tuition first semester — $12,715.00 

• Second semester tuition and fees are due by December 13, 
2002. 

• Tuition second semester — $12,715.00 

Undergraduate General Fees* 

Application Fee (not refundable): 55.00 

Acceptance Fee: 200.00 

This fee will be applied towards students' tuition in the second 
semester of their senior year. Students forfeit this fee if they with- 
draw prior to completing their first semester. Students who with- 
draw after completing their first semester are entitled to a refund of 
this fee (provided they do not have an outstanding student account) 
if they formally withdraw prior to July 1 for fall semester, or 
December 1 for spring semester. 

Health Fee: 332.00 

Identification Card (required for all new students): 20.00 



16 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



About Boston College 

Law School***: 200.00 

Social Work: 200.00 

***Initial deposit due by April 20 with an additional 400.00 

due by June 1 . 

Activity fee— per semester*** (Grad A&S, LSOE, CGSON, 

GSSW) 

7 credits or more per semester: 25.00 

fewer than 7 credits per semester: 15.00 

Activity fee — per semester*** (Grad SOM) 

7 credits or more per semester: 50.00 

fewer than 7 credits per semester: 25.00 

Application fee (non-refiindable) 

Grad Arts & Sciences: 50.00 

LSOE, GSSW, CGSON: 40.00 

CGSOM: 45.00 

LawSchooh 65.00 

Doctoral Comprehensive fee (per semester) 

Grad Arts & Sciences: 774.00 

CGSON and LSOE: 760.00 

CGSOM: 874.00 

GSSW: 700.00 

Continuation fee (per semester — Ph.D.) Cand. 

Grad Arts & Sciences: 774.00 

CGSON and LSOE: 760.00 

CGSOM: 874.00 

GSSW: 700.00 

Master's Thesis Direction (per semester) 

Grad Arts & Sciences: 774.00 

CGSON and LGSOE: 760.00 

Interim Study: 30.00 

Laboratory fee (per semester): 190.00-485.00 

Late Payment fee: 100.00 

Mass. Medical Insurance (per year): 580.00 

(240.00 first semester; 340.00 second semester) 

Microfilm and Binding 

Doctoral Dissertation: 100.00 

Master's thesis: 80.00 

Copyright fee (optional): 35.00 

Nursing Laboratory fee: 190.00 

Registration fee (per semester, non-refundable): 15.00 

Student Identification Card (mandatory for all new students):20.00 
*Fees are proposed and subject to change. 
***Students who are in off-campus satellite programs in the 

School of Social Work are exempt from the activity fee. 

The Trustees of Boston College reserve the right to change the 

tuition rates and to make additional charges within the University 

whenever such action is deemed necessary. 

Massachusetts Medical Insurance 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts Law has mandated that all 
students, graduate and undergraduate, taking at least 75 percent of 
full-time credit hours must be covered by medical insurance provid- 
ing a specified minimum coverage. Determination of whether or not 
a graduate student is required to enroll in the insurance program is 
based strictly on the actual number of credits for which the student 
is registered each semester. Graduate students in the Schools of 
Social Work, Management, and Advancing Studies who register for 
9 or more credits are considered 75 percent of full-time. Students in 
Graduate Arts and Sciences, Nursing and Education who register for 
7 or more credits are considered 75 percent of full-time. 



Late Payment Fee: 100.00 

Freshman Orientation Fee (mandatory for all freshman): ...295.00 

Undergraduate Special Fees* 

Extra Course — per semester hour credit: 848.00 

Laboratory Fee — per semester: 135.00-485.00 

Mass. Medical Insurance: 580.00 per year 

(240.00 first semester, 340.00 second semester) 

Nursing Laboratory Fee: 180.00-190.00 

NCLEX Assessment Test: 35.00 

Exemption Examination: 30.00-60.00 

Special Students — per semester hour credit: 848.00 

Student Activity Fee: 100.00 per year 

($50.00 per semester) 

Resident Student Expenses 

Board — per semester: 1,825.00 

Room Fee (includes Mail Service) per semester 

(varies depending on room): 2,670.00-3,585.00 

Room Guarantee Fee**: 200.00 

Students accepted as residents are required to pay a $200.00 
room guarantee fee. This fee is applied towards the student's first 
semester housing charges. 

*A11 fees are proposed and subject to change. 
**Incoming students who withdraw from housing by June 1 
will have 100% of their deposit refunded. Incoming students who 
withdraw from housing between June 1 and July 15 will have 50% 
of their deposit refunded. No refunds will be made to incoming stu- 
dents who withdraw after July 15. Refunds will be determined by 
the date the written notification of withdrawal is received by the 
Office of Residential Life. 

The Trustees of Boston College reserve the right to change the 
tuition rates and to make additional charges within the University 
whenever such action is deemed necessary. 

Graduate Tuition 

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences** 

Tuition per semester hour: 774.00 

Auditor's fee*** — per semester hour: 387.00 

Lynch School of Education, Connell Graduate School of Nursing 
and the Institute of Religious Education and Pastoral Ministry** 

Tuition per semester hour: 760.00 

Auditor's fee*** — per semester hour: 380.00 

Carroll School of Management, Graduate Division** 

Tuition per semester hour: 874.00 

Auditor's fee*** — per semester hour: 437.00 

Graduate School of Social Work** 

Tuition (full-time): 22,240.00 

Tuition per semester hour, M.S.W: 608.00 

Tuition per semester hour, D.S.W: 700.00 

Law School** 

Tuition: 28,440.00 

**Students cross-registering in graduate programs pay tuition 

rates of the school in which they are enrolled. 

***Audits are considered fees and are not refundable. Students 

changing from credit to audit receive no refund. 

Graduate General Fees* 
Acceptance Deposit 

Graduate Education: 200.00 

Graduate Nursing: 200.00 

CGSOM— part-time: 200.00 

CGSOM— full-time: 400.00 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



17 



About Boston College 



Boston College will offer all students — graduate and under- 
graduate — the option of participating in the plan offered at the 
University or submitting a waiver. The details of the University's 
Insurance plan are available on the U-View system or on the World 
Wide Web at http://agora.bc.edu. Students may waive the BC insur- 
ance plan by completing the electronic waiver form on U-View or on 
the World Wide Web. Students under the age of 18 are required to 
submit a written waiver form with the signature of their parent/ 
guardian. This form is available for download on the web at 
http://www.bc.edu/studentservices. The waiver must be completed 
and submitted by October 4, 2002, for the fall semester and by 
February 7, 2003, for spring semester. Students who do not complete 
a waiver by the due dates will be enrolled and billed for the BC plan. 

Students registering for less than 75 percent of a full-time 
course load who wish to enroll in the insurance plan must be in a 
degree-granting program. Such students enroll directly with the 
insurance company using the part-time enrollment form available at 
the Boston College Health Services Department in Cushing Hall, at 
Walter W Sussenguth and Associates, or on the web at 
http://www.bc.edu/studentservices. The coverage becomes effective 
upon receipt of the application and payment by the insurer if 
received after the due dates above. 

Please note: All doctoral students as well as international stu- 
dents at Boston College will automatically be charged for the Boston 
College Medical Insurance unless a waiver is submitted showing 
comparable insurance. 

International students must contact the Intercultural Office to 
obtain a waiver. 

Check Cashing 

Students presenting a valid Boston College ID may cash 
checks ($50 limit) at the Cashier's Office, More Hall, Monday- 
Friday, 9:00 A.M. -4:00 P.M. There is a 50 cent service charge. 
Returned checks will be fined in the following manner: 

• First three checks returned: $15.00 per check 

• All additional checks: $25.00 per check 

• Any check in excess of $2,000.00: $50.00 per check 

• Check cashing privileges are revoked afi:er the third returned check. 

Acceleration 

Full-time undergraduate students authorized by the Dean's 
Office to take accelerated programs leading to an early graduation 
will be billed by Student Services for extra courses taken during a 
regular semester at the rate of $848.00 per credit taken. This will be 
in addition to the flat rate tuition charge covering a normal load 
(four courses per semester as a senior; five courses per semester prior 
to senior year). No additional fee will be assessed for extra courses 
taken for enrichment purposes only. However, when a student who 
has taken extra courses for enrichment later wishes to use those 
courses for acceleration, a fee will be assessed based on the tuition 
rate that was in effect when the courses were taken. Whenever a stu- 
dent has been given approval to take Boston College summer cours- 
es for acceleration, he or she will pay the regular Summer Session 
tuition for those courses. 

Withdrawals and Refunds 

Fees are not refundable. 

Tuition is cancelled subject to the following conditions: 

• Notice of withdrawal must be made in writing to the dean of 
the student's school. 

• The date of receipt of written notice of withdrawal by the 
Dean's Office determines the amount of tuition cancelled. 



The cancellation schedule that follows will apply to students 
withdrawing voluntarily, as well as to students who are dismissed 
from the University for academic or disciplinary reasons. 

Undergraduate Refund Schedule 

Undergraduate students withdrawing by the following dates 

will receive the tuition refund indicated below. 

First Semester 

by Aug. 30, 2002: 100% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Sept. 13, 2002: 80% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Sept. 20, 2002: 60% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Sept. 27, 2002: 40% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Oct. 4, 2002: 20% of tuition charged is cancelled 

Second Semester 

by Jan. 10, 2003: 100% of tuition charged is cancelled 

by Jan. 24, 2003: 80% of tuition charged is cancelled 

by Jan. 31, 2003: 60% of tuition charged is cancelled 

by Feb. 7, 2003: 40% of tuition charged is cancelled 

by Feb. 14, 2003: 20% of tuition charged is cancelled 

No cancellations are made after the 5th week of classes. 

Graduate Refund Schedule (Excluding Law) 

Graduate students (except Law students) withdrawing by the 
following dates will receive the tuition refund indicated below. 
First Semester 

• by Sept. 9, 2002: 100% of tuition charged is cancelled 

• by Sept. 13, 2002: 80% of tuition charged is cancelled 

• by Sept. 20, 2002: 60% of tuition charged is cancelled 

• by Sept. 27, 2002: 40% of tuition charged is cancelled 

• by Oct. 4, 2002: 20% of tuition charged is cancelled 
Second Semester 

• by Jan. 17, 2003: 100% of tuition charged is cancelled 

• by Jan. 24, 2003: 80% of tuition charged is cancelled 

• by Jan. 31, 2003: 60% of tuition charged is cancelled 

• by Feb. 7, 2003: 40% of tuition charged is cancelled 

• by Feb. 14, 2003: 20% of tuition charged is cancelled 
No cancellations are made after the 5th week of classes. 

Lau) Refund Schedule 

Law students are subject to the refund schedule outlined below. 
First Semester 

by August 23, 2002: 100% of tuition charged is cancelled 

by Sept. 6, 2002: 80% of tuition charged is cancelled 

by Sept. 13, 2002: 60% of tuition charged is cancelled 

by Sept. 20, 2002: 40% of tuition charged is cancelled 

by Sept. 27, 2002: 20% of tuition charged is cancelled 

Second Semester 

by Jan. 3, 2003: 100% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Jan. 17, 2003: 80% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Jan. 24, 2003: 60% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Jan. 31, 2003: 40% of tuition charged is cancelled 
by Feb. 7, 2003: 20% of tuition charged is cancelled 
If a student does not wish to leave any resulting credit balance 
on his or her account for subsequent use, he or she should request, 
in writing or in person, that the Office of Student Services issue a 
refund. If a student has a credit balance as a result of Federal Aid and 
he/she does not request a refund, the University will, within two 
weeks, send the credit balance to his/her local address. 

Federal regulations establish procedural guidelines applicable to 
the treatment of refunds whenever the student has been the recipi- 
ent of financial assistance through any program authorized under 
Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965. These guidelines per- 
tain to the Federal Perkins Loan, the Federal Pell Grant, the Federal 



18 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



About Boston College 



Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, the Federal College 
Work- Study, and the Federal Stafford and Plus-Loan. In such cases, 
the regulations require that a portion of any refund be returned 
according to federal guidelines. Further, if a student withdraws, the 
institution must determine if any cash disbursement of Title IV 
funds, made directly to the student by the institution for non- 
instructional purposes, is an overpayment that must be repaid to the 
Title IV program. University policy developed to comply with the 
regulations at Boston College will be available upon request from the 
Office of Student Services. 

National Student Clearinghouse 

Boston College is a member of the National Student 
Clearinghouse. The National Student Clearinghouse is responsible 
for the processing of Student Loan Deferment forms for Subsidized 
and Unsubsidized Stafford, SLS, PLUS, and Perkins loans. 

Student deferment forms will be sent to the Clearinghouse by 
the Office of Student Services. Students wishing to defer their loans 
should request a deferment form from their lender, fill out the stu- 
dent portion, list the semester for which they are deferring, and then 
turn it into the Office of Student Services in Lyons 103. Contact 
the Clearinghouse at 703-742-7791 with questions. 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



19 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



The University: Policies and Procedures 

Admission- In-Transfer 

Transfer admission applications are available to students who 
have successfully completed three or more transferable courses at a 
regionally accredited college or university. Transfer students must have 
a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 to be considered for 
admission. Competitive applicants have a 3.5-3.7 cumulative grade 
point average. In 2000, the average cumulative grade point average for 
admitted transfer students was 3.65. Students are encouraged to finish 
one full year of studies before seeking admission-in-transfer. 

All candidates for admission-in-transfer should complete the 
Common Application, all Boston College supplemental application 
forms, and submit the $55 application fee. All portions of the 
Transfer Application can be found in the Transfer Undergraduate 
Bulletin or on the Internet. Please note that a Boston College Dean's 
Certification Form must be submitted for every undergraduate insti- 
tution attended full-time by the applicant. Additional copies of this 
form may be obtained by calling the Boston College Transfer Office 
at 617-552-3295 or from BC's web site. 

Transfer students must also submit the following: an official 
high school transcript, official reports of standardized test scores and 
official transcript(s) of all courses taken at other colleges and univer- 
sities. Transcripts must be sent directly to Boston College by the 
sending institution. Transcripts issued to students will not be accept- 
ed. Fall candidates will be notified of action taken on their applica- 
tions between April 15 and June 1. Spring candidates will be noti- 
fied between November 30 and December 25. 

Transfer of Credit 

The unit of credit at Boston College is the semester hour. Most 
courses earn three semester hours of credit; lab sciences usually earn 
four semester hours of credit. In order to be eligible for Boston College 
transfer credit, courses must have earned at least three semester hours 
or an equivalent number of credits (e.g., four quarter hours). 

Courses not presented for review and evaluation at the time of 
application will not be accepted for credit at a later date. 

No credit will be granted for internships, field experiences, 
practica, or independent study. 

Grade point averages do not transfer with students. A new 
grade point average begins with the commencement of a student's 
career at the University, and reflects only work completed as a full 
time undergraduate at Boston College. 

Courses taken during the summer prior to enrollment at 
Boston College must be approved in advance by the Office of 
Transfer Admission to avoid difficulty in the transfer of credits. After 
enrollment at Boston College, all summer courses must be approved 
in advance by the appropriate deans. 

Date of Graduation 

A transfer student's date of graduation is determined by the 
number of courses accepted in transfer and the number of Boston 
College semesters these courses satisfy. The normal academic load 
for undergraduates is 5 courses per semester (4 for seniors). Thus, 
students are expected to have completed 1 courses at the end of one 
year, 20 at the end of two years, etc. In determining a transfer stu- 
dent's date of graduation, leeway of 2 courses is allowed without loss 
of status. For example, students completing 8 to 10 transferable 
courses are accepted as first semester sophomores. 

Students may not accelerate the date of graduation stated in the 
acceptance letter, with the following exception: students who enter 
Boston College after three or four semesters at a school where the nor- 



Undergraduate Admission 

Admission Information 

Boston College is an academic community whose doors are 
open to men and women regardless of race, color, national origin, 
sex, religion, age, or handicap. 

Boston College seeks to maintain an undergraduate student 
body that represents a broad variety of abilities, backgrounds, and 
interests. In selecting students, therefore, the Committee on 
Admission looks for demonstrated evidence of academic ability, intel- 
lectual curiosity, strength of character, motivation, energy, and 
promise for personal growth and development. Requests for financial 
aid do not affect decisions on admission. Application forms and infor- 
mation bulletins may be obtained from the Office of Undergraduate 
Admission, Boston College, 140 Commonwealth Avenue, Devlin 
Hall Room 208, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467-3809. 

Admission from Secondary School 

While specific courses are not required, the Office of 
Undergraduate Admission recommends that students pursue a 
strong college preparatory program that includes four units of 
English, mathematics, social studies, and foreign language, as well as 
four units of a lab science. Such a program provides a solid founda- 
tion for high quality college work, as well as a stronger application 
in a highly selective admission process. 

Standardized Testing 

Students must choose one of two options to satisfy the stan- 
dardized testing requirement. 

• The SAT I and three (3) SAT II subject tests (Writing, 
Mathematics I or II C, and a third test of the student's 
choice) 

• The American College Test (ACT) 
All standardized test results are used in the admission process. 

Applicants are required to take all standardized tests no later than the 
November administration date of their senior year for Early Action 
and by December of their senior year for Regular Decision. 

Domestic students for whom English is not a first language 
may elect to take the English Language Proficiency Test (E.L.P.T.). 
The Committee on Admission will select the best combination of 
test scores when evaluating an application. International students for 
whom English is not a first language are required to submit the Test 
of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) results. 

Application Procedures 

Regular Freshman Admission 

Students applying to Boston College should submit the Boston 
College Supplemental Application for Admission and the Common 
Application along with the $55 application fee no later than January 
2. Both applications are available in the Undergraduate Admission 
Bulletin or on the Internet. Candidates are notified of action taken 
on their applications between April 1 and April 15. 

Early Action 

Superior students who are seriously considering Boston College 
may want to apply through the Early Action Program. Early Action 
at Boston College is significantly more selective than Regular 
Decision. This would necessitate submitting the completed Boston 
College Supplemental Application and Common Application no 
later than November 1. Candidates will learn of the Admission 
Committee decision before December 25, but they will have the 
same deadline (May 1) as the other candidates to reserve their places. 



20 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



mal academic program is 8 courses per year rather than 10, and who 
experience a loss of one semester in their status. If students have attend- 
ed only one school prior to Boston College and the loss of status is due 
solely to differences between academic systems, students will be allowed 
to make up their status and graduate with their class. Any loss of status 
incurred by non-transferable courses may not be regained. 

Please consult the Undergraduate Admission Bulletin for addi- 
tional information about admission-in-transfer. 

Residency Requirements 

There is a four-semester residency requirement; students must 
spend four semesters as full-time students and complete a minimum 
of 1 8 one-semester courses to be eligible for the degree. 

Special Students 

Only those persons who wish to be enrolled as full-time day 
students and candidates for the baccalaureate program for registered 
nurses are admitted by the Office of Undergraduate Admission. 
Students in the baccalaureate program for registered nurses are 
encouraged to enroll full-time, but part-time study for individual 
semesters may be arranged by permission of the Dean of the Connell 
School of Nursing. All other students wishing to attend Boston 
College on a part-time basis, for either day or evening classes, should 
contact the Dean of the College of Advancing Studies, McGuinn 
100, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467. 

Advanced Placement 

Boston College participates in the Advanced Placement 
Program of the College Entrance Examination Board. Applicants 
interested in advanced placement should make arrangements to take 
the Advanced Placement examinations given by the CEEB in May 
of each year. The examinations may be taken during sophomore, 
junior, or senior year of high school. Official score reports must be 
sent directly to Boston College from the Educational Testing Service. 
Advanced placement is awarded in specific areas as noted below. 

NB: Qualifying A. P. scores help students to place out of Core 
requirements, but students are not granted course credit. However, 
if a student earns a minimum of 18 A. P. units, he/she may be eligi- 
ble for Advanced Standing and graduate early. Students wishing to 
pursue the option should be in touch with their deans at the end of 
their first semester at Boston College. 

English: Students receiving a 3 on the A.P English Language 
exam are required to take one semester of the Literature Core 
requirement. Students receiving a 3 on the A.P. English Literature 
exam are required to take one semester of the Writing Core require- 
ment. Students who receive a 4 or 5 on either English A.P. exam are 
considered to have fulfilled both the Literature and Writing Core 
requirements. 

History: Students receiving a 4 or 5 on the A.P. exam in 
American History are considered to have fulfilled the American 
Civilization requirement for the History major. The A.P. exam in 
American History does not fulfill the History Core requirement of 
two European history courses. Students receiving a score of 4 or 5 on 
the A.P. exam in European History are considered to have fulfilled 
the Core requirement in History. 

Natural Science: Students receiving a 4 or 5 on the A.P. exams 
in Biology, Chemistry or Physics are considered to have fulfilled the 
Core requirement in Natural Science. Students receiving a 4 or 5 on 
the Environmental Science exam are considered to have fulfilled half 
of the Natural Science Core requirement. 

Social Science: Students receiving a 4 or 5 on the A.P. exam in 
either U.S. Government and Politics, Comparative Government and 
Politics, Microeconomics or Macroeconomics are considered to have 
fulfilled half the Social Science requirement. Students who have 



received a 4 or 5 on two of the preceding exams are considered to have 
fulfilled the Core requirement in Social Science. Qualifying scores on 
the Psychology A.P. exam do not fulfill any Core requirements at BC. 

Mathematics: Students receiving a score of 4 or 5 on the AB 
Calculus exam, or a 3 or more on the BC Calculus exam, are con- 
sidered to have fulfilled the Core requirement in mathematics. 
Students entering CSOM who have received a score of 4 or 5 on the 
A.P. Statistics exam are considered to have fulfilled the CSOM 
Statistics requirement. 

Arts: Students receiving a score of 3 or more on the Art History 
or the Studio Art exam are considered to have fulfilled the Core 
requirement in Arts. 

Computer Science: The A.P. exam in Computer Science does 
not fulfill Core requirements, however, elective equivalency will be 
earned with scores of 4 or 5. 

Psychology Majors: A scoK of 4 or 5 on the A.P. Psychology exam- 
ination can be substituted for PS 1 11 Introductory Psychology II, but 
students substituting an A.P exam score for PS 1 1 1 are required to 
take an additional 200-level psychology course (for a total of four 
courses at the 200-level) to complete their major in Psychology. 

Arts and Sciences and CSOM Foreign Language Proficiency 
Requirement: Students receiving a score of 3 or better on the A.P. 
French, German, or Spanish exam (4 or 5 on the A.P. Latin or A.P. 
Greek exams) or a score of 500 or better on the SAT II foreign lan- 
guage exam (600 or better in Latin or Greek) have fulfilled the lan- 
guage proficiency requirement. 

Advanced placement can also be earned for college courses 
completed at an accredited institution prior to enrollment at Boston 
College in which the student has earned a grade of C or better. 
Official college transcripts of these courses should be forwarded to 
the Undergraduate Admission Office by August 1 . 

All students must complete a minimum of 9 Core courses at 
Boston College. Thirty-eight (38) courses will still be required for 
graduation unless exempted by a dean. Should a student earn the 
equivalent of 1 8 or more credits — whether through superior perfor- 
mance on a minimum of three A.P. tests or through acceptance of at 
least six three-credit courses or any combination of these two meth- 
ods — he or she will be eligible for advanced standing and the cours- 
es may be used for degree credit. 

AHANA Student Information 

AHANA is an acronym for African-American, Hispanic, Asian, 
and Native American students. 

Fostering diversity is an important part of the University's edu- 
cational mission. Boston College welcomes and encourages applica- 
tion from students of all backgrounds and cultures. 

Options Through Education Program 

Sponsored by the Office of AHANA Student Programs, this six- 
week summer residential program has as its objective the goal of equip- 
ping 40 pre-freshmen, identified by the Admission Office as being at 
an educational and economic disadvantage, with the skills necessary to 
successfully negotiate Boston Colleges curriculum. At the core of the 
program's curriculum is a focus on imparting skills in two critical areas: 
English and mathematics. In addition to a focus on academics, the pro- 
gram seeks to introduce its students to the diverse resources available at 
Boston College and in the greater Boston community. 

International Student Admission 

International students are expected to submit the same creden- 
tials (transcripts, recommendations, SAT I and II, etc.) as United 
States applicants. All documents should be submitted in English. If 
the credentials must be translated, the original must be submitted 
along with the translation. All international students whose native 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



21 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



language is not English are required to take the Test of English as a 
Foreign Language (TOEFL) exam. A minimum score of 600 on the 
paper-based test, or 250 on the computer-based test is recommend- 
ed. Students applying from British systems who are enrolled in an "A" 
level program will be considered. Applications received from stu- 
dents who have only competed the "O" levels will not be accepted. 

International Baccalaureate (IB) Credit 

Students with Higher Level passing scores of 6 or 7 earn six cred- 
its (2 courses) in Boston College's curriculum. Students who have 
taken both A. P. and LB. examinations do not receive credit/placement 
for both. Students who earn credit for LB. examination scores do not 
also fulfill Core requirements through A.P. examination scores. 

FiNANCL\L Aid 

Boston College offers a variety of assistance programs to help 
students finance their education. The Office of Student Services 
administers federal financial aid programs that include Federal 
Stafford Loans, Federal Perkins Loans, and Federal Work-Study as 
well as need-based institutional undergraduate grant and undergrad- 
uate scholarship programs, and undergraduate state scholarship and 
loan programs. 

Financial aid application materials generally become available 
in the Office of Student Services (Lyons Hall) each December for the 
following academic year. Students wishing to be considered for assis- 
tance from federal, state or institutional sources must complete all 
required forms. 

Most forms of assistance at Boston College, whether institu- 
tional, federal or state, are awarded on the basis of financial need. 
Need is defined as the difference between the total expenses of 
attending Boston College and the calculated ability of the family to 
contribute towards those expenses. Students with the greatest finan- 
cial need are given preference for most financial aid programs, and, 
thus, tend to receive larger financial aid awards. 
Application Information 

In order to be considered for need-based financial assistance, 
the following forms must be completed: 

Undergraduate 

• The Boston College Undergraduate Financial Aid 
Application/Validation Form 

• The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) 

• A complete, signed copy of student's and parents' most recent 
Federal Income Tax Return with W-2s 

• When requested, a Non-Custodial Parents' Statement and tax 
return and/or Business/Farm Supplement 

• The College Scholarship Service Profile form, if a first time 
applicant 

Undergraduate students applying for financial aid who are not 
residents of Massachusetts are expected to contact their individual 
state programs to determine if additional application materials are 
required beyond the FAFSA. 

Graduate: 

• The Boston College Graduate Financial Aid Application 

• The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) 

• A signed copy of student's (and spouse's, if married and filed 
separately) most recent Federal Income Tax Return, if selected 
for the federal verification process 

The 2002-2003 financial aid applications, including FAFSAs, 
for continuing graduate students are available at the graduate 
schools; at the John Courtney Murray, S.J. Graduate Student 
Center; and at the Office of Student Services in Lyons Hall. 
Completion of both forms are required to determine your eligibility 
for federal financial aid awards. 



NOTE: Boston College graduate institutional funds (assistant- 
ships, fellowships, grants, scholarships, stipends, and tuition remis- 
sion) are awarded by the individual graduate schools. Students who 
wish to be considered for these funds should contact the appropriate 
graduate school. It is important to note that receipt of these funds 
can affect eligibility for need-based funds. 

Graduate students are not eligible for assistance from state 
scholarship programs or from the Pell Grant Program. Students are 
expected to comply with all regulations governing the program(s) 
from which they receive assistance. 

The University's estimate of student's financial need is based on 
an analysis of the information supplied on the appropriate docu- 
ments listed above. A financial aid award or package will combine 
funds from various sources of assistance. These sources can include 
either institutional, federal or state (undergraduate only) funds and 
can be in the form of grant, loan or work. 

Several assumptions are made in determining a student's finan- 
cial aid award. A primary assumption is that the student and the 
family have the first responsibility to pay college expenses. All stu- 
dents are expected to borrow a Federal Stafford Loan each year. 
Students are also expected to work on a limited basis (10-20 hours 
per week) during the academic year. 

Financial resources are limited. It is Boston College's intent to 
use these limited resources in such a way that the greatest number of 
students will benefit. Total financial assistance received by a student 
cannot exceed total need. In the event that a student receives other, 
"outside" assistance after Boston College has awarded aid, the student 
is required to report these awards to the Office of Student Services 
and the University may be required to adjust the need-based aid it is 
offering. However, it is Boston College policy that the student will 
receive primary benefit from any outside award. Thus, an outside 
award will be used first, to reduce unmet institutional need and sec- 
ond, to reduce a portion of the self-help component (work or Federal 
Perkins Loan) of a financial aid award. Only after those considera- 
tions would scholarship or grant monies possibly be affected. The 
Federal Stafford Loan is reduced last. "Outside" assistance is defined 
as any assistance awarded by any agency, department, etc., other than 
the Boston College Office of Student Services. Assistance received 
from other University departments, such as Athletics, Housing, 
Graduate departments, etc., must be incorporated into the need- 
based package and can in fact reduce that need-based award. State 
scholarships are not considered outside aid and will generally be used 
to reduce the Boston College grant or scholarship assistance. 

Students participating in the International Study Program or 
Resident Assistant (RA) programs are encouraged to check with their 
financial services associate as this program may affect receipt of finan- 
cial aid funds including Boston College scholarship or grant funds. 

Specific information on the various programs, conditions, and 
procedures, and the various financial aid application deadline dates, 
can be found in the Boston College Student Guide, the Boston 
College Financial Aid Application/Validation Form, the Boston 
College Financial Aid Award Letter, and the Financial Aid Award 
Information. Students are expected to be familiar with the contents 
of these sources as well as all other materials or documents that may 
be distributed by the Boston College Office of Student Services. 
General Information 

It is the student's responsibility to know and comply with all 
requirements and regulations of the financial aid programs in which 
they participate. Financial aid awards may be reduced or canceled if 
the requirements of the award are not met. Students receiving a 
Federal Perkins Loan and/or a Federal Nursing Student Loan are 
expected to accept responsibility for the promissory note and all 



22 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



other agreements that they sign. Students must comply with all 
Federal Work-Study dates and deadlines. A student's work-study 
award may be canceled if he or she has failed to secure a job, or is 
not on the University's payroll system by October 1 . 

All financial aid awards are made under the assumption that 
the student status (full-time, part-time, half-time, enrollment in the 
College of Advancing Studies) has not changed. Any change in the 
student's status must be reported to the Office of Student Services as 
it can affect the financial aid award. There has also been a change to 
federal policy with regard to the Withdrawal/Refund Process. 
Students receiving Federal Title IV Funds are subject to the follow- 
ing Withdrawal/Refund Process. The University and the student will 
be required to return to the federal aid programs the amount of aid 
received that was in excess of the aid "earned" for the time period 
the student remained enrolled. Students who remain enrolled 
through at least 60% of the payment period (semester) are consid- 
ered to have earned 100% of the aid received and will not owe a 
repayment of Federal Title IV grant funds. If the University returns 
funds to the Title IV aid programs, it could result in the student 
owing Boston College charges that were originally paid at the time 
of disbursement. Students may also be required to return funds 
released to them for personal expenses. Monies will be returned to 
the Title IV programs and not to recipients. Monies returned to the 
Title IV aid programs will be applied first to loans to reduce the loan 
debt of the student and/or parent borrower. 

In addition, all financial aid recipients must maintain satisfac- 
tory progress in their course of study. Satisfactory academic progress 
is defined by the dean of each school at Boston College. Students 
should check with their respective deans for this definition. If a stu- 
dent is not maintaining satisfactory academic progress, the student 
should consult with his or her dean to determine what steps must be 
taken to reestablish his or her status and, thus, eligibility to receive 
financial aid. 

Financial aid recipients have the right to appeal their financial 
aid award. However, the student should understand that Boston 
College has already awarded the best financial aid package possible 
based on the information supplied. Therefore, any appeal made 
should be based on new, additional information not already includ- 
ed in the student's original application material. An appeal should be 
made by letter to the student's financial services associate. 

When applying for financial aid, the student has the right to 
ask the following: 

• what the cost of attending is, and what the policies are on 
refunds to students who drop out. 

• what financial assistance is available, including information 
on all federal, state, local, private, and institutional financial 
aid programs. 

• what the procedures and deadlines are for submitting applica- 
tions for each available financial aid program. 

• what criteria the institution uses to select financial aid recipients. 

• how the institution determines financial need. This process 
includes how costs for tuition and fees, room and board, travel, 
books and supplies, personal and miscellaneous expenses, etc., 
are considered in the student's budget. It also includes what 
resources (such as parental contribution, other financial aid, 
student assets, etc.) are considered in the calculation of need. 

• how much of the student's financial need, as determined by 
the institution, has been met. Students also have the right to 
request an explanation of each type of aid, and the amount of 
each, in their financial aid award package. 

• students receiving loans have the right to know what the 
interest rate is, the total amount that must be repaid, the 



length of time given to repay the loan, when repayment must 
start, and any cancellation and deferment provisions that 
apply. Students offered a work-study job have the right to 
know what kind of job it is, what hours are expected, what 
the duties will be, what the rate of pay will be, and how and 
when they will be paid. 
A student also has the responsibility to: 

• pay special attention to his or her application for student 
financial aid, complete it accurately, and submit it on time to 
the right place. Errors can delay the receipt of the financial 
aid package. 

• provide all additional information requested by either the 
Office of Student Services or the agency to which the applica- 
tion was submitted. 

• read and understand all forms he or she is asked to sign, and 
keep copies of them. 

• perform in a satisfactory manner the work that is agreed upon 
in accepting a federal work-study job. 

• know and comply with the deadlines for applications or reap- 
plications for financial aid. 

• know and comply with the College's refund procedures. 

• notify the Office of Student Services and the lender of a loan 
(i.e.. Federal Stafford Loan) of any change in name, address, 
or school status. 

• complete the Entrance Interview process if he or she is a new 
loan borrower. 

• complete the Exit Interview process prior to withdrawal or 
graduation. 

Uni'versity Core Requirements 

As a Jesuit University, Boston College has as its heritage a 400- 
year tradition of concern for the integration of the intellectual, moral, 
and religious development of its students. The centerpiece of Jesuit 
education has always been a common curriculum that emphasizes the 
defining works of the humanities, sciences and social sciences. A spe- 
cial faculty committee, the University Core Development Committee 
(UCDC) , assists departments in developing the content and method- 
ology of these Core offerings. The committee also encourages the cre- 
ation of new courses and interdepartmental programs. 

Many students report that Core courses open up for them issues 
and interests of which they had been previously unaware. Such a 
broadening of horizons is exactly what the Core program is intended 
to achieve. From this more informed perspective, students are better 
equipped to make a wiser selection of a major. Students also discover 
that Core courses introduce them to the kind of thinking that coordi- 
nates what they are learning in various disciplines and relates this 
learning to the moral significance and practical direction of their lives. 

The following requirements comprise the Core curriculum and 
are required for all students entering Boston College. 

• 1 course in the Arts (Fine Arts, Music, Theatre) 

• 1 course in Cultural Diversity (The Cultural Diversity 
requirement may be fulfilled by an appropriate course taken 
to fitlfill another Core requirement, a major requirement, or 
an elective) 

• 2 courses in History (Modern History I and II) 

• 1 course in Literature (Classics, English, German Studies, 
Romance Language and Literatures, Slavic and Eastern 
Languages) 

• 1 course in Mathematics 

• 2 courses in Natural Science (Biology, Chemistry, Geology, 
Geophysics, Physics) 

• 2 courses in Philosophy 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



23 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



• 2 courses in Social Sciences (Psychology in Education, 
Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology) 

• 2 courses in Theology 

• 1 course in Writing 

First Year Experience 

The Office of First Year Experience was created in 1990 as a 
response to the perceived needs of universities to orient and monitor 
more effectively the progress of first-year and transfer students. 
Research has strongly indicated that the initial experience and the 
first months of a student's matriculation are pivotal to overall success 
in college. The First Year Experience concept at Boston College has 
a dual focus. First, to introduce the new students to the resources of 
the University so that they might maximize the integration of their 
gifts and skills with the challenge afforded them at Boston College. 
Second, to assist in the inculturation process whereby these new stu- 
dents come to understand, appreciate and act upon the uniqueness 
of Boston College as a Jesuit university in the Catholic tradition. 
The second stage is not seen as an exclusionary mark, but rather as 
a foundational and guiding philosophy which underpins the efforts 
of all in the University community. The concept of "magis," for the 
greater, is seen as a way of understanding personal development and 
service to others as integral to our pursuit of excellence. This vision 
we call Ignatian. 

The two elements of the First Year Experience practically come 
together in the first instance during the seven summer orientation ses- 
sions which extend over three days and two nights. A student program 
runs concurrently with a parent/guardian program during each session. 

During the student program, academic advising and registra- 
tion of classes along with discussion of issues concerning diversity, 
alcohol, sexuality, service, learning resources and the intellectual and 
spiritual life are discussed. The forums for discussion are designed in 
a more interactive format with the assistance of carefully selected and 
trained Orientation Leaders who are upper class students and peers. 
The components of the program are developed to inculturate spirit 
about Boston College and an acquaintance with the University's val- 
ues and its expectations for its students. 

The parent/guardian program seeks to develop themes sur- 
rounding the issues of transition and adjustment which families will 
experience as a member enters college. Likewise, the issues of com- 
munity standard surrounding alcohol, sex, diversity and academic 
performance are addressed. 

Once the academic year begins, EYE has organized programs 
aimed at continuing support for first-year students as they negotiate 
the beginning of their college career. 48EIOURS is a retreat program 
open to all first-year students who are interested in finding ways to 
take advantage of BC's intellectual, social and spiritual resources. 
On this two-day retreat, participants will hear senior student leaders 
speak personally and openly about their own college experiences, 
focusing particularly on their first-year ups and downs in regards to 
the topics of freedom and responsibility, the challenge of academics, 
co-curricular involvement, unexpected social pressures and friends 
and relationships. 

The Courage to Know: Exploring the Intellectual, Social and 
Spiritual Landscapes of the College Experience (UN 201) is a 
Cornerstone Initiative seminar that introduces first-year students to 
college life. The professor and senior student mentors will formu- 
late stimulating questions and encourage the response and opinions 
of the students in an honest and trusting environment. Assignments 
include examining various types of literature and media, including 
films, textbooks, and fictional writing. 



In essence. First Year Experience is attempting to create what 
Ernest Boyer describes as the scholarship of engagement. It does so 
uniquely in the Jesuit tradition. It does it as a first rate academic 
institution interested in the development of character and leadership 
for a more just and humane twenty-first century. 

Special Programs 

Undergraduate Faculty Research Fellows Program 

The Undergraduate Faculty Research Fellows Program enables 
students to gain firsthand experience in scholarly work by partici- 
pating with a faculty member on a research project. Faculty mem- 
bers select students, and students receive a monetary award based 
upon the scope and duration of the project. Academic credit is not 
granted through the program. All full-time undergraduates are eligi- 
ble, although a limited number of students may be supported each 
semester. Fellowships are also available for summer terms. Contact 
your dean's office for more information or inquire with faculty 
directly to express your interest in being involved in their research. 

Honors Program 

All Boston College undergraduates are required to do an 
extensive Core curriculum in the humanities and the natural and 
social sciences. The Honors Program provides students with the 
opportunity to complete most of this Core in a four-year sequence 
of courses and academic challenges that provides an integrated liber- 
al arts education of a kind one can find in few colleges or universi- 
ties. On this solid foundation a student can then build a major con- 
centration in one or more specialized disciplines. 

Center for International Partnerships and Programs 

Each year more than 700 hundred students spend either all or part 
of the year smdying abroad. Boston College administers programs in 
Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, the Caribbean, Chile, China, Cuba, 
Denmark, Ecuador, England, France, Germany, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, 
Japan, Korea, Mexico, Morocco, the Netherlands, Norway, the Philippines, 
Poland, Russia, Scodand, South Africa, Spain and Sweden. Students may 
also enroll at other approved universities abroad or in programs sponsored 
by American colleges and universities or independent organizations. 

Contact: Marian B. St. Onge, Center for International 
Partnerships and Programs. 
Australia 

Monash University 

Semester or full-year program at the 1994 Australian 
University of the Year. Undergraduate and graduate. 

University of Melbourne 

Semester or full-year program at one of Australia's most dis- 
tinguished research universities. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Murdoch University 

Semester or full-year program in Western Australia with offer- 
ings across the disciplines. Undergraduate. 

Notre Dame University 

Semester or full-year program in Fremantle with a wide range 
of courses. Undergraduate and graduate. 

University of New South Wales 

Semester or full-year program in Sydney with offerings across 
the disciplines. Undergraduate and graduate. 
Brazil 

Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro 

Semester or full-year program with course offerings in all dis- 
ciplines. Undergraduate and graduate. 



24 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



Canada 

Queen's University 

Semester or full-year program in Ontario with course offerings 
in management, economics, humanities, social sciences, physical sci- 
ences, and education. Undergraduate and graduate. 
Chile 

Catholic University of Chile 

Semester or full-year program in Santiago at Chile's premiere 
Catholic university. Undergraduate and graduate. 
China 

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology 

Semester or full-year English-language program for CSOM 
students. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Pacific Asia Conference 

Hosted by Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. 
International forum on evolving telecommunications issues. 

Peking University 

Semester or full-year program at China's most prestigious uni- 
versity. Offerings in Chinese language and culture, history, politics, 
and international business. Undergraduate and graduate. 

East China Normal University 

Semester or full-year program with courses in history, politics, 
culture, and international business. Undergraduate or graduate. 

Jesuit Universities China Program 

Semester or full-year program in Beijing focusing on Chinese 
language, culture studies, and business courses. Undergraduate only. 
Denmark 

Copenhagen University 

Semester or full-year program with course in humanities, 
social sciences, law, health science, natural science, and theology. 
Undergraduate and graduate. 

Copenhagen Business School 

Semester or full-year programs for CSOM or economics stu- 
dents. Undergraduate and graduate. 
Ecuador 

Universidad San Francisco de Quito 

Semester or full-year programs for students with Spanish-lan- 
guage skills across the disciplines, including Latin American and 
environmental studies. Undergraduate only. 
El Salvador 

Casa de la Solidaridad 

Semester program in San Salvador for students with interme- 
diate Spanish proficiency. Combines academic coursework with ser- 
vice projects. Undergraduate only. 
England 

Advanced Studies in England 

Semester program (with full-year option for LSOE students) 
for American students based in Bath and run in collaboration with 
Oxford University. Undergraduate. 

King's College 

Semester or full-year program in London with course offerings 
across the disciplines including an excellent pre-medical program. 
Graduate law program examines international and comparative law. 
Undergraduate and graduate. 

Lancaster University 

Semester or full-year program across the disciplines including 
excellent courses in the sciences for pre-medical students. 
Undergraduate and graduate. 

London School of Economics 

Full-year program in social sciences, management, and eco- 
nomic history. Undergraduate and graduate. 



Oxford University 

Full-year program for A&S students at Manchester College, 
Mansfield College, St. Edmund Hall, and Pembroke College. 
Undergraduate and graduate. 

Queen Mary 

Semester or full-year program at the University of London's 
East End campus for A&S students. Undergraduate and graduate. 

University College London 

Semester or full-year program at the University of London's 
top-ranked college in central London. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Royal Holloway 

Semester or full-year program at one of the largest colleges of 
the University of London with a wide range of course offerings. 
Undergraduate and graduate. 
France 

The Bordeaux School of Business 

Semester or full-year program for business students at one of 
the oldest and largest business schools in France. Undergraduate or 
graduate. 

The University of Paris 

Semester or full-year program with a wide curriculum at more 
than a dozen campuses. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Political Science Institute (Sciences Po) 

Spring semester or full-year program in Paris at France's pre- 
miere institute for the study of political science, international stud- 
ies, and business. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Institut Catholique 

Semester or fliU-year program in Paris offering excellent courses 
particularly in theology and philosophy. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Institute of Management and Business Administration Paris (IMBAP) 

Fall or spring semester program for management students. 
Curriculum in French and in English. Undergraduate only. 

Critical/Contemporary French Studies Paris 

Semester or full-year interdisciplinary program focusing on 
contemporary critical French thought. Undergraduate and graduate. 

BC in Paris 

Semester or full-year program based in either the University of 
Paris or the Institut Catholique. Offers a wide range of disciplines. 
Undergraduate and graduate. 

University of Strasbourg 

Semester or full-year exchanges with the Political Science and 
Management Institutes at Robert Schuman University as well as 
with the University Marc Bloch. Undergraduate and graduate. 
Germany 

Dresden University 

Spring semester or full-year program with course offerings 
across the disciplines. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Eichstatt Catholic University 

Spring semester or full-year program with offerings in arts and 
sciences, business and education. Undergraduate and graduate. 

StuttggartI Heidelberg 

Spring semester program for business students. Two-month 
intensive language program at the University of Heidelberg; students 
then move to Stuttgart to enroll in business courses at the University 
of Cooperative Education. Undergraduate only. 
Greece 

University of Athens 

Semester or full-year program with course offerings in 
Modern Greek and English in a broad range of disciplines. 
Undergraduate and graduate. 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



25 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



University ofThessaloniki 

Semester or full-year program with course offerings in modern 
Greek and English in a broad range of disciplines. Undergraduate 
and graduate. 
Ireland 

Queen's University Belfast 

Semester or full-year program across the disciplines in 
Northern Ireland's most distinguished university. Undergraduate and 
graduate. 

University of Ulster 

Semester or full-year program offering wide range of disci- 
plines throughout the University's four campuses. Undergraduate 
and graduate. 

University College Cork 

Fall semester or full-year program offering humanities, man- 
agement, science, and law. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Trinity College Dublin 

Full-year program in management and the humanities at one 
of Europe's oldest and most famous institutions. Undergraduate and 
graduate. 

University College Dublin 

Semester or full-year program (fall or full-year for A&S) with 
offerings across the disciplines and at every level. Undergraduate and 
graduate. 

National University of Ireland Maynooth 

Semester or full-year program in a campus environment out- 
side of Dublin. Undergraduate and graduate. 

National University of Ireland Galway 

Semester or full-year program (fall or full-year for A&S) with 
course offerings across the disciplines. Undergraduate and graduate. 
Israel 

Hebrew University 

Semester or full-year program with the Rothberg International 
School in Jerusalem. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Italy 

Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies 

Semester program in Rome for students in classics, history, 
archaeology, or art history. Undergraduate. 

University of Parma 

Semester or full-year program for students with courses in 
English and Italian. Undergraduate and graduate. 
Japan 

Sophia University Tokyo 

Spring semester or full-year program in Tokyo with course 
offerings in English covering a wide range of disciplines. 
Undergraduate and graduate. 
Korea 

Sogang University Seoul 

Semester or full-year program offering a wide range of cours- 
es in Korean and English. Undergraduate and graduate. 
Mexico 

Iberoamercana University 

Semester or full-year program in Mexico City for students 
with post-intermediate Spanish language skills. Undergraduate. 
Morocco 

Al Akhawayn University 

Semester or full-year program in Ifrane at a new private 
English-language university. Undergraduate. 



The Netherlands 

University of Amsterdam 

Semester or full-year program with English courses available 
campus-wide. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Katholicke Universiteit Nijmegen 

Semester or full-year program in English literature and 
American Studies. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Leiden University 

Semester or full-year program offering a wide range of cours- 
es in English. Undergraduate and graduate. 
Norway 

University of Bergen 

Semester or full-year program with wide ranging curriculum 
in English. Undergraduate and graduate. 
The Philippines 

Anteneo de Manila University 

Fall semester program (or full-year by special arrangement) in 
English which combines coursework with a one-month service pro- 
ject. Undergraduate. 
Poland 

Jagiellonian University 

Semester or full-year program in politics, sociology, and Polish 
language, literature, and culture. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Russia 

BC Study Programs in Sankt-Peterhurg 

Semester or full-year program focusing on Russian literature 
and language. Undergraduate and graduate. 
Scotland 

University of Glasgow 

Semester or full-year program in business, nursing, humani- 
ties, social sciences, fine arts, and law. Undergraduate and graduate. 
South Africa 

Rhodes University 

Semester or full-year program of studies in Grahamstown for 
students across the disciplines. Undergraduate or graduate. 
Spain 

Autonoma University 

Spring semester or full-year program in Madrid offering sci- 
ence, humanities, and social sciences. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Compultense University 

Semester or full-year program in the oldest public university 
of Madrid offering all disciplines. Undergraduate or graduate. 

Universidad Carlos III 

Semester or full-year program in Madrid's newest public univer- 
sity. Course offerings across the disciplines. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Madrid Business Program: Universidad Pontificia Comillas 

Semester or full-year program for students with very strong 
Spanish language skills. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Universidad Pompeu Fabra 

Semester or full-year program in Barcelona offering courses in 
all disciplines. Undergraduate and graduate. 

ESADE 

Semester or full-year program in Barcelona for students of 
management or law. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Universidad de Deusto 

Semester or full-year of study in Spain's Basque country on 
campuses in San Sebastian and Bilbao. Undergraduate and graduate. 
Sweden 

Uppsala University 

Semester or full-year program in Sweden's elite university. 
Wide range of curricula in English. Undergraduate and graduate. 



26 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



Summer Programs 
Costa Rica 

Monteverde Institute 

A three-week summer course focusing on tiie political econo- 
my of tropical rain forest conservation. 
France 

Strasbourg Summer Institutes 

Short, non-credit program introduces students to European 
institutions, politics, and policies. 

French Language Program in Paris 

Four-week summer program designed for students with an 
intermediary level in French with the aim of enabling students to 
fulfill their foreign language requirement. 
Greece 

Tracing the Paths of Ancient and Modern Athens 

Three-week program designed to provide students with an in- 
depth understanding of the sites and museums of ancient Athens 
and its surroundings. 

Ireland 

Abbey Theatre Program 

Six-week summer theatre workshop in Dublin. Undergraduate 
and graduate. 
Italy 

Florence Summer Program 

A three-week program focusing on the Renaissance art and 
architecture in Italy. Undergraduate. 

Parma Language Program 

Three-week intensive Italian language course designed for stu- 
dents with one year of Italian. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Myth and History in the Roman World 

Three-week program in Rome and the Bay of Naples provid- 
ing an in-depth view of the mythology and history of the Roman 
World. 
Russia 

Russian language and Culture Program 

An intensive program in Russian language and culture in 
Sankt Peterburg. 
Spain 

Madrid Naturalmente: Spanish language and Culture Program 

Intensive month-long language program for students with 
intermediate level Spanish and above. Undergraduate and graduate. 

Other Opportunities 
M.B.A. Summer Experience 

International program for M.B.A. students. Destination varies 
from year to year. Graduate. 
Overseas Teaching Program 

Students perform elementary or secondary student teaching 
practicums abroad. Undergraduate and graduate. 
Presidential Scholars European Program 

This program focuses on contemporary European history and 
politics from the French perspective. Undergraduate. 
Volunteer Programs 

Short-term volunteer opportunities are available during vaca- 
tion periods in Belize, Jamaica, Mexico and Nicaragua. 
Undergraduate and graduate. 

Contact: Ted Dziak, S.J. (Chaplaincy) 



Exchange Program 

The Washington Semester Program 

This semester-long program is offered in cooperation with 
American University in Washington, D.C. Students are housed at 
American University and work in one of a number of government 
jobs arranged by the program's local directors. They also attend sem- 
inars and conduct a lengthy research project. Students completing 
this program receive one semester of academic credit. Interested stu- 
dents should contact Associate Dean Carol Hurd Green, Office of 
the Dean, College of Arts and Sciences and the Center for 
International Partnerships and Programs. 

Visit the Center for International Partnerships and Programs for 
information about BC's international programs for undergraduates, 
graduates, and faculty as well as professional opportunities abroad. 

FACHEX (Faculty and Staff Children Exchange) 
Program 

FACHEX is an undergraduate tuition remission program for 
children of full-time faculty, administrators, and staff at participat- 
ing Jesuit colleges and universities. The program is administered 
through the Benefits Office and the Dean of Enrollment 
Management Office. 

For Boston College employees, five consecutive years of full- 
time employment is required for establishing initial eligibility for the 
program. After conferring with the Benefits Office, parents and stu- 
dents should visit Boston College's FACHEX website (wvvw.bc.edu/ 
fachex) for information about participating colleges and universities, 
and for details on how to apply for FACHEX at these institutions. 

Employees at other participating institutions should ask their 
respective Benefits Offices for information on requirements for eli- 
gibility. Parents and students should then visit the Boston College 
FACHEX website to view the necessary procedures and conditions 
for FACHEX applicants. 

Pre-Professional Programs 

Prelegal Program 

Boston College offers prelegal advisement through the Pre- 
Law Advisory Board, which is composed of faculty members and 
administrators who advise students about careers in law and about 
the academic and extracurricular programs that will best prepare 
them for entry into law school. The Board in cooperation with the 
Bellarmine Law Academy (the student prelaw association) and the 
Boston College Career Center present a series of panels each year on 
different aspects of the legal profession and the law school admission 
process. Members of the Board are also available to meet individual- 
ly with students interested in law as a career whenever questions or 
concerns arise. While no particular major is preferred by law schools, 
it is recommended that students include at least some of the follow- 
ing courses in their programs of study: Logic, Mathematics, Law, 
Public Speaking, English (especially intensive writing courses). 
History, Sociology, and Political Science. You can indicate your 
interest in receiving announcements of Pre-Law panels and activities 
by registering on-line or at Student Services for the prelaw program. 
For further information, contact the Chairperson of the Prelaw 
Advisory Board, Dean Joseph Burns, Gasson 106, 617-552-3272. 

Premedical/Predental Program 

Medical, dental and veterinary schools welcome all good stu- 
dents, not just science majors. Thus, the student planning to pursue 
one of these careers may choose for his or her major field any one of 
the humanities, natural sciences, or social sciences. However, health 
professions schools expect every serious applicant to be well ground- 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



27 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



ed in the basic sciences and to be familiar, through practical experi- 
ence, with laboratory techniques. For these reasons, most medical, 
dental, or veterinary schools require one year of the following: 

• General Chemistry with lab 

• Organic Chemistry with lab 

• Introductory Biology with lab 

• Physics with lab 

• English 

In addition, one year of Mathematics is usually strongly rec- 
ommended. Some medical schools require Calculus. 

A few schools have additional required courses, such as bio- 
chemistry. Therefore, students should carefully research the specific 
requirements of the schools to which they wish to apply. 

Undergraduates who plan to enter a medical/dental/veterinary 
school the fall after they graduate should attempt to complete the 
required science/math courses by the end of their junior year. Most 
students take the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) or the 
Dental Admissions Test (DAT) in April of their junior year. The 
basic science courses are covered in these exams. Course areas also 
useful in helping prepare for the entrance exams, although not 
required, are biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and physiol- 
ogy. Note that the MCAT includes two graded essays. This is an 
indication that medical schools are increasingly interested in stu- 
dents who can communicate clearly and who also have some sophis- 
tication in areas such as medical ethics and the economics, politics, 
and culture of health care. 

Also, students who plan to enter medical/dental/veterinary 
school the fall after they graduate, should ideally file their applica- 
tion during the summer after they complete their junior year. If a 
student is a competitive candidate, he/she would then be invited for 
interviews during the fall or early winter of his/her senior year. If 
accepted, a student would begin graduate school in August/ 
September after graduating from BC. 

An increasing number of students at BC (and other institu- 
tions) feel that they would like to complete the Premedical/ 
Predental/Preveterinary Program over four, instead of three, years. 
This allows more flexibility during their undergraduate careers and 
that extra year also allows students to raise their cumulative averages 
thus increasing chances for acceptance. This is an especially good 
option if a student has had a modest performance during his/her 
freshman year. Nevertheless, this would postpone graduate studies 
by one year. The majority of students entering health professions 
graduate school do not enroll directly after graduating from college. 

The program options listed below assume that an individual 
will be applying to health professions graduate school after the 
junior year. But, as mentioned above, if a student feels that he/she 
does not need to start his/her graduate program the fall after he/she 
graduates, he/she may want to spread the required Premedical/ 
Predental/Preveterinary courses out over four, instead of three years. 
This would allow a student more flexibility during his/her under- 
graduate career, but will postpone graduate studies by one year. 
Recently, this has become an increasingly popular option at Boston 
College, as well as other institutions. 

A variety of options are available for non-science majors. They 
should plan their science and mathematics courses in relation to the 
courses required in their potential major. Introductory Biology (BI 
200-202) and its associated lab (BI 210-211) are the biology cours- 
es that non-science majors should take to fulfill health professions 
school requirements. Two program options appear below, but other 
sequences are possible: 



Option A: Non-Science Majors 
Freshman Year 

Introductory Biology (BI 200-202)* 

General Biology Lab (BI 210-211) 

General Chemistry (CH 109-110)** 

General Chemistry Lab (CH 111-112) 

Calculus (MT 100-101) or, if supported by A.P. exam or 

Mathematics Department recommendation. Calculus/ 

Biostatistics (MT 101 & BI 230) 

English Core Requirement 

Electives/Core Courses 
Sophomore Year 

Organic Chemistry (CH 231-232)*** 

Organic Chemistry Lab (CH 233-234) 

Possible Biology Elective 

Major Requirements 

Electives/Core Courses 
Junior Year 

Physics (PH 21 1-212)*** 

Physics Lab (PH 203-204) 

Possible Biology Elective 

Major Requirements 

Electives/Core Courses 
* General Chemistry (CH 109-1 10) or its equivalent is a pre- 
requisite or corequisite for Introductory Biology (BI 200-202) 

** General Chemistry (CH 109-1 10) or the honors chemistry 
courses CH 117-118 Principles of Modern Chemistry and CH 119- 
120 Modern Chemistry Laboratory — both by invitation of the 
instructor only. 

*** Organic Chemistry (CH 231-232) or Honors Organic 
Chemistry (CH 241-242) with CH 233-234 Organic Chemistry 
Laboratory. 

*** Foundations of Physics (PH 183-184) and its associated 
laboratory (PH 101-102) also fulfills health professions school 
requirements, but the Premedical Committee recommends PH 21 1- 
212 and its associated lab (PH 203-204). 
Option B: Non-Science Majors 

Another option would be to take General Chemistry Lecture 
(CH 109-1 10), General Chemistry Lab (CH 1 1 1-1 12), and Calculus 
(MT 100-101) or if supported by A.P exam or Mathematics 
Department recommendation, Calculus/Biostatistics (MT 101 & BI 
230) freshman year. During sophomore year, students may take 
Biology and Organic Chemistry, plus associated labs. Physics and 
possible Biology electives could be taken junior year. This option 
allows students to ease into premedical courses, but the disadvantage 
is that students who are not competitive probably will not know this 
fact until the end of their sophomore year. Additional options, such 
as delaying calculus until sophomore year, are possible as well. 
Program Options for Science Majors 
Biology and Biochemistry Majors 

The requirements for the Biology and Biochemistry majors at 
Boston College fulfill all of the core premedical/predental/preveteri- 
nary requirements outlined above. For a complete listing of the 
required courses for these majors, please refer to the appropriate pro- 
gram descriptions within this catalog. Biology and Biochemistry 
majors fulfill their Biology premedical laboratory requirement by 
completing BI 310-311 (Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics 
Laboratory) during sophomore year. Therefore BI 210-211 (General 
Biology Lab) is not required for Biology and Biochemistry majors. 



28 



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The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



chemistry Majors 

The requirements for the Chemistry major fijlfill most, but 
not all, of the core premedical/predental/preveterinary requirements. 
There is no biology course required for the major. Given this, most 
Chemistry majors take Introductory Biology (BI 200-202) and 
General Biology Laboratory (BI 210-211) during junior year. Please 
note that MT 102-103 is the required math sequence for Chemistry 
majors. For a complete listing of the required courses for the 
Chemistry major, please refer to the appropriate program descrip- 
tion within this catalog. 
Geology and Geophysics/Physics Majors 

The requirements in these two areas fulfill some of the core pre- 
medical/predental/preveterinary requirements. As a student plans 
his/her major, he/she should be sure that (at the very least) the chosen 
program includes the required premedical/predental/preveterinary 
core courses listed under "Non-science Majors (Option A)" above. For 
a complete listing of the required courses for these majors, please refer 
to the appropriate program descriptions within this catalog. 
Advanced Placement 

Health professions graduate schools vary in their attitudes 
toward advanced placement, so we suggest that students contact 
individual schools if they have questions concerning the policy at 
specific institutions. 

Guidelines: If a student has received advanced placement in a 
science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics), most medical schools will 
accept this as long as he/she takes an equivalent number of courses 
(and laboratories) at a more advanced level within that discipline. If 
he/she has received advanced placement in Mathematics, most 
schools will accept this and will either grant him/her one or two 
semesters credit for Mathematics. Regardless of whether or not stu- 
dents receive advanced placement in English, we strongly recom- 
mend that they take two English courses while in college. 

Please keep in mind that premedical/predental/preveterinary 
requirements may or may not coincide with the requirements of a 
major, so if you are considering taking advantage of Advanced 
Placement, check with the Premedical Office and your proposed 
major department. Also, if a student arrives at Boston College with 
advanced placement in mathematics, the Mathematics Department 
may recommend he/she begin by taking a higher level mathematics 
course. Please keep in mind that this is only a recommendation. 
Students who think that their background is insufficient should feel 
free to "drop down" to a lower level course (e.g., MT 100) before the 
drop/add period ends. 

There are clearly pluses and minuses to taking advantage of 
advanced placement opportunities. On the plus side, it allows stu- 
dents to get more quickly involved in intellectually challenging 
upper level courses. On the negative side, freshman year is often a 
significant period of adjustment. This, combined with the highly 
competitive nature of health professions graduate school admissions, 
may argue for extra careful course planning during freshman year. 
Further Information 

Incoming freshmen who wish to register for the Premedical, 
Predental, or Preveterinary Program, should fill out the appropriate 
forms at orientation. A very important orientation meeting will be 
held during the first week of classes for all incoming students inter- 
ested in the program. At this meeting. Freshman Advising Packets 
will be distributed. 

Any sophomores, juniors, or seniors who are interested in the 
Premedical, Predental, or Preveterinary Program should stop by the 
Premedical Office to register and pick up an Advising Packet. 

Dr Robert Wolff is the Director of the Premedical/Predental 
Program, and Laura Coughlan is the Assistant Director. Both can be 



reached by calling 617-552-4663, or via email at premed@bc.edu. 
Additionally, detailed Premedical Advising Packets are available in 
the Premedical Office. 

PULSE Program 

See full description in the Philosophy Department. 

Presidential Scholars Program 

The Presidential Scholars Program is a University-wide, four- 
year co-curricular honors program that uniquely expresses the Jesuit 
heritage of Boston College. Approximately fifteen incoming fresh- 
men are chosen each year from the top 1 -2% of the national pool of 
students applying for Early Action admission to Boston College. 
Students are selected on the basis of superior academic achievement 
and promise, leadership potential, and a demonstrated commitment 
to service to society. The program offers these extraordinary individ- 
uals the richest academic experience available at Boston College, one 
that encourages the pursuit of excellence both within and beyond 
the university walls. 

In addition to enrollment in one of the University's several 
honors programs. Scholars are introduced through an Evening 
Speaker series during the academic year to leaders from a wide vari- 
ety of fields including the arts, business, education, government, law, 
medicine and social service who share their experiences and insights 
on important issues facing contemporary society. These speakers 
serve as sources of information on educational and career possibilities; 
as role models for creating and balancing meaningful work, family 
and community involvement; and as potential mentors. A comple- 
mentary series of workshops ("Leadership 101 ") offers advice and 
training in practical skills to help Scholars realize their personal and 
professional goals, including time management, resume develop- 
ment, interviewing skills, fellowship application, stress reduction, and 
others. 

In the summers. Scholars are challenged to test and apply 
what they have learned at Boston College to the world beyond the 
campus by participating in experiential learning programs focusing 
on community service (after the first year), international study and 
travel (after the second year), and professional internship (after the 
third year) . 

Through this carefully balanced combination of academic 
rigor and co-curricular opportunities and challenges, the Presidential 
Scholars Program seeks to develop exceptional scholars and leaders 
for the Boston College community and far beyond. 

University Capstone Courses 

The University Capstone Program helps students to "cap off" 
their BC experience by a review of their BC education and by a pre- 
view of their major life commitments after college. Capstone offers 
several integrative seminars each semester for seniors and second- 
semester juniors in all schools. The Capstone seminars address the 
struggle to integrate four crucial areas of life: work, relationships, 
society, and spirituality. Capstone seminars are taught by faculty from 
various schools and departments within Boston College, and are lim- 
ited to 15 to 20 students. See the "University Courses" section. 

Reserve Officers Training Program 

Air Force Reserve Officer Training Program 

Through a cross-enrolled program with Boston University, 
interested Boston College students may participate in the Air Force 
Reserve Oflficer Training Corps Program. Scholarships (full and par- 
tial) are available to qualified students for four, three or two years 
and include tuition (full or partial), books, fees, and $250-400 per 
school month stipend depending on year in school. Freshmen and 
Sophomores can compete for two and three-year scholarships, some 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



29 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



of which would cover full tuition, others which cover $15,000 per 
academic year. Academic specialties for scholarships include any 
majors. All training, drills and classes are held at the BU campus. 
Service obligations are one year for each scholarship year (active 
duty) while pilots are obligated for eight years active duty after com- 
pletion of flight school. To obtain further information, contact 
Associate Dean for Student Development D. Michael Ryan, 617- 
552-3470, or the Department of Aerospace Studies, Boston 
University, 617-353-4705. 

Army Reserve Officers Training Program 

The U.S. Army offers the Reserve Officers Training Corps 
(ROTC) program in cooperation with Northeastern University. 
Boston College students take most classes and the majority of train- 
ing on the Chestnut Hill campus. Basic Course (Freshmen/ 
Sophomore) classes are one hour per week. Advanced Course 
(Junior/Senior) classes are two hours per week and require addition- 
al lab work. Upon graduation, ROTC students receive a commission 
of Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. 
Scholarship and Financial Support: 

Some four-year and a limited number of two- and three-year 
ROTC scholarships are available for interested, qualified, selected 
students. A limited number of three- and four-year scholarships are 
available strictly for students in the Connell School of Nursing 
through the Partnership in Nursing Education program (617-552- 
4274). Advanced Course and scholarship students receive stipends 
of between $250-400 per school month, depending on the year in 
school. Scholarship students receive 100% tuition payment and 
$600 annually for fees, books, supplies and equipment. Boston 
College also awards additional incentives for ROTC scholarship stu- 
dents. For more details, contact the Department of Military Science 
Extension Center at Boston College (Carney Hall 25), 617-552- 
3230, or refer questions to the Office for Student Development, 
Associate Dean D. Michael Ryan, 617-552-3470. 

Navy Reserve Officer Training 

Qualified BC students may cross enroll in Navy Reserve 
Officer Training (and the Marine Corps Option) at Boston 
University. Three- and four-year programs exist with possible schol- 
arships (full tuition, some books/fees expenses, but no room and 
board, with a $250-400 per school month stipend depending on 
year in school). All classes and drills are held at Boston University. 
Scholarship students incur an active duty service obligation. For fur- 
ther information, please contact Associate Dean for Student 
Development, Michael Ryan, 617-552-3470, or the Department of 
Naval Sciences, Boston University, 617-353-4232. 

Marine Corps Platoon Leaders' Class 

Available in connection with the Marine Officers Selection 
Office, Boston, the PLC Program is open to qualified freshmen, 
sophomores and juniors. No formal classes or training takes place 
during the academic year. 

Student/candidates attend Officer Candidate School 
(Quantico, VA) training either in two 6-week sessions (male fresh- 
men/sophomores) or one 10-week session (male and female 
juniors/seniors). Pay and expenses are received during training. No 
commitment to the USMC is incurred after OCS until a degree is 
awarded and a Second Lieutenant's commission issued. Service 
obligations are then 3 1/2 years active duty or longer if aviation posi- 
tions. Student/candidates may drop from the program at any time 
prior to commissioning. For more information, contact the Marine 
Officer Selection Office, Boston, at 617-451-3012. 



Academic Integrity 

The pursuit of knowledge can proceed only when scholars take 
responsibility and receive credit for their work. Recognition of indi- 
vidual contributions to knowledge and of the intellectual property of 
others builds trust within the university and encourages the sharing 
of ideas that is essential to scholarship. Similarly, the educational 
process requires that individuals present their own ideas and insights 
for evaluation, critique, and eventual reformulation. Presentation of 
others' work as one's own is not only intellectual dishonesty, but also 
undermines the educational process. 

Standards 

Academic integrity is violated by any dishonest act which is 
committed in an academic context including, but not restricted to 
the following: 

Cheating is the fraudulent or dishonest presentation of work. 
Cheating includes but is not limited to: 

• the use or attempted use of unauthorized aids in examinations 
or other academic exercises submitted for evaluation; 

• fabrication, falsification or misrepresentation of data, results, 
sources for papers or reports, or in clinical practice, as in 
reporting experiments, measurements, statistical analyses, 
tests, or other studies never performed; manipulating or alter- 
ing data or other manifestations of research to achieve a 
desired result; selective reporting, including the deliberate 
suppression of conflicting or unwanted data; 

• falsification of papers, official records, or reports; 

• copying from another student's work; 

• actions that destroy or alter the work of another student; 

• unauthorized cooperation in completing assignments or dur- 
ing an examination; 

• the use of purchased essays or term papers, or of purchased 
preparatory research for such papers; 

• submission of the same written work in more than one course 
without prior written approval from the instructors involved; 

• dishonesty in requests for make-up exams, for extensions of 
deadlines for submitting papers, and in any other matter 
relating to a course. 

Plagiarism is the deliberate act of taking the words, ideas, data, 
illustrations, or statements of another person or source, and present- 
ing them as one's own. Each student is responsible for learning and 
using proper methods of paraphrasing and footnoting, quotation, 
and other forms of citation, to ensure that the original author, speak- 
er, illustrator, or source of the material used is clearly acknowledged. 

Other breaches of academic integrity include: 

• the misrepresentation of one's own or another's identity for 
academic purposes; 

• the misrepresentation of material facts or circumstances in 
relation to examinations, papers, or other evaluative activities; 

• the sale of papers, essays, or research for fraudulent use; 

• the alteration or falsification of official University records; 

• the unauthorized use of University academic facilities or 
equipment, including computer accounts and files; 

• the unauthorized recording, sale, purchase, or use of academic 
lectures, academic computer software, or other instructional 
materials; 

• the expropriation or abuse of ideas and preliminary data 
obtained during the process of editorial or peer review of 
work submitted to journals, or in proposals for funding by 
agency panels or by internal University committees; 

• the expropriation and/or inappropriate dissemination of per- 
sonally-identifying human subject data; 



30 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



• the unauthorized removal, mutilation, or deliberate conceal- 
ment of materials in University libraries, media, or academic 
resource centers. 

Collusion is defined as assistance or an attempt to assist anoth- 
er student in an act of academic dishonesty. Collusion is distinct 
from collaborative learning, which may be a valuable component of 
students' scholarly development. Acceptable levels of collaboration 
vary in different courses, and students are expected to consult with 
their instructor if they are uncertain whether their cooperative activ- 
ities are acceptable. 

Promoting Academic Integrity: Roles of Community 
Members 

Student Roles in Maintaining Academic Integrity 

Students have a responsibility to maintain high standards of 
academic integrity in their own work, and thereby to maintain the 
integrity of their degree. It is their responsibility to be familiar with, 
and understand, the University policy on academic integrity. 

Students who become aware of a violation of academic integri- 
ty by a fellow student should respond in one of the following ways. 

• Students may discuss their concerns with the student whom 
they suspect of a violation. Direct contact by another student 
may be the best means of resolving the problem. Repeated 
demonstration of student concern for academic integrity will 
in the long run build a peer-regulated community. 

• If the incident is a major violation or part of a repeated pattern 
of violations, students should bring their concerns to the atten- 
tion of the instructor, or to the appropriate department chair- 
person or associate dean. Suspected violations by students 
reported to members of the faculty or to an associate dean will 
be handled according to the procedures set forth below. 
Students who have serious concern that a faculty member is not 

living up to his or her responsibility to safeguard and promote acad- 
emic integrity should speak with the faculty member directly, or 
should bring their concern to the attention of the department chair- 
person or associate dean. 
Faculty Roles in Fostering Academic Integrity 

Faculty members should provide students with a positive envi- 
ronment for learning and intellectual growth and, by their words 
and actions, promote conditions that foster academic integrity. 

Faculty should be concerned about the impact of their behav- 
ior on students. Students are sensitive to messages communicated in 
informal discussions and in casual faculty remarks about personal 
decisions and value judgments. Students are perhaps most sensitive 
to how responsibly faculty members fulfill their obligations to them 
in the careful preparation of classes, in the serious evaluation of stu- 
dent achievement, and in their genuine interest in and availability to 
students. 

Faculty should promote academic integrity in the following 
specific ways. 

• At the beginning of each course, instructors should discuss 
academic integrity in order to promote an ongoing dialogue 
about academic integrity and to set the tone and establish 
guidelines for academic integrity within the context of the 
course, e.g., the extent to which collaborative work is appro- 
priate. Where relevant, instructors should discuss why, when, 
and how students must cite sources in their written work. 

• Instructors should provide students with a written syllabus 
that states course requirements and, when available, examina- 
tion dates and times. 

• Instructors are encouraged to prepare new examinations and 
assignments where appropriate each semester in order to 



ensure that no student obtains an unfair advantage over his or 
her classmates by reviewing exams or assignments from prior 
semesters. If previous examinations are available to some stu- 
dents, faculty members should insure that all students in the 
course have similar access. Course examinations should be 
designed to minimize the possibility of cheating, and course 
paper assignments should be designed to minimize the possi- 
bility of plagiarism. 

• Proctors should be present at all examinations, including the 
final examination, and should provide students with an envi- 
ronment that encourages honesty and prevents dishonesty. 

• Faculty should be careful to respect students' intellectual prop- 
erty and the confidentiality of student academic information. 

• Assignment of grades, which is the sole responsibility of the 
instructor, should be awarded in a manner fair to all students. 

Academic Deans 

Academic deans have overall responsibility for academic 
integrity within their schools. In particular, deans' responsibilities 
include the following: 

• promoting an environment where academic integrity is a pri- 
ority for both students and faculty, 

• ensuring that students who are honest are not placed at an 
unfair disadvantage, and 

• establishing procedures to adjudicate charges of academic dis- 
honesty and to protect the rights of all parties. 

Procedures 

In each school a Committee on Academic Integrity with both 
faculty and student members is to be constituted annually. 

When a faculty member determines that a student's work vio- 
lates the standards of academic integrity, that faculty member should 
discuss the violation with the student and impose a penalty deemed 
appropriate to the offense, or refer the matter to the student's asso- 
ciate dean. Penalties may include resubmission of the work, a grade 
of for the work submitted, failure in the specific course compo- 
nent, or failure in the course. 

In all cases where a faculty member determines that the offense 
was not the result of a misunderstanding and elects to impose a 
penalty greater than resubmission of the work, a letter of notification 
describing the incident and the penalty is to be sent to the student's 
associate dean. 

On receipt of such a notification the associate dean will notify 
the student of the allegation and the penalty, and will retain a record 
of the incident in a confidential file in the Dean's office. 

Each reported violation of the standards of academic integrity 
will be reviewed by the Committee on Academic Integrity of the stu- 
dent's school. In cases involving students from more than one 
school, or students in joint or dual degree programs, the 
Committees on Academic Integrity of the pertinent schools will 
cooperate in their review. 

A board chosen by the chairperson of the Committee on 
Academic Integrity from the full Committee will be assigned to each 
case, with one of the faculty members as chairperson of the review 
board. The associate dean will serve as a non-voting administrative 
resource, and will maintain the Committee's record of notifications 
and relevant materials. 

The faculty member bringing the accusation and the student 
will be notified that the case is under review by the Academic 
Integrity Committee. The student will be given an opportunity to 
respond to the faculty member's notification letter in writing. The 
board at its discretion may interview any individual with knowledge 
pertinent to the case. 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



31 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



The board will decide a case by simple majority vote, and the 
associate dean will convey its findings as to responsibility and rec- 
ommended sanction to the faculty member and the student. The 
associate dean will compile a complete file of each case, to be kept 
confidential in the Dean's office. Files on students found not respon- 
sible will be destroyed immediately. 

Penalties for students found responsible for violations will 
depend upon the seriousness and circumstances of the violation, the 
degree of premeditation involved, and the student's previous record 
of such violations. Penalties will be appropriate to the offense, and 
may include university probation, suspension, or permanent expul- 
sion. The files of only those cases that result in one of these three 
penalties will become part of a student's academic record and only 
such offenses will be reportable to graduate and professional schools. 
Cases in which the student is deemed responsible for the offense but 
in which the penalty is less than academic probation, suspension, or 
expulsion are kept in a confidential file in the Dean's office until the 
student graduates. 

Appeal of the board's decision may be made by written request 
to the Dean of the school not later than ten days following notice of 
the board's decision, and the Dean's decision will be final. 

Academic Regulations 

Academic Regulations are effective from September of the acade- 
mic year printed on the cover and binding of this Catalog except where 
a different date is explicitly stated. If after a student has withdrawn 
from Boston College, there have been changes in the Academic 
Regidations, and if the student is subsequently readmitted to Boston 
College, the Academic Regulations in effect at the time of return apply. 

Academic Grievances 

Any student who believes he or she has been treated unfairly in 
academic matters should consult with the Chairperson of the 
Undergraduate/Graduate department or his/her Associate Dean to 
discuss the situation and to obtain information about relevant griev- 
ance procedures. 

Academic Record 

A record of each student's academic work is prepared and main- 
tained permanently by the Office of Student Services. While cumu- 
lative averages for academic majors are made available to undergrad- 
uate students who are currently enrolled, these averages are not 
maintained as part of a student's academic record. The student's 
semester averages and final overall cumulative average appear on the 
academic record. 

No cumulative average is maintained for students in the 
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. 

Note: Graduate students in the Lynch School of Education and 
the Connell School of Nursing who entered their degree program 
prior to June 1 994 will not have a cumulative average maintained. 

Acceleration — Undergraduate 

After being in residence for at least three semesters, and at least 
two full semesters prior to the proposed date of graduation, full-time 
undergraduate students may apply to the Associate Dean to acceler- 
ate their degree program by one or two semesters. Students must 
present a minimum cumulative average of 3.2. They will be consid- 
ered for approval only for exceptional reasons. In accordance with 
University policies governing accelerated programs of study, the fol- 
lowing will also be applicable: 

• Summer courses intended for acceleration must be taken at 
Boston College and must be authorized in advance by an 
Associate Dean. 

• Overload courses taken for acceleration will carry an extra 



tuition charge. This includes a fifth course taken during 
senior year. No additional fee will be assessed for extra courses 
taken for enrichment purposes only. 

• Students transferring into Boston College with first semester 
sophomore status or above are not eligible to accelerate their 
program of study. 

• A transfer student's date of graduation is determined by the 
number of courses accepted in transfer and the number of 
Boston College semesters these courses satisfy. Students may 
not accelerate the date of graduation stated in the admission 
offer. Exceptions may be granted by academic deans for stu- 
dents who have attended only one school prior to Boston 
College and have lost status because of differences in academ- 
ic systems. Any loss of status incurred or worsened by poor 
grades or withdrawals may not be regained. 

Attendance 

Students are expected to attend classes regularly, take tests, and 
submit papers and other work at the times specified by the professor 
on the course syllabus. Students who are absent repeatedly from class 
or practica will be evaluated by faculty responsible for the course to 
ascertain their ability to achieve the course objectives and to contin- 
ue in the course. Professors may include, as part of the semester's 
grades, marks for the quality and quantity of the student's participa- 
tion in class. 

Professors will announce, reasonably well in advance, tests and 
examinations based on material covered in class lectures and discus- 
sions, as well as other assigned material. A student who is absent 
from class on the day of a previously announced examination includ- 
ing the final examination is not entitled, as a matter of right, to make 
up what was missed. The professor involved is free to decide whether 
a make-up will be allowed. 

A student who is absent from class is responsible for obtain- 
ing knowledge of what happened in class, especially information 
about announced tests, papers, or other assignments. 

In cases of prolonged absence the student or a family member 
should communicate with the student's Associate Dean as soon as 
the prospect of extended absence becomes clear. The academic 
arrangements for the student's return to classes should be made with 
the Associate Dean's Office as soon as the student's health and other 
circumstances permit. 

Absences for Religious Reasons 

Any student who is unable, because of his/her religious beliefs, 
to attend classes or to participate in any examination, study, or work 
requirement on a particular day shall be excused from any such 
examination, or study or work requirement, and shall be provided 
with an opportunity to makeup such examination, study or work 
requirement that may have been missed because of such absence on 
any particular day. However, such makeup examination or work 
shall not create an unreasonable burden upon the University. No fees 
will be charged and no adverse or prejudicial effects shall result to 
any student who is absent for religious reasons. 

Audits 

Undergraduate 

Undergraduate students may not audit a course with the 
exception of undergraduates in the College of Advancing Studies. 
Graduate 

Students in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and the 
Connell Graduate School of Nursing may register for an audit on- 
line. Lynch School of Education, Carroll Graduate School of 
Management, Law School, and Graduate School of Social Work stu- 



32 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



dents must consult the Associate Dean's Office before they can audit 
a course. Graduate College of Advancing Studies students may not 
audit courses. 

After the drop/add period, graduate students who wish to 
change a course from credit to audit or audit to credit must go to the 
Associate Dean's Office and complete a Graduate Course Exception 
form. Students in the Graduate School of Social Work may not 
change a course from credit to audit or audit to credit. 

Candidacy: Doctoral 

A student attains the status of a doctoral candidate by passing 
the doctoral comprehensive or qualifying examination and by satis- 
fying all departmental requirements except the dissertation. 
Doctoral candidates are required to register each semester and to pay 
a doctoral continuation fee until completion of the dissertation. 

Comprehensive Examination: Doctoral 

Doctoral students, with the exception of students in Graduate 
School of Social Work, are required to complete comprehensive exami- 
nations. Doctoral students in Graduate School of Social Work are 
required to complete qualifying examinations. Student eligibility for tak- 
ing the doctoral comprehensive or qualifying examination is determined 
by the department. Students should consiJt with their department about 
the nature of this examination and the time of administration. 

Departments use the following grading scale to record com- 
prehensive examinations: pass with distinction (PwD), pass (P), and 
fail (F); one of these three grades will be recorded on the student's 
transcript. A student who fails the doctoral comprehensive examina- 
tion may take it once again not sooner than the following semester 
and at a time designated by the department. In case of a second fail- 
ure, no further attempt is allowed. 

During the semester in which students take the comprehensive 
examinations, they should register for Doctoral Comprehensives 998. 
No course credit is granted for Doctoral Comprehensives registration. 

Comprehensive Examination: Master's 

Candidates for Master's degrees in Graduate School of Arts 
and Sciences, Lynch School of Education and Connell Graduate 
School of Nursing must pass a departmental comprehensive exami- 
nation that may be oral, written, or both, as determined by the 
department. Each candidate should consult his or her major depart- 
ment to learn the time and nature of the comprehensive examina- 
tion. Registration for comprehensives will take place directly with 
the individual departments. Questions on the nature and the exact 
date of examinations should be directed to the Department 
Chairperson or Graduate Program Director. 

The following grading scale is used: pass with distinction 
(PwD), pass (P), and fail (F). A candidate who fails the Master's 
Comprehensive Examination may take it only one more time. 
Students who have completed their course work should register for 
Interim Study (888) each semester until they complete their com- 
prehensive examinations. Only the registration and the activity fees 
are charged during this period. No credit is granted. 

Core Curriculum — Undergraduate University Core 
Requirements 

The following courses comprise the Core curriculum and are 
required for all students entering Boston College: 

• 1 course in Writing 

• 1 course in Literature — Classics, English, German Studies, 
Romance Languages and Literatures, Slavic and Eastern 
Languages 

• 1 course in the Arts — Fine Arts, Music, Theatre 

• 1 course in Mathematics — For Carroll School of Management 



students one semester of Calculus (MT 100 or higher) and 
one semester of Statistics (EC 151) are required. 

• 2 courses in History — Modern History I and II 

• 2 courses in Philosophy 

• 2 courses in Social Sciences — Economics (EC 131 and EC 
132 for Carroll School of Management), Political Science, 
Psychology, Psychology in Education (PY 030 and PY 031 are 
required for Lynch School of Education and acceptable in all 
schools), or Sociology 

• 2 courses in Natural Science — Biology, Chemistry, 
Geology/Geophysics, Physics 

• 2 courses in Theology 

• 1 course in Cultural Diversity (PY 03 1 for Lynch School of 
Education) 

The Connell School of Nursing curriculum satisfies the 
University's Cultural Diversity Core requirement. 

The Cultural Diversity requirement may be fulfilled by an 
appropriate course taken to fulfill another Core requirement, a 
major requirement, or an elective. 

Students are advised to select Core courses very carefully. 
Identification of Core courses can be determined by contacting the 
appropriate department head in the College of Arts & Sciences and 
by reference to each semester's Schedule of Courses. 

Cross Registration 

College of Advancing Studies 

All full-time undergraduate students are limited to one College 
of Advancing Studies course each semester. Freshmen may not enroll 
in any College of Advancing Studies course. 

College of Advancing Studies courses can be used to fulfill 
elective requirements. Students must check with the appropriate 
department if they intend to use a College of Advancing Studies 
course to fulfill a Core or major requirement. 

Boston Theological Institute 

Students who want to cross register through the Boston 
Theological Institute (BTI) should pick up a cross registration peti- 
tion in Lyons Hall and return it with an authorization by the appro- 
priate date. Students are expected to consult with their advisor or 
department chairperson before cross registering. Graduate Theology 
majors may take up to half of their courses through BTI. 

The following colleges and universities participate in the BTI 
cross registration program. 

• Andover Newton School of Theology 

• Boston University School of Theology 

• Episcopal Divinity School 

• Gordon-Conwell School of Theology 

• Harvard Divinity School 

• Holy Cross College (Greek Theology School) 

• St. John's Seminary 

• Weston School of Theology 

The Consortium 

Under a program of cross registration, sophomores, juniors 
and seniors may take one elective course during each semester at 
Boston University, Brandeis University, Hebrew College, Pine 
Manor College, Regis College or Tufts University if a similar course 
is not available at Boston College. A description of cross registration 
procedures and the authorization form are available in the Office of 
Student Services, Lyons Hall. 

Graduate students, except law students, may cross register for 
one course each semester at Boston University, Brandeis and Tufts. 
M.B.A. students are not permitted to register at Brandeis University 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



33 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



and students in the Graduate Finance program are not allowed to 
cross register at any of the universities. Cross registration materials 
are available in Lyons Hall. 

Law school students may cross register for classes only at 
Boston University Law School and only if the course they wish to 
take at BU will not be offered at any time during the current acade- 
mic year. Students wishing to cross register must see the Director of 
Academic Services for permission. 

The Graduate Consortium in Women's Studies at Radcliffe is 
an inter-institutional enterprise established to advance the field of 
women's studies and enlarge the scope of graduate education through 
new models of team teaching and interdisciplinary study. Faculty and 
students are drawn from six member schools: Boston College, 
Brandeis, Harvard, Northeastern, MIT, and Tufts. Graduate students 
enrolled in degree programs at Boston College may take GCWS sem- 
inars with department permission and should follow the cross regis- 
tration procedures described under Consortium. 

Dean's List 

The Dean's List recognizes the achievement of undergraduates 
semester by semester. The Dean's List classifies students in three 
groups according to semester averages: First Honors (3.700-4.000); 
Second Honors (3.500-3.699); Third Honors (3.300-3.499). In 
order to be eligible for the Dean's List, students must also earn 12 or 
more credits and receive a passing grade in all courses; students who 
have withdrawn or failed a course and students who have received an 
incomplete grade or a "J " grade (See Grading section listed below) 
will not be eligible for the Dean's List. 

Degree Audit 

A degree audit is a computer-generated analysis that enables an 
undergraduate (except for College of Advancing Studies) or law stu- 
dent and his/her advisor to assess the student's academic progress 
and unfulfilled requirements. The degree audit is a valuable tool for 
academic planning because it matches the courses that the student 
has taken with the requirements of his/her degree program or antic- 
ipated program. Students receive degree audits each semester prior 
to registration and have access to actual and simulated degree audits 
on AGORA. Students are responsible for completing all the require- 
ments listed on the degree audit prior to graduation. 

Degree with Honors 

Latin honors accompanying the degrees of Bachelor of Arts 
and Bachelor of Science are awarded in three grades according to the 
cumulative average. Summa cum laude, with Highest Honors, is 
awarded to the top 4.5% of the graduating class; magna cum laude, 
with High Honors, is awarded to the next 9.5%; and cum laude, 
with Honors, to the next 15%. These percentages are based on the 
student's overall cumulative average. 

Doctoral Continuation 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy for the 
Ph.D. degree are required to register and pay the fee for Doctoral 
Continuation (999) during each semester of their candidacy. 
Students in Connell School of Nursing, Lynch School of Education 
and Graduate School of Social Work register for Doctoral 
Continuation after completing requirements for two or more semes- 
ters of dissertation-related course work. 

Enrollment Status 

Undergraduate Full-Time Enrollment Status 

The usual program for freshmen, sophomores, and juniors is 
five courses worth a minimum of three credits each semester and 
four or five courses each semester for seniors. Carroll School of 
Management freshmen take Introduction to Ethics, a one-credit. 



ten-week offering, as a sixth course during one semester of freshman 
year and Lynch School of Education freshmen take a one-credit 
Professional Development Seminar during the first semester of fresh- 
man year. University policy states that undergraduate students must 
be registered for at least four three-credit courses per semester. 

Undergraduate Part-Time Enrollment Status 

Visiting or special students may enroll in one, two or three 
courses each semester through the College of Advancing Studies. 
Additional courses require the dean's approval. 

Graduate Full-Time Enrollment Status 

Graduate full-time enrollment is as follows: 
College of Advancing Studies — 12 credits 
Graduate Arts and Sciences — 9 or more credits 
Connell Graduate Nursing — 9 or more credits 
Lynch School of Education — 9 or more credits 
Carroll Graduate School of Management — 12 or more credits 
Graduate School of Social Work — 18 or more credits 
Law School — 12 or more credits 
All students are considered half-time with 6 credits. 
The credit amounts listed above are used to determine a stu- 
dent's enrollment status for loan deferments, immunizations, med- 
ical insurance requirements, and verifications requested by other 
organizations. 

Graduate students, excluding Graduate School of Social Work 
and Law School students, registered for less than a full-time course 
load may be considered full-time if they are Graduate Assistants for 
academic departments. Teaching Fellows, or Research Assistants. 
Graduate students are considered full-time if they are enrolled in a 
full-time Student Teaching Practica or Internship. Graduate students 
registered for Interim Study, Thesis Direction, Doctoral Compre- 
hensives. Qualifying Exam (School of Social Work), or Doctoral 
Continuation are considered full-time. 

Courses also flagged as full-time are BI 801, EC 900, EC 901, 
HS 997, LL 856, LL 858, NU 901, NU 902, SW 939, SW 995, SW 
996, and SW 997. 

External Courses — Undergraduate 

After admission to Boston College, the only courses that a stu- 
dent may apply towards a degree will be those offered at Boston 
College (through the Carroll School of Management, College of Arts 
and Sciences, Lynch School of Education, and Connell School of 
Nursing) in a regular course of study during the academic year. Any 
exceptions to this rule must be approved in writing by the Associate 
Dean before the courses are begun. Exceptions may be granted by the 
Associate Dean for official cross-registration programs, the 
International Study program, certain special study programs at other 
universities, courses in the College of Advancing Studies, and sum- 
mer school courses including those taken at Boston College's 
Summer Session. 

A student must earn a grade of C- or better to receive credit 
for any course taken at another university. In some instances, the 
Associate Dean may stipulate a higher grade. After the course has 
been completed, the student should request that the Registrar at the 
host university forward an official transcript to the Office of Student 
Services at Boston College. 

Final Examinations 

The final examination schedule for most courses is set before 
classes begin; it is available to the public and students are responsi- 
ble for consulting it. A student who misses a final examination is not 
entitled, as a matter of right, to a make-up examination except for 
serious illness and/or family emergency. No student should make 



34 



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The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



travel arrangements to return home which are at odds with his or her 
examination schedule. Students who schedule a departure without 
so clearing their schedules risk failure in the final examination. 

Courses with multiple sections may have common depart- 
mental final examinations at a date and time determined by the 
Office of Student Services. Students with three final examinations 
scheduled for the same day are entitled to take a makeup exam at a 
later date during exam week. If one of the three exams is a common 
departmental exam, this is the exam that is taken at the later date. 

In the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, seminars and 
teacher-training courses may or may not have a semester examina- 
tion at the discretion of the instructor. Semester examinations are 
given in all other courses. 

Foreign Language Requirement — Undergraduate 

All students in the College of Arts and Sciences and the Carroll 
School of Management must demonstrate proficiency at the inter- 
mediate level in a modern foreign language or in a classical language 
before graduation. The Lynch School of Education and the Connell 
School of Nursing do not have a language requirement. 

In the College of Arts and Sciences and the Carroll School of 
Management proficiency in French, German, or Spanish may be 
demonstrated by a score of 3 or better on the A. P. exam or a score of 
500 or better on the SAT II reading exam. A proficiency examina- 
tion in German is also available through the department. Proficiency 
in Latin or Greek may be demonstrated by a score of 4 or 5 on the 
A.P. exam or of 600 or better on the SAT II reading exam. Students 
wishing to demonstrate proficiency in a language other than those 
listed above, and those for whom English is not their first language, 
should consult their class dean. Satisfaction of the requirement 
through course work requires successful completion of the second 
semester at the intermediate level or one semester above the inter- 
mediate level. 

In the Carroll School of Management, language proficiency 
may also be demonstrated by passing four years of high school lan- 
guage study (which need not be the same language, e.g., two years of 
Latin and two years of French would fulfill the language require- 
ment) . Alternately, if a student enters Boston College with three 
years of a foreign language, he or she may fulfill the requirement by 
taking one year of a new language or by completing two semesters of 
an intermediate level language. 

Language courses will count as Arts and Sciences electives. 
Students with documented learning disabilities may be exempt from 
the foreign language requirement and should consult with the 
Associate Dean. Fulfillment of the proficiency requirement by the 
examinations listed above does not confer course credit. 
College of Advancing Studies 

College of Advancing Studies students must demonstrate pro- 
ficiency at the intermediate level in a foreign language or pursue two 
foreign literature in English translation courses. 

Foreign Language Requirement — Graduate 

In the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences each department 
shall decide the extent and nature of the language requirements for its 
students. Nursing students in the doctoral program must demonstrate 
proficiency in at least one language other than English or demonstrate 
computer literacy through completion of required courses. 

Good Standing 

Undergraduate 

To remain in good standing, a student must maintain a cumu- 
lative average of at least 1.667 (1.5 in Management and 1.5 for the 
first three years in Arts and Sciences) as the minimum standard of 



scholarship and must not fall behind the normal load of the equiva- 
lent of five courses each semester (or four in senior year) by more 
than two courses. Students in the Lynch School of Education must 
complete all methods courses, at least eight courses in their other 
major, and have at least a 2.5 GPA to be eligible for a practicum 
(full-time student teaching senior year). Students in the Connell 
School of Nursing must complete all nursing courses successfully 
and have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher in nurs- 
ing courses. 

Failure to maintain good standing either through a low cumu- 
lative average, by incurring deficiencies including failures, with- 
drawals or unapproved underloads, or by being unsafe in the nurs- 
ing clinical area will result in the student's being placed on proba- 
tion, or being required to withdraw, as the Academic Standards 
Committee or the dean shall determine. 

Unless the student returns to good standing by the approved meth- 
ods or if the student incurs additional failures or withdrawals, or carries 
an unapproved underload while on probation, then the student will be 
required to withdraw from the School at the time of the next review. 

Graduate 

In the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, a student who 
receives a grade of C in more than 1 or F in more than 8 semester 
hours of course work may be required to withdraw from school. 

In the Connell School of Nursing, students in the Ph.D. pro- 
gram must maintain an average grade of B or better. A grade of C or 
lower in any course is cause for academic review. Students in the 
Master's program who enrolled after September 1, 1998 must main- 
tain a grade point average of 3.0. If the GPA falls below 3.0, the stu- 
dent will be on academic review. Students who receive a grade of F 
in three or more credits or a grade of C in six or more credits will 
also be placed on academic review. Academic review may result in 
recommendations that course work be repeated, that the student be 
placed on academic probation, or that the student be dismissed from 
the program. Students admitted prior to September 1, 1998 should 
see the Connell School of Nursing section for requirements. 

In the Graduate School of Social Work, a student is expected 
to maintain a minimum cumulative average of 3.0 and, when applic- 
able, satisfactory performance in field education. Failure to maintain 
either of these requirements will result in the student being placed 
on probation or being required to withdraw. 

In the Lynch School Graduate Programs, a student who 
receives a grade of C in two courses (six semester hours) or a grade 
of F in an elective course (three semester hours) may be reviewed by 
the Academic Standards Committee and put on academic proba- 
tion. A subsequent grade of C or F in an elective course may be 
grounds for dismissal from the Lynch School. A grade of F in a 
required course may be grounds for review by the Academic 
Standards Committee and possible dismissal from the Lynch School. 

In the Law School, a student must maintain a cumulative aver- 
age of at least 2.0, measured at the end of each academic year, as well 
as receive a 2.0 average for each year's work to remain in good acad- 
emic standing. Students whose grade point averages fall below 2.0 
for an academic year are subject to exclusion. In addition, students 
must receive a passing grade (D or better) in all first year courses as 
a requirement for graduation. 

In the Carroll School of Management, a M.B.A. or M.S. in 
Finance student must maintain a cumulative average of 2.67 or high- 
er in their course work to be eligible to graduate. M.B.A. students 
who receive grades of C or less in five courses are subject to review by 
the Academic Review Board and may be required to withdraw from 
the program. M.B.A. students who receive three or more Fs are auto- 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



35 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



matically dropped from degree candidacy. M.S. in Finance students 
who receive grades of C or less in three courses are subject to review 
by the Academic Review Board and may be required to withdraw from 
the program. M.S. in Finance students who receive two or more Fs 
are automatically dropped from degree candidacy. Doctoral students 
should review the Ph.D. academic manual for grading procedures. 

Grading 

Undergraduate 

The grading system consists of twelve categories, as follows: A, 
A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D, D-, F A is excellent; B is good; C 
is satisfactory; D is passing, but unsatisfactory; F is failure. 

Students who withdraw from a course after the drop/add peri- 
od will receive a grade of W. The grade of W is not included in the 
calculation of the grade point average. 

Students in the Connell School of Nursing must achieve a grade 
of C- or higher in nursing courses, or they will be required to retake 
the course. 

With the approval of the Associate Dean of their school or col- 
lege, students may be permitted to take courses for enrichment. 
These courses are normally taken in the summer. Courses approved 
for enrichment only, may, with the approval of the relevant depart- 
ment, go toward fulfilling a Core, major, or minor requirement. 
However, grades for courses taken for enrichment are not computed 
into the cumulative average and are not counted toward the total 
course or credit requirement for graduation. 

A student's cumulative average is comprised of courses taken at 
Boston College or those courses specifically approved by the associ- 
ate dean. The cumulative average does not include courses accepted 
in transfer including courses accepted in transfer from the College of 
Advancing Studies. Information about a course failed remains on the 
student's record and 0.0 is still computed into the grade point aver- 
age even if the course is repeated with a passing grade; the later grade 
is also computed into the grade point average. 

Grades will be posted on AGORA at the close of each semes- 
ter. Any student who believes there is a grade discrepancy on a 
semester grade report should resolve the discrepancy within the first 
six weeks of the following semester. 

Graduate 

In each graduate course, in which a student is registered for 
graduate credit, with the exception of those noted below, the student 
will receive one of the following grades at the end of the semester: A, 
A-, B+, B, B-, C, F, W, J, or I. The high passing grade of A is award- 
ed for superior work. The passing grade of B is awarded for work that 
clearly is satisfactory at the graduate level. The low passing grade of C 
is awarded for work that is minimally acceptable at the graduate level. 
The failing grade of F is awarded for work that is unsatisfactory. 

Students in the Law School may receive grades of C+, C- and 
D. The grade of A or A- is awarded for exceptional work which 
demonstrates a superior level of academic accomplishment in the area 
of study. The grades of B+, B and B- are awarded for good work, 
which demonstrates achievement of a level of academic accomplish- 
ment above that expected of a minimally competent graduate of an 
accredited American law school. The grades of C+ and C are award- 
ed for competent work, which demonstrates achievement of a level of 
academic accomplishment expected of a minimally competent grad- 
uate of an accredited American law school. The grades of C- and D 
may be awarded for unsatisfactory work, which does not demonstrate 
achievement of the minimum level of competence expected of any 
graduate of an accredited American law school but which demon- 
strates enough potential for improvement that the student could rea- 
sonably be expected to achieve such a level by conscientious study. 



In the Graduate School of Social Work doctoral program and 
in the Graduate College of Advancing Studies, graduate credit is 
granted for courses in which the student receives a grade of A, A-, 
B+, or B. No degree credit is granted for a course in which a student 
receives a grade of B- or below. 

A pass/fail option is available for a limited number of courses, 
as stipulated by the School. 

Grading Scale 

In computing averages, the following numerical equivalents for 
the twelve (12) letter grades are used: 
A 4.00 
A- 3.67 
B+ 3.33 
B 3.00 
B- 2.67 
C+ 2.33 
C 2.00 
C- 1.67 
D+ 1.33 
D 1.00 
D-.67 
F .00 
P No effect on GPA 

Incomplete and Deferred Grades 

Undergraduate/ Graduate 

All required work in any course must be completed by the date 
set for the course examination. A student who has not completed the 
research or written work for a course taken in the fall or spring 
semester or is absent from the course examination in either semester, 
may, with adequate reason and at the discretion of the instructor, 
receive a temporary grade of Incomplete (I). All such I grades will 
automatically be changed to F on March 1 for the fall, August 1 for 
the spring, and October 1 for the summer. 

A J grade is recorded when the grade is deferred. A faculty 
member may assign a grade of J for courses that continue beyond the 
normal semester period. Such courses may include Internship, 
Dissertation Direction, and Student Teaching. 

Graduate 

The Graduate School of Social Work requires that any faculty 
member asked, and agreeing to extend an Incomplete for more than 
30 days after the original exam/paper deadline, submit a designated 
explanatory form to the Chair of the Academic Standards Review 
Committee. A Graduate School of Social Work student who fails to 
remove an I within the 30 days or to secure the extension form from 
the respective faculty member, will receive an F for the course. 

A Law School student who receives an Incomplete must 
arrange with the professor to satisfy the course requirements within 
one semester. An Incomplete becomes an F if the I is not removed 
within the stated time. 

Except in the Carroll School of Management, students with 
graduate assistantships may not carry any Incompletes. 

Pass/Fail Electives — Undergraduate 

Sophomores, juniors and seniors may enroll in a non-major or 
non-Core course on a pass/fail basis anytime during the registration peri- 
od. Pass/fail choices cannot be made subsequent to the drop/add period. 

No more than one pass/fail course may be taken in any semes- 
ter. No student may take more than 6 pass/fail courses for credit 
toward a degree. 

Any language courses taken before the language proficiency 
requirement is fulfilled may not be taken on a pass/fail basis. 



36 



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The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



No student may take Carroll School of Management or 
College of Advancing Studies courses on a pass/fail basis. No Carroll 
School of Management student may take an Arts & Sciences 
requirement (including Core or Carroll School of Management cur- 
riculum requirements) pass/fail. 

Pass/Fail Electives — Graduate 

Field Education in the Graduate School of Social Work is 
graded on a pass/fail basis. A pass/fail option is available for a limit- 
ed number of other courses when approved by the Associate Dean's 
office. A "P" has no effect on the GPA, but if the student fails the 
course, the F is calculated into the GPA. Connell Graduate School 
of Nursing students enroll in NU 901 and NU 902 on a pass/fail 
basis. Students in the Law School may not take courses pass/fail 
unless the entire course has been designated a pass/fail course. 
IREPM students should contact the Institute of Religious Education 
and Pastoral Ministry. Students in Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences, Carroll Graduate School of Management, Graduate 
College of Advancing Studies and Lynch School of Education may 
not take courses counting toward the degree pass/fail. 

Grade Change 

Grade changes should be made only for exceptional reasons. 
For all students, the grades submitted by faculty at the end of each 
semester are considered final unless the faculty member has granted 
the student an incomplete to provide time to finish his/her course 
work. Such incompletes should only be granted for serious reasons, 
e.g., illness, and only when the student has been able to complete 
most of the course work, but is missing a specific assignment, e.g., a 
final paper, an examination, etc. Incompletes are not to be granted 
to allow the student to complete a major portion of the course work 
after the end of the semester. 

Graduation 

The University awards degrees in May, August, and December of 
each year, although commencement ceremonies are held only in May. 
Students who have completed all requirements for the degree before a 
specific graduation date are eligible to receive the degree as of that 
date. A diploma will not be dated before all work is completed. 

In order to ensure timely clearance, all students who plan to 
graduate should sign up on-line at http://agora.bc.edu by the fol- 
lowing dates: 

• February 1 5 for May 

• August 1 5 for August 

• November 1 5 for December 

Internal Transfers 

Matriculated students wishing to transfer from one under- 
graduate college to another within Boston College should contact 
the Associate Dean's office of the school to which admission is 
sought. Students may apply at the end of their freshman year. 

Students applying for internal transfer will ordinarily be 
expected to have a cumulative average of at least 3.0 with no defi- 
ciencies. All students must complete at least 3 (4 in Lynch School of 
Education and Connell School of Nursing) semesters of full-time 
study afl:er the transfer. Previous enrollment will not satisfy this 
requirement. 

Applications are normally submitted to the Associate Dean 
before November 30 for spring semester admission and before April 
1 5 for fall semester admission. 

Leave of Absence — Undergraduate 

A student in good standing who desires to interrupt the usual 
progress of an academic program may petition for a leave of absence. 
The process begins in the Associate Dean's Office and will be extend- 



ed for no more than one year, although petition for renewal is pos- 
sible. Students on leave of absence may not take courses to advance 
their status at Boston College without obtaining prior approval from 
the Associate Dean. 

To assure re-enrollment for a particular semester following a 
leave of absence, students must notify their Associate Dean's Office 
at least six weeks in advance of the start of the registration period. 

Returning students may elect to apply for admission to the 
College of Advancing Studies. 

Leave of Absence — Graduate 

Master's students who do not register for course work. Thesis 
Direction, or Interim Study in any given semester must request a 
leave of absence for that semester. Leaves of absence are not usually 
granted for more than two semesters at a time. Students may obtain 
the Leave of Absence Form on-line at http://www.bc.edu/stu- 
dentservices and submit it for the Associate Dean's approval. 

Leave time will normally be considered a portion of the total 
time limit for the degree unless the contrary is decided upon initial- 
ly between the student and the Associate Dean. In the Law School 
and the Graduate School of Social Work, a student must graduate 
within four years of matriculation unless this time is extended for 
good cause by the school's Academic Standards Committee. 

Students must file the re-admission form with the Associate 
Dean's Office at least six weeks prior to the semester in which they 
expect to reenroU. The appropriate Associate Dean's Office will make 
the decision on the readmission application. The decision will be 
based on a consideration of the best interests of both the student and 
the University. 

Students requesting readmission to the Graduate School of Social 
Work must contact the Director of Social Work Admissions at least one 
semester before their intended return to insure appropriate class and 
field placement. The readmission decision will include a review of the 
student's prior academic and field performance, the length of his/her 
absence, current admission policies, enrollment and changes in the pro- 
gram or degree requirements that may have taken place during the peri- 
od of absence. The decision will be based on a consideration of the best 
interests of both the student and the University. 

The conditions for leaves of absence and re-admission as noted 
for the Master's Program are also applicable to the Doctoral 
Program. Leaves of absence for students on Doctoral Continuation 
are rarely granted. 

Majors, Minors, and Concentrations 

Majors 

A major is a systematic concentration of at least ten courses 
taken in a given academic discipline that enables a student to acquire 
a more specialized knowledge of the discipline, its history, its 
methodologies and research tools, its subfields and the areas of con- 
cern in which the discipline is presently involved. This is done by 
means of a hierarchical sequence of courses or appropriate distribu- 
tion requirements. 

At Boston College, undergraduate majors are available in the 
following fields: American Heritages (Lynch School of Education), 
American Studies (College of Advancing Studies), Art History, 
Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Child in Society (Lynch School of 
Education), Classics, Communication, Computer Science, 
Corporate Systems, Criminal and Social Justice (College of 
Advancing Studies), Early Childhood Education (Lynch School of 
Education), Elementary Education (Lynch School of Education), 
Economics, English, Environmental Geosciences, Film Studies, 
French, Hispanic Studies, Perspectives on Spanish America (Lynch 
School of Education), Human Development (Lynch School of 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



37 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



Education), Information Technology (College of Advancing Studies), 
Geology, Geophysics, German Studies, History, Interna-tional 
Studies, Italian, Latin, Linguistics, Mathematics, Math/ Computer 
Science (Lynch School of Education), Music, Nursing (Connell 
School of Nursing), Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, 
Psychology, Romance Languages and Literatures, Russian, Secondary 
Education (Lynch School of Education), Slavic Studies, Social 
Sciences, Sociology, Studio Art, Theatre, and Theology. 

An Independent or Interdisciplinary Major, involving courses 
from several departments, is also available under certain conditions 
for students whose needs cannot be satisfied by the offerings of a sin- 
gle department. A student may choose more than one major but in 
each must fulfill the minimum requirements set by the Department 
and the College. 

Minors 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Some departments offer a minor for students who wish to 
complement their major with intensive study in another area. A 
departmental minor consists of six or seven courses. These must 
include one introductory level course and at least one upper-level 
course or seminar. 

Departmental minors are available in the departments of 
Chemistry, Computer Science, Economics, Fine Arts, Geology and 
Geophysics, German, History, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, 
Physics, Romance Languages and Literatures, Russian and Theology. 

Interdisciplinary minors in the College of Arts and Sciences 
must consist of six courses and must include either a required intro- 
ductory course or a concluding seminar or project. (Note: some pro- 
grams require both.) The list and description of the interdisciplinary 
minors is available in the College of Arts and Sciences section of this 
catalog. Students choose courses for the minor in consultation with 
the director of the department's minor program. 

Students carrying a double major are advised not to minor. 
Lynch School of Education 

Lynch School majors and students in the College of Arts and 
Sciences may minor in Special Education or Health Science. Some 
Lynch School Elementary and Secondary Education majors are eli- 
gible to minor in Middle School Mathematics Teaching. 

Further information on these four minors is available in the 
Lynch School of Education section of the University catalog. 
Carroll School of Management 

Students in the Carroll School of Management may select any 
minor offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. The minor in 
Organizational Studies-Human Development, offered in conjunc- 
tion with the Lynch School of Education, is available to Carroll 
School of Management students who have interests in developmen- 
tal or educational psychology or in the social service professions. 

Carroll School of Management students only may pursue an 
International Studies for Management Minor Students choose a coun- 
try, or an area (e.g., the European Community), study or intern for at 
least one semester (or equivalent) at a university in that country, and 
take five (5) international courses. Full details are available from the 
Associate Dean's office. 

Concentrations 

Undergraduate Carroll School of Management (CSOM) 

Concentrations, or areas of specialization, are required for stu- 
dents earning degrees from Carroll School of Management and are 
available to Carroll School of Management students only. Most con- 
centrations require four courses beyond the Core. However, some 
require five. Students must complete a concentration in one of the 



following areas: Accounting, Accounting and Information 
Technology, Computer Science, Economics, Finance, General 
Management, Human Resources Management, Information 
Systems, Marketing, or Operations and Technology Management. 
Students declare a concentration second semester sophomore year or 
during the junior year. 

Graduate 

Concentrations are offered in selected graduate programs. See 
the individual school sections for further information. 

Overloads 

Students who have earned in a full course load at least a 3.0 
overall average or a 3.0 average in the semester immediately prior to 
the one for which the overload is sought may register for a sixth 
course. Students should register on-line for the sixth course during 
the first week of class and must notify the Associate Dean by the 
sixth week of classes whether they wish to drop the course. 

Students whose averages are between 2.0 and 3.0 may, under 
exceptional circumstances, be allowed by an Associate Dean to enroll 
in a sixth course. Students are not permitted to take a sixth course in 
their first semester at Boston College. 

Overload courses taken for acceleration will carry an extra 
tuition charge. This includes fifth courses taken during senior year. 

Students in a College of Advancing Studies degree program 
take a maximum course load of three courses per semester. One 
course may also be taken during May-June and one during Summer 
Session. Authorization for one additional course will be given only if 
a student has completed three courses in the previous semester, each 
with a grade of B- or above. Courses taken without reference to this 
regulation do not advance a student's degree program. 

Readmission 

Students who desire readmission should initiate the process in 
the Office of the Associate Dean of their school or college. 
Applications for readmission should be made at least six weeks 
before the start of the semester in which the former student seeks to 
resume study. 

The appropriate Associate Dean's office will make the decision 
on the readmission application. The decision will be based on a con- 
sideration of the best interests of both the student and the 
University. 

Students requesting readmission to the Graduate School of 
Social Work must contact the Director of Social Work Admissions at 
least one semester before their intended return to insure appropriate 
class and field placement. The readmission decision will include a 
review of the student's prior academic and field performance, the 
length of his/her absence, current admission policies, enrollment 
and changes in the program or degree requirements that may have 
taken place during the period of absence. 

Study Abroad — Center for International Programs 
and Partnerships (CIPP) 

Boston College international programs are open to Boston 
College undergraduate and graduate students who meet all the 
requirements for study abroad as outlined by their associate dean. In 
order to be eligible for admission, students must be in good academ- 
ic standing with a GPA of 3.2 or higher and have a clear disciplinary 
record. Final approval is at the discretion of the CIPP, deans, and the 
Office of the Dean for Student Development. Many programs have 
additional requirements and applicants are selected competitively to 
most. Students should consult the CIPP program pages of the cata- 
log for specific admission information. 



38 



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The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



Students remain subject to the academic policies of their home 
department. They must register for a complete course load as 
defined by the host university in order to earn full Boston College 
credit. Grades earned abroad on Boston College programs are con- 
verted into the BC grading scale and are figured into GPA calcula- 
tions. Grades earned on non-BC programs are not. 

Students wishing to take Core courses abroad should consult 
Core guidelines. In general, Cultural Diversity credit is reserved for 
courses taken at BC and approved by the Core Committee. 
However, credit may be given for a course (taken in a non-western 
country) whose principal focus is upon that country's culture, or for 
a course (taken in a western country) whose principal focus is upon 
the situation within that country of indigenous minorities or immi- 
grant minorities from non-western countries. The student request- 
ing such credit must submit an extensive course description or 
course syllabus for approval by the Director of the Core Committee 
and turn in a completed course approval form to the CIPP. 

Summer Courses — Undergraduate 

Summer courses are considered external courses. Students may 
be permitted to take summer courses for enrichment or to make up 
for a past failure, withdrawal, or underload or to accommodate 
extraordinary circumstances (e.g., the loss of a semester due to ill- 
ness). Summer school courses including BC Summer School and 
International Study courses must have prior approval from the 
appropriate department chairperson and from the associate dean. 

Summer Courses — Graduate 

In graduate programs, summer courses may be an integral part 
of the curriculum. Please consult the specific school section for fur- 
ther information. 

Transcripts 

All current students submit requests for academic transcripts at 
http://agora.bc.edu. Requests for academic and financial aid tran- 
scripts may also be submitted in writing to the following address: 
Transcript Requests, Office of Student Services, Lyons Hall, Boston 
College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, or faxed to 617-552-4975. 

Requests are usually processed within 48-72 hours of receipt. 
Transcript/Diploma Holds 

Diplomas will not be issued, nor transcript requests honored, 
for any student with an outstanding financial obligation to the 
University. The same policy applies to any student who does not 
complete the required loan exit interview. 

Transfer of Credit — Undergraduate 

The unit of credit at Boston College is the semester hour. Most 
courses earn three semester hours of credit; lab sciences usually earn 
four semester hours of credit. In order to be eligible for Boston College 
transfer credit, courses must have earned at least three semester hours 
or an equivalent number of credits (e.g., four quarter hours). 

Courses not presented for review and evaluation at the time of 
application will not be accepted for credit at a later date. 

No transfer credit will be granted for internships, field experi- 
ences, practica, or independent study. 

Grade point averages do not transfer with students. A new 
grade point average begins with the commencement of a student's 
career at the University, and reflects only work completed as a full 
time undergraduate at Boston College. A new grade point average 
also begins when students transfer from the College of Advancing 
Studies to one of the full-time undergraduate schools. 

Courses taken at other institutions during the summer prior to 
enrollment at Boston College must be approved in advance by the 
Office of Transfer Admission to avoid difficulty in the transfer of cred- 



its. Courses taken through the Boston College Summer Session dur- 
ing the summer prior to enrollment must be approved by the appro- 
priate Associate Dean. After enrollment at Boston College, all summer 
courses must be approved in advance by the Associate Deans. 

Transfer of Credit — Graduate 

All graduate students, with the exceptions noted below, may 
request transfer of not more than six graduate credits upon comple- 
tion of one full semester of graduate work at Boston College. 
Transfer credit is approved by the Associate Dean. Only courses in 
which a student has received a grade of B or better, and which have 
not been applied to a prior degree, will be accepted. If approved, the 
transfer course and credit, but not the grade, will be recorded on the 
student's academic record. Credit received for courses completed 
more than ten years prior to a student's admission to his or her cur- 
rent degree program are not acceptable for transfer. 

In the Law School, no credits may be granted for any graduate 
work done at another institution if those credits were earned prior to 
a student's matriculation into a full- or part-time law school program. 

Prior to admission, students in the Graduate School of Social 
Work M.S.W. program may apply for transfer credit equal to a max- 
imum of one half of the total credits needed for graduation. Course 
and/or field work submitted for transfer credit must have been taken 
within the previous four years in an M.S.W. program accredited by 
the Council of Social Work Education, and carry a grade of B or bet- 
ter. Students enrolled in the M.S.W. program may receive credit for 
courses taken at universities outside the consortium during enroll- 
ment under the following conditions: (1) approval of the student's 
advisor, (2) recommendation of the Academic Standards Review 
Committee, and (3) permission of the instructor or administrative 
unit at the host university. 

Doctoral students in the Graduate School of Social Work may 
request transfer of not more than six graduate credits (or two gradu- 
ate courses) taken prior to admission. Only doctoral level courses in 
which the student received a grade of B or better will be considered 
for transfer. 

Transfer of Credit Forms should be submitted, together with 
an official transcript, directly to the student's chairperson and for- 
warded to the associate dean for approval. If approved, the transfer 
course and credit, but not a grade, will be recorded on the student's 
academic record. 

M.B.A. students in the Carroll School of Management who 
have completed graduate management course work at another 
AACSB accredited institution may receive advanced standing credit 
for a maximum of 12 semester credit hours. Students who have 
completed course work at non-AACAB accredited programs will not 
be granted advanced standing but may be allowed to substitute an 
elective for a core course. Students may also receive up to 12 credits 
of advanced standing credit for master's or doctoral degrees in any of 
the fields in which the Carroll School of Management offers a dual 
degree, concentration or certificate program. All students interested 
in advanced standing or equivalency must complete the official form 
available in the Associate Dean's office. M.S. in Finance students will 
not receive advanced standing credit but may be allowed to substi- 
tute an elective for a core class. 

University Degree Requirements — Undergraduate 

The requirement for the Bachelor's degree in the undergradu- 
ate day colleges is the completion with satisfactory cumulative aver- 
age (at least 1 . 5 in Carroll School of Management, all others require 
a minimum average of 1.667) of at least 38 three-credit courses, or 
their equivalent, distributed over eight semesters of full-time acade- 
mic work. 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



39 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



Students in the College of Arts and Sciences must complete 
the Core curriculum, a major of at least 10 courses and the language 
proficiency requirement. Thirty-two of the required 38 courses must 
be in departments of the College of Arts and Sciences. Additional 
courses may be chosen from the offerings at the Boston College pro- 
fessional schools. 

The Office of Student Services sends every undergraduate 
degree candidate, except for College of Advancing Studies students, 
a degree audit each semester. Core and major requirements stated in 
the catalog may, in exceptional circumstances, be waived or substi- 
tuted by the student's associate dean or major department. Such 
exceptions must be communicated in writing to the Office of 
Student Services. 

Withdrawal from a Course 

Students who withdraw from a course after the first five class 
days of the semester will have a " W" recorded in the grade column 
of their academic record. To withdraw from a course after the regis- 
tration period, students should go to the forms page of the Student 
Services website (http://www.bc.edu/studentservices), print the 
withdrawal form, and then go to the Office of the Associate Dean 
for their school. Students will not be permitted to withdraw from 
courses afl:er the published deadline. Students who are still registered 
at this point will receive a final grade for the semester. 

Withdrawal from Boston College 

Students who wish to withdraw from Boston College in good 
standing are required to file a Withdrawal Form in the Associate Dean's 
office. In the case of students who are dismissed for academic or disci- 
plinary reasons, the Associate Dean will process the withdrawal. 

In the Graduate School of Social Work, the student's faculty 
advisor will write a summary evaluation of the student indicating 
both an evaluation of the student's performance and reason for with- 
drawal or dismissal. 

University (Senior) Awards and Honors 

College of Arts and Sciences 

Scholar of the College: For unusual scholarly and/or creative tal- 
ent as demonstrated in course work and the Scholar's Project. 
Candidates for Scholar of the College are nominated by the depart- 
ment Chairperson and selected by the Dean in their junior year. 

Order of the Cross and Crown: For men and women who, while 
achieving an average of at least 3.5, have established records of 
unusual service and leadership on the campus. 

Bapst Philosophy Medal: For overall outstanding performance in 
philosophy courses. 

/. Robert Barth, S.J., Award: For a graduating senior who has 
made outstanding contributions to Boston College in one of the fine 
or performing arts. 

Andersen Consulting Award: Given to the senior in the College 
of Arts and Sciences who has demonstrated outstanding achieve- 
ment in computer sciences. 

Andres Bello Award: For excellence in Spanish. 

George E Bemis Award: For distinguished service to others. 

Albert A. Bennett Award: For a high level of mathematical 
achievement and interest in and desire for a career in teaching. 

Wendy Berson Award: For excellence in Romance Languages. 

Alice Bourneuf Award: For excellence in Economics. 

Francis A. Brick Award: For outstanding character, loyalty, lead- 
ership, and scholarship during four years at Boston College. 

Brendan Connolly, S.J. Award: For outstanding love of books 
and learning. 



Matthew Copithorne Scholarship: For a graduating senior who 
exhibits exemplary qualities of character, industry and intelligence 
and plans to do graduate study at Harvard or M.I.T 

Donalds. Carlisle Award: Given each year to a graduating senior 
for achievement in Political Science. 

Cardinal Cushing Award: For the best creative literary compo- 
sition published in a Boston College undergraduate periodical. 

The John Donovan Award: For the best paper for a sociology 
course. 

Joseph G. and Margaret M. Dever Fellowship: A cash grant to a 
graduating senior who shows promise of a career in writing. 

Patrick Durcan Award: For overall outstanding performance in 
history courses. 

Maeve O'Reilly Finley Fellowship: For a graduating senior or 
Boston College graduate student who has demonstrated outstanding 
achievement in Irish Studies and who will enter an Irish university 
graduate program. 

Mary A. and Katherine G. Finneran Commencement Award: For 
outstanding success in studies while also devoting time and talents 
to other activities for the enrichment of the college and student life. 

Thomas I. Gasson, S.J. Award: For a distinguished academic 
record over four years. 

General Excellence Medal: For general excellence in all branches 
of studies during the entire four years at Boston College. 

Princess Grace of Monaco Award: For excellence in French. 

Janet Wilson James Essay Prize: For an outstanding Senior Essay 
in the area of Women's Studies. 

William A. Kean Memorial Award: To the outstanding English 
major. 

Bishop Kelleher Award: For the best writing in poetry published 
in a Boston College undergraduate publication. 

William J. Kenealy, S.J. Award: For distinction in both academ- 
ic work and social concern. 

Joseph M. Larkin, S.J. Award: For the senior member of the 
Boston College Dramatics Society who has most clearly exhibited 
the qualities of dedication and integrity exemplified by the life and 
career of Joseph M. Larkin, S.J. 

Allison R. Macomber, Jr. Award in the Fine Arts: For outstand- 
ing work in the Fine Arts. 

/. Paul Marcoux Award: An award presented annually to a 
senior Theater major for excellence and growth, both academically 
and artistically over four years at Boston College. 

Richard and Marianne Martin Award: For excellence in Art 
History and Studio Art. 

Denis McCarthy Award: For outstanding work in creative writ- 
ing. 

John W McCarthy, S.J. Award: For the outstanding project in 
the sciences, humanities and social sciences. 

Albert McGuinn, S.J. Award: For excellence in a science or 
mathematics major combined with achievement — either academic, 
extracurricular, or a combination of both — in the social sciences or 
humanities. 

Henry J. McMahon Award: For a graduating senior who has 
been accepted at a law school and has been distinguished by schol- 
arship, loyalty, and service to the College. 

John F Norton Award: For the student who best personifies the 
tradition of humanistic scholarship. 

Cardinal O'Connell Theology Medal: For overall outstanding 
performance in theology courses. 

John H. Randall III Award: For the best essay on American lit- 
erature or culture during the previous year 



40 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



Mary Werner Roberts Award: For the best art work published in 
the Stylus this year. 

Secondary Education Award: For a student in the College of Arts 
and Sciences who has completed the Secondary Education Program 
within the Lynch School of Education and has achieved distin- 
guished success as a student teacher. 

Harry W. Smith Award: For use of personal talents to an excep- 
tional degree in the service of others. 

Joseph Stanton Award: For a student who has been accepted to 
a medical school and who has been outstanding in character, loyal- 
ty, leadership, and scholarship at Boston College. 

Dr. Joseph R. Stanton Scholarship: For a graduating senior who 
has been accepted to a medical school and who has been outstand- 
ing in character, loyalty, leadership, and scholarship at Boston 
College. 

Tully Theology Award: For the best paper on a theological sub- 
ject. 

Max Wainer Award: For the senior who is deemed the out- 
standing student in classics. 

Nominations for these awards may be submitted to the Office 
of the Dean. 

Carolyn A. and Peter S. Lynch School of Education 

Rev. Charles E Donovan, S.J., Award: Presented to a member of 
the senior class in honor of Fr. Donovan, founding Dean of the 
School. The recipient exhibits superior leadership, academic, and 
innovative qualities, and demonstrates excellence in professional and 
personal commitment, with a genuine concern for the needs and val- 
ues of others. 

General Excellence Award: Presented to a senior who has at the 
same time manifested outstanding achievement in all courses of 
study during four academic years and qualifies for teaching licen- 
sure. 

Saint Edmund Campion Award: Presented for excellence in an 
academic major. 

St. Richard Gwyn Award: Presented to a member of the senior 
class for outstanding promise as a secondary teacher. 

Gretchen A. Bussard Award: Presented to a member of the senior 
class in the Human Development Program who has used what he or 
she has learned in the classroom to improve the lives of others. 

Patricia M. Coyle Award: Given to the graduating senior in 
Early Childhood Education who is a clear thinker in the field, able 
to translate the theories of child development and learning into the 
practice of teaching young children with enthusiasm and love, and a 
person who is a thoughtful, reflective teacher, perceptive and sensi- 
tive to the needs of children. 

Council for Exceptional Children Award: Presented to a member 
of the Boston College Chapter of the Council for Exceptional 
Children for demonstration of unusual service to the care and edu- 
cation of children with disabilities. 

Dr. Marie M. Gearan Award: Presented in honor of Professor 
Gearan, a member of the original faculty and first Director of 
Student Teaching, to a member of the senior class for outstanding 
academic achievement, campus leadership, and distinguished success 
as a student teacher. 

Mary T. Kinnane Award for Excellence in Higher Education: 
Given annually to master's or doctoral degree students in Higher 
Education. The award, named for Emeritus Professor Kinnane, is 
given for both academic excellence and the embodiment of the Jesuit 
ideal of service to others. 

Rev. James F. Moynihan, S.J., Award: Presented in honor of Fr. 
Moynihan, first chairperson of the Psychology Department and 



Professor of Psychology in Education for many years, to a student in 
the Human Development Program, who has shown superior schol- 
arship, contributed creatively to the well-being of others, and has 
manifested dedication and commitment to the enhancement of the 
human development process. 

Karen E. Noonan Award: Given to the graduating senior in 
Early Childhood Education who has the qualities of a "natural" 
teacher of young children; a person who can communicate warmth 
and a sense of excitement for learning; a person who loves the exhil- 
aration of working with challenging students, and making each child 
in the classroom feel important and unique. 

Mr. and Mrs. Vincent P. Roberts Award: Presented to a member 
of the senior class who is distinguished for loyalty to the ideals and 
purposes of the Lynch School. 

John A. Schmitt Award: Presented to a member of the senior 
class who, as Prof Schmitt did, has consistently demonstrated com- 
passion for fellow human beings, integrity in dealings with others, 
diligence in his or her profession, and courage in the pursuit of what 
he or she believes to be right. 

Bernard A. StotskylThomas H. Browne Prize: Awarded to a stu- 
dent who has demonstrated excellence in the area of special educa- 
tion at the graduate level. 

Bernard A. StotskylProf John Eichorn Prize: Awarded to a stu- 
dent who has demonstrated excellence in the area of special educa- 
tion at the undergraduate level and does a practicum or pre- 
practicum at the Campus School as part of an academic program of 
study in the Lynch School. 

Rev. John Christopher Sullivan, S.J. Award: Presented in honor 
of Fr. Sullivan, first Associate Dean in the School, to a member of 
the senior class who, as Fr. Sullivan did, exhibits cheerfulness, cre- 
ativity, enthusiasm, and high energy. 

Rev. Henry P. Wennerberg, S.J. Award: Presented in honor of Fr. 
Wennerberg, first spiritual counselor in the School, to a member of 
the senior class who is outstanding for participation and leadership 
in school and campus activities. 

John J. Cardinal Wright Award: Presented in honor of Cardinal 
Wright to that senior who has shown expert use of creativity and 
imagination in the area of motivation, and at the same time is dedi- 
cated to high educational ideals. 

Secondary Education Award: Given to the student in the 
College of Arts and Sciences who has completed the Secondary 
Education Program and has achieved distinguished success as a stu- 
dent teacher. 

Lynch School Awards: Presented to graduating seniors for acad- 
emic excellence and outstanding performance in a variety of areas. 

Carroll School of Management 

Thomas I. Gasson, S.J. Award: Founded by Boston College for 
general excellence in all courses of study during the four years in the 
Carroll School of Management. 

The Andersen Consulting Award: Awarded to the student who, 
by the vote of the Department Faculty, has demonstrated outstand- 
ing achievement in the major field of Computer Science. 

The John B. Atkinson Award: Founded by John B. Atkinson for 
excellence in all courses studied in the major field of Operations and 
Strategic Management. 

Finance Department Outstanding Student Award: Awarded 
annually, by decision of a faculty committee of the Finance 
Department, to an outstanding senior majoring in Finance. 

The Edgar F Huse Memorial Award: An award presented annu- 
ally by the faculty for excellence in Organizational Studies and 
Human Resource Management. 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



41 



The University: Poiicies and Procedures 



The Hutchinson Memorial Award: Presented by the Boston 
chapter of the American Marketing Association to a Marketing stu- 
dent. 

The Reverend Charles W Lyons, S.J. Award: Founded by Boston 
College for general excellence in all courses studied in the major field 
of Accounting. 

The Patrick A. O'Connell Finance Award: Founded by Patrick A. 
O'Connell for excellence in all courses studied in the major field of 
Finance. 

The Patrick A. O'Connell Marketing Award: Founded by Patrick 
A. O'Connell for excellence in all courses studied in the major field 
of Marketing. 

The Eric Allen Serra Award: Established in 1993 by the friends 
of Eric Allen Serra and awarded to a graduating senior who is active- 
ly involved in the BC community and best represents the attributes 
for which Eric is remembered by his friends. 

The James E. Shaw Memorial Award: An award given to seniors 
in the Carroll School of Management who have been accepted to a 
recognized law school. 

The Reverend Stephen Shea, S.J. Award: Awarded to the senior 
who has attained the highest average in all courses in Philosophy 
during four years in the Carroll School of Management. 

The James D. Sullivan, S.J. Award: Awarded to a senior judged 
outstanding in character and achievement by a faculty committee. 

The Matthew J. Toomey Award: Presented annually by Mr. 
Knowles L. Toomey to honor the outstanding student in the Carroll 
School of Management Honors Program. 

The Wall Street Journal Award: An award given to the senior 
who, in the opinion of the faculty committee, has demonstrated out- 
standing achievement in his or her major field of study. 

William F. Connell School of Nursing 

The Alumni Award: Established by the School of Nursing 
alumni to honor a nursing student for general excellence in the four 
years of study in the baccalaureate nursing program. 

The Marie S. Andrews Clinical Performance Award: Established 
by the faculty of the Connell School of Nursing to honor the student 
who has demonstrated, through clinical performance, sensitivity to 
the needs of patients, respect for the dignity and "wholeness" of the 
patient, and outstanding ability to deliver quality nursing care. 

The Reverend Edward J . Gorman, S.J., Leadership Award: Given 
to the student who, in the judgment of classmates, best exemplifies 
leadership and who has contributed to the Connell School of 
Nursing through dedication, service, and sincerity. 

The Cathy Jean Malek Award: Established by the faculty of the 
Connell School of Nursing to honor the student whose presence 
conveys the essence of caring and a loving spirit. 

Certificates of Recognition for Leadership: Established by the fac- 
ulty of the Connell School of Nursing to recognize seniors who have 
demonstrated leadership by holding elected office or sustained lead- 
ership in a voluntary organization. 

Certificates of Recognition for Volunteer Service: Established by 
the faculty of the Connell School of Nursing to recognize seniors 
who have demonstrated a substantial commitment to others in vol- 
untary service over time. 

William F. Connell Graduate School of Nursing 

The Patricia Lhert Award: Established by the Graduate Nurses' 
Association in memory of master's degree student Patricia Ibert, who 
passed away in 1991 afi:er a battle with cancer. It is awarded annual- 
ly to a master's or doctoral student. The criteria for nomination 
include: active in coordination of CSON and University activities; 
promotes the image of professional nursing; dedicated to CSON 



goals; demonstrates leadership and responsibility for their actions; 
and insightful, friendly, dependable and caring person with high per- 
sonal aspirations who is professionally committed. 

The Dorothy A. Jones Becoming Award: Established in 1998 to 
recognize the tenth anniversary of the Graduate Nurses' Association. 
This award is given to honor a graduate student who represents the 
attributes used to describe the efforts of Dr. Dorothy Jones, a key 
founder of this Association. The criteria for nomination include: 
demonstrates visionary thinking; expands the discipline by stimulat- 
ing opportunities for nursing knowledge development; actively 
encourages and mentors peer development; is committed to Jesuit 
mission and service to others; and is committed to articulating the 
values and beliefs of professional nursing. 

Graduate Nurses' Association 'Volunteer Service and Community 
Service Recognition Awards: Established to recognize graduate stu- 
dents who have demonstrated a substantial commitment to others in 
voluntary service over time. 



42 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



Arts and Sciences 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Undergraduate College of Arts & 
Sciences 

The College of Arts and Sciences is the undergraduate liberal 
arts college of the University. Its graduates earn the academic degree 
of either Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or Bachelor of Science (B.S.), 
depending upon the major field. A student's program consists of Core 
curriculum courses, a major and elective courses. Students must also 
demonstrate proficiency at the intermediate level in a modern or clas- 
sical foreign language. A degree from the College of Arts and Sciences 
provides preparation for graduate study in the major field or a relat- 
ed field. It also furnishes sufficient breadth of information and expo- 
sure to methods of inquiry so that, either alone or with additional 
training provided by the professional schools or employers, the stu- 
dent can effectively enter any one of a wide variety of careers. 

Because of the diversity offered by the College of Arts and 
Sciences, it is important that each student exercise care, both in the 
selection of a major and of courses within the major, as well as in the 
Core curriculum and the electives program. Students with even a 
tentative interest in major fields which are structured and involve 
sequences of courses (e.g., languages, sciences, mathematics or art), 
should begin selection of their major and related courses at an early 
date. Students considering a career in medicine or dentistry should 
begin in the freshman year to fulfill the requirements for admission 
to professional schools in these areas. 

To ensure a coherent, well-developed program, students must 
meet with their faculty advisor before registration for each semester. 
They should also consult with other faculty members, the Deans, 
the Premedical and Prelaw advisors, the Counseling Office, and the 
Career Center. 

Note: Information for First Year Students has been included in 
the sections pertaining to the Core curriculum and in departments 
and programs. First Year Students should register initially for a 
Writing or Literature course, introductory major courses and/or 
courses that introduce them to potential major fields, and courses 
that fulfill other Core or language requirements. 

The Core Curriculum 

Core courses reflect the Jesuit tradition of an integrated curricu- 
lum. Through them a student learns how the various disciplines exam- 
ine perennial human and world issues and becomes acquainted with 
their methodology and history. The student can then relate this learn- 
ing to the moral significance and practical direction of his or her life. 

Majors and Minors in Arts and Sciences 

Majors 

A major is a systematic concentration of courses taken in a 
given academic discipline that enables a student to acquire a more 
specialized knowledge of the discipline, its history, its methodologies 
and research tools, its subfields and the areas of concern in which the 
discipline is presently involved. This is done by means of a hierarchi- 
cal sequence of courses or appropriate distribution requirements. In 
Arts and Sciences, majors are available in the following fields: Art 
History, Biochemistry, Biology, Chemistry, Classics, Communica- 
tion, Computer Science, Economics, English, Environmental 
Geosciences, Film Studies, French, Geology, Geophysics, German 
Studies, History, Hispanic Studies, International Studies, Italian, 
Latin, Linguistics, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political 
Science, Psychology, Romance Languages and Literatures, Russian, 
Slavic Studies, Sociology, Studio Art, Theatre, and Theology. 



Each major within the College of Arts and Sciences requires at 
least 10 courses. No more than 12 courses for the major may be 
required from any one department. Two of these may be taken at the 
introductory level, at the discretion of the department. For the 
remainder of the courses, each department may designate specific 
courses or distribution requirements either within or outside the 
department to assure the desired coherence and structure of the 
major program. It is possible for a student to major in two fields, but 
all requirements must be satisfied for each major, and no course may 
count toward more than one major. Students carrying a double 
major are advised not to minor. 

For a complete listing of all the majors and concentrations 
offered by the University see the Academic Regulations section of 
this catalog. 

Departmental Minors 

Some departments offer a minor, consisting of six or seven 
courses, for students who wish to complement their major with 
intensive study in another disciplinary area. The minor requires one 
introductory level course and at least one upper-level course or sem- 
inar. Students choose courses for the minor in consultation with the 
director of the department's minor program. The following restric- 
tions apply: 

• No more than two Core courses may be used toward a minor. 

• Core courses that do not count toward a departmental major 
will not count toward a departmental minor. 

• Students may not major and minor in the same department 
unless that department offers more than one major. 

Departmental minors are available in Art History, Chemistry, 
Computer Science, Economics, French, Geology and Geophysics, 
German, Hispanic Studies, History, Italian, Mathematics, Music, 
Philosophy, Physics, Russian, Studio Art, and Theology. Information 
regarding specific requirements is available in the departments. 

Interdisciplinary Minors 

Students who wish to complement the depth of their major 
with the breadth of interdisciplinary study may choose one of sev- 
enteen interdisciplinary minors offered by the College of Arts and 
Sciences. An interdisciplinary minor consists of six courses and must 
include either a required introductory course or a concluding semi- 
nar or project. (Note: some programs require both.) The minor aims 
for a coherent shape appropriate to the subject matter, and offers 
courses that give students a definite sense of movement — from a 
beginning to a middle and an end, from introductory to advanced 
levels, or from general treatments to specialized. Students must select 
at least three of the courses from three different Arts & Sciences 
departments. With the approval of the program, students may use 
one core course or one course from their major toward the minor. 
For specific program requirements see the individual program 
descriptions below. 

Each interdisciplinary minor is administered by a coordinat- 
ing committee, consisting of a Director appointed by the Dean, and 
at least two additional members who represent departments includ- 
ed in the minor. One important function of this committee is the 
advising of students enrolled in the program. Interdisiplinary minors 
are open to all undergraduate students. Further information can be 
found in the individual program descriptions. 
American Studies 

American Studies is an interdisciplinary program run by fac- 
ulty from several departments to expose students to a wide range of 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



43 



Arts and Sciences 



approaches to American culture. The general focus of this interdisci- 
plinary minor is on American culture past and present, specifically 
analyzing how American culture has been shaped by the interaction 
of race, class, ethnicity, gender and other issues. Courses used for ful- 
filling the minor must come from outside the student's major and 
from at least two different departments. Six courses are required for 
the minor. Three of five courses must be clustered around a common 
theme. Thematic clusters in the past have included: race in American 
culture, gender in American culture, ethnicity in American culture, 
media and race, media and gender, colonialism and American cul- 
ture, poverty and gender, diversity in urban culture, and other top- 
ics. In the fall of the senior year, each student must (as his or her 
sixth course for the minor) take the elective designated in the previ- 
ous year as the American Studies seminar. For further information 
on the American Studies minor, and application forms, see Professor 
Carlo Rotella, English Department (617-552-1655). Also consult 
the American Studies website at http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/ 
amerstudies/americanstudies.html. 

Ancient Civilization 

The minor in Ancient Civilization aims at providing students 
from various majors the opportunity to study those aspects of the 
ancient Greek and Roman world that relate to their fields and their 
other interests without the requirement of learning the Latin and 
Greek languages. Each student will design his/her own program in 
consultation with the faculty. A program will consist of a coherent 
blend of six courses chosen from two groups: 

• Greek Civilization and Roman Civilization. These general 
courses, which the department now offers every second year, 
serve as a general overview of the field and an introduction to 
the minor. 

• Four other courses, chosen after consultation with the direc- 
tor, from available offerings in Classics and other departments 
in the areas of literature, philosophy, religion, art and archae- 
ology, history, and linguistics. 

A list of the courses that are available each semester from the 
various departments and that can count for the minor will be pub- 
lished at registration time. Interested students should contact Prof 
Charles Ahern, Chairperson of the Classical Studies Department. 
Also consult the Classics website at http:// fmwww.bc.edu/ 
CL/minor.html. 
Asian Studies 

The Asian Studies minor enables a student to study the lan- 
guage, history and culture of the Far East from a number of disci- 
plinary perspectives. Requirements are as follows: (1) an introducto- 
ry course, usually SL 263 Far Eastern Civilizations, (2) 1 course in 
Asian history or political structure or diplomacy, (3) 2 courses in an 
Asian language beyond the elementary level, and (4) 2 approved 
elective courses in Asian Studies from related areas. One of these 
electives may be a directed senior research paper on an approved 
topic. Further information is available from the Director, Prof M. J. 
Connolly, Slavic and Eastern Languages Department, Lyons 210, 
617-552-3912. Also consult the Slavic and Eastern Languages web- 
site at http://fmwww.bc.edu/SL/. 
Black Studies 

Black Studies at Boston College is an interdisciplinary program 
that offers or cosponsors courses in several disciplines. Through 
courses in history, literature, sociology, philosophy, theology, and the 
arts, students may pursue a variety of approaches to understanding 
the Black experience. In addition, the Black Studies Program spon- 
sors a 4-week summer study program in the Caribbean for under- 
graduates who have completed at least one Black Studies course. The 



minor in Black Studies requires six courses to be distributed over 
three departments. Students interested in the minor should enroll in 
BK 104-BK 105 (HS 283-HS 284) Afro-American History I/II, in 
their sophomore year. They will choose three electives at least one of 
which must deal with Africa or the Caribbean in the following areas: 
humanities (language, literature, music, philosophy, theater, theolo- 
gy); social sciences (communications, interdisciplinary seminar, or 
senior project. For further information on the Caribbean summer 
study program or the Black Studies minor, please contact Dr. Frank 
Taylor, Lyons 301, 617-552-3238. Also consult the program website 
at http://fmwww.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/blksp/. 
Cognitive Science 

Cognitive Science studies the human mind from the view- 
points of several different disciplines because it believes that the 
human mind is too complex to be understood from the viewpoint of 
any one discipline alone. The Cognitive Science minor introduces 
students to this exciting interdisciplinary field. The minor consists of 
six courses— three foundation courses in three of the four component 
disciplines of psychology, computer science, linguistics (Department 
of Slavic and Eastern Languages) and philosophy, and at least three 
specialty courses in a single discipline. For further information, con- 
sult the Cognitive Science minor webpage: www.es. be. edu/^kugel/ 
CogSciMinor.html, or contact Prof Peter Kugel of the Computer 
Science Department at kugel@bc.edu. 
East European Studies 

The East European Studies minor requires six approved cours- 
es, distributed as follows: 

• 1 introductory course either SL 284 Russian Civilization or 
SL 231 Slavic Civilizations 

• 1 additional course in Russian or East European history or 
politics 

• 2 courses in Russian or another East European language at or 
above the intermediate level 

• 2 approved elective courses from related areas such as: Art 
History, Economics, Film Studies, literature or language. 
Philosophy, or Theology. One of these electives may be a 
directed senior research paper on an approved topic. 

Further information is available from the Director, Prof 
Cynthia Simmons, Slavic and Eastern Languages Department, 
Lyons 210, 617-552-3914. Students may also consult the Slavic and 
Eastern Languages website at http://fmwww.bc.edu/SL/. 
Environmental Studies 

Environmental Studies provides an interdisciplinary approach 
to understanding the science and policy of the earth's environmental 
challenges, designed to complement any undergraduate major. The 
goals of the minor are three-fold: (1) to help undergraduates develop 
an awareness of the scientific, cultural, and political aspects of the 
world's environmental problems, (2) to better prepare students for 
careers in the expanding field of the environmental professions, and 
(3) to provide preparation for further study at the graduate or pro- 
fessional school level. These goals are achieved through a dynamic 
curriculum as well as research opportunities both on and off-campus. 

All Environmental Studies minors must take two foundation 
courses chosen from a specified list of environmental science and 
policy courses, three advanced courses to be chosen from upper-level 
offerings in various departments, and a senior seminar. Extensive 
opportunities are available for supervised internships in science and 
policy including the Environmental Scholars Program that is con- 
ducted with and funded by the Urban Ecology Institute at Boston 
College. 



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For further information or to register for this program, see the 
Director, Dr. Eric Strauss, or the program assistant, Mr. Bruce 
Travis, in Higgins Hall (617-552-0735), or visit the program web- 
site at http://vvww2.bc.edu/^strausse/esp. 
Faith, Peace, and Justice 

The Faith, Peace and Justice minor offers students the oppor- 
tunity to explore, in an interdisciplinary manner, how their own seri- 
ous questions about faith, peace and justice are related to concrete 
work for peace and justice in our world. The goals of the FPJ 
Program are to help undergraduate students acquire and develop 
skills in (1) empirical, social scientific analysis of concrete issues for 
justice and peace, (2) gaining a solid grasp of the ethical and justice 
principles which arise from these issues, (3) learning how to formu- 
late public policy or to initiate social change that would help to solve 
these problems, and (4) implementing creative methods for conflict 
resolution, appropriate for the level of problem solving their partic- 
ular issues require. 

To achieve these goals, each student is required to take the 
introductory course for the minor, UN 160:The Challenge of Justice, 
and, in their senior year, UN 590: FPJ Senior Seminar. In addition, 
the students design, with the advice and approval of the FPJ Director, 
a cluster of four elective courses which aims at an interdisciplinary 
course of study focused on a theme or concern for justice and peace 
which they themselves have identified. This cluster is the foundation 
for the student's written thesis in the Senior Seminar. For further 
information, or to register for the FPJ minor, see the Director, Prof. 
Matthew MuUane, Carney 429. 
Film Studies 

The Film Studies minor, a joint undertaking of the Fine Arts 
and Communication Departments, assists students in developing 
critical and technical abilities in the area of film. The minor consists 
of two required courses and four electives. Normally, a student 
begins with either FM 283 History of European Cinema or FM 202 
Introduction to Film Art. The other required course is FS 171 Film 
Making. The four electives may be chosen from the areas of film his- 
tory and criticism, film or video production, communications or 
photography. At least one of these electives must be taken in the 
Communication Department. 

Students interested in the Film Studies minor may contact one 
of the Co-Directors, Prof John Michalczyk in Devlin 424 or Prof 
Richard Blake, S.J., in Devlin 416, 617-552-4295, or consuk the web- 
site at http;//www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/fnart/film/ default.html. 
German Studies 

The interdisciplinary minor in German Studies offers students 
an introduction to the language and cultures of Germany, Austria 
and Switzerland. The foremost goal of the program is to provide par- 
ticipants with an understanding of the history of German-speaking 
civilization, but also to acquaint them with Germany's place in 
today's world. 

The interdisciplinary minor in German Studies consists of six 
upper division courses: Germany Divided and Reunited (CM 242), 
two additional courses from the Department of German studies, and 
three courses from other departments. All students minoring in 
German Studies are strongly encouraged to spend one semester abroad. 

Interested students should contact the Director of the Minor, 
Prof. Rachel Freudenburg, Department of German Studies, Lyons 
201F (617-552-3745; freudenr@bc.edu), or consult the website at 
http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/ger/frdept.html. 
International Studies 

The minor in International Studies is designed to prepare stu- 
dents to become aware and effective citizens in an increasingly interde- 



pendent international environment. The six required courses focus on 
cultural, political and economic relations among states, international 
organizations, multinational corporations and social movements. 
Working with an advisor, students select a cluster of courses from a the- 
matic focus (Development Studies, International Political Economy, 
Causes of International Peace and War, Ethics of International 
Relations) as well as from their region of emphasis. They must com- 
plete two introductory courses, a senior seminar and a senior paper. 

The program strongly encourages foreign study and advanced 
study of a foreign language. It provides a foundation for careers in 
government, business, non-profit organizations, international insti- 
tutions or journalism as well as preparation for graduate study. 
Guidelines for the International Studies minor and an application 
are available at the International Studies Program Office located in 
Hovey House, Room 108, or on the International Studies website at 
http://www.bc.edu/isp. Students may also consult the Director, Prof 
David Deese, Political Science Department, McGuinn 217 (617- 
552-4585; deese@bc.edu) or the academic advisor, Linda Gray 
MacKay, Hovey House 108 (617-552-0740; mackayli@bc.edu). 
Irish Studies 

Irish Studies, an integral part of Boston College's distin- 
guished Irish Programs, offers an interdisciplinary approach to the 
culture and society of Ireland. Individual courses cover the areas of 
social, political, and economic history, literature, drama and theatre, 
medieval art, sociology, and the Irish language. In addition, there are 
several courses that are jointly taught by faculty from various disci- 
plines. These include a three-semester sequence of courses integrat- 
ing the history and literature of Ireland from the eighteenth to the 
twentieth centuries. 

For Irish Studies minors, the Irish Studies Program offers first- 
semester senior year courses at University College Cork and 
University College Galway. The program at University College Cork 
provides extensive exposure in areas of Irish culture not ordinarily 
available in the United States, such as archeology, ethnography, folk- 
lore, and anthropology. The program at University College Galway 
offers intensive study in the Irish language for students who have had 
experience with the language. Interested students should apply to 
the Center for International Programs and Partnerships and see 
Professor Kevin O'Neill, History Department or Professor Robert 
Savage, Irish Studies Program. 

The Abbey Theatre Summer Workshop consists of an intensive 
five weeks of classes, lectures, and demonstrations by members of the 
Abbey Theatre Company in acting, directing, production, and man- 
agement, culminating in the staging of an Irish play. There will also 
be lectures in the history of Irish theater. Interested students should 
apply to Professor Philip O'Leary, English Department before March 
1 . Registration for this program takes place in the fall semester only. 

Students minoring in Irish Studies are eligible for the Maeve 
O'Reilly Finley Fellowship to be used for graduate study in Ireland. 
This fellowship will be awarded annually to an Irish Studies minor. 

Students interested in the Irish Studies Program should con- 
tact Prof Robert Savage, Irish Studies Program (617-552-3966) or 
Prof Kevin O'Neill, History Department (617-552-3793). Students 
may also consult the Irish Studies website at http://www.bc.edu/ 
bc_org/avp/cas/irish/. 

Italian Studies 

The minor in Italian Studies, an interdisciplinary program creat- 
ed by the Departments of Fine Arts, History, and Romance Languages, 
invites students to learn about the important role that the people of the 
Italian peninsula have played in the development of Western civiliza- 
tion. Courses cover Italian history, art, film and literature. 



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For further information, contact Prof Franco Mormando, 
S.J., Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Lyons Hall 
307C, 617-552-6346. Also see the Italian Studies minor website at 
http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/romlang/itminor.html. 
Latin American Studies 

The Latin American Studies program encompasses faculty and 
courses from across the University. With academic advisement from 
participating faculty, students can shape the Latin American Studies 
minor to fit usefully with their academic major and with the ambi- 
tions they hope to pursue after graduation. Students may earn a 
minor in Latin American Studies by completing six courses from at 
least three different academic departments, selected from among 
courses approved for the program. Proficiency in Spanish or 
Portuguese that is equivalent to successful completion of a third-year 
college language course is required for the minor. 

Students seeking to earn a minor in Latin American Studies 
must submit a proposed plan of study to the Director of the pro- 
gram, usually no later than the second semester of the sophomore 
year. The Director, in consultation with the student and other facul- 
ty in the program, will review the proposal, and notify the student 
of his/her acceptance into the minor. 

For further information contact the Director, Prof. Douglas 
Marcouiller, S.J. Also see the Latin American Studies website at 
http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/latin/. 
Middle Eastern Studies 

This program emphasizes the interdisciplinary study of the 
Middle East from the rise of Islam in the seventh century to the pre- 
sent. Through a sequence of courses it offers preparation in Middle 
Eastern Studies useful for careers such as journalism, diplomacy, 
business, and social service as well as graduate programs of academ- 
ic and professional training. Courses cover the social, economic, 
political, cultural, and religious heritage as well as contemporary 
developments in their regional and world settings. 

Students interested in the program should contact Prof. Ali 
Banuazizi, Psychology Department, McGuinn 324 (617-552-4124) 
or Prof Benjamin Braude, History Department, Carney 172 (617- 
552-3787) or consult the program website at http://fmwww.bc.edu/ 
ColLAS/middleeasternminor. 
Scientific Computation 

The minor in Scientific Computation is an interdisciplinary 
program drawing on faculty in several departments, which comple- 
ments students' training in the natural and social sciences. The 
minor focuses on applications of the computational methodologies 
developed in physics, chemistry, mathematics, economics and 
finance for empirical research. Students selecting the minor will be 
exposed to a wide range of computational techniques of practical 
value in solving empirical and modeling problems. 

Six courses are required for the minor: two mathematics 
courses (MT 202 and MT 210), one course in scientific program- 
ming (PH 330, cross listed), one course in numerical methods and 
scientific computation (PH 430, cross listed), one elective course, 
and a capstone course in advanced scientific computation. 
Attendance at a senior seminar is also required. 

For further information on the Scientific Computation minor, 
see Prof Jan Engelbrecht, Physics (jan@bc.edu), or Prof Christopher 
Baum, Economics (baum@bc.edu), codirectors of the minor, or see 
the website at http://fmwww.bc.edu/CSC/. 
Women's Studies 

The Women's Studies Program is an interdisciplinary forum for 
the study of women's past and present position in society. Women's 
Studies analyzes the similarities and differences among women as a 



result of such factors as race, class, religion, and sexuality. The con- 
cept of gender relations is considered a primary factor in our under- 
standing of women's roles in various institutions and societies. The 
Women's Studies Program offers an interdisciplinary minor that con- 
sists of two required courses: Introduction to Feminisms (EN 125, PS 
125, SC 225) and Advanced Colloquium in Women's Studies (EN 
593), plus four additional courses (selected from a range of disci- 
plines). Students may decide to minor in Women's Studies any time 
prior to graduation provided that the requisite scope and number of 
courses have been satisfactorily completed. 

For more information consult the Director of the minor. 
Professor Lisa Cuklanz, Communication Department (617-552- 
8894), and the Women's Studies website at http://www.bc.edu/ 
bc_org/avp/cas/ws/test.html. 

Minors in the Lynch School of Education for Arts 
and Sciences Students 

Arts and Sciences students completing minors in the Lynch 
School of Education must fulfill all major. Core, and elective 
requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences and have credit in 
at least 32 Arts and Sciences courses. 
Secondary Education 

Students majoring in Biology, Chemistry, Classical Studies, 
English, a Foreign Language, History, Mathematics, Geology, 
Physics, or Theology (not for certification) in the College of Arts 
and Sciences may apply to minor in Education. This program begins 
in the junior year and interested students should contact the 
Coordinator of Secondary Education or the Office of the Assistant 
Dean for Students and Outreach in the Lynch School of Education 
during the sophomore year. Only those students majoring in the dis- 
ciplines listed above may apply for a minor in Secondary Education. 

N.B. Students majoring in English have additional require- 
ments. Consult the Secondary Handbook and the advisor for these 
requirements. 
General Education 

Students who have an interest in Education may follow a 
minor of five or six courses with their advisors' approval. This pro- 
gram does not lead to certification, but does offer students an intro- 
duction to programs that could be pursued on the graduate level. 
The following courses constitute a minor in Education: Child 
Growth and Development; Family, School, and Society; Psychology 
of Learning; Classroom Assessment; Working with Special Needs 
Children; and one Education elective as an optional sixth course. 

Special Academic Programs 
Departmental Honors 

The designation of departmental honors is reserved for above 
average students who have demonstrated academic achievements in 
additional or more difficult courses, or by successfully undertaking 
an approved research project, as determined by each department. 
For further information, consult department listings. 
Independent Major 

Under usual circumstances, students are advised to follow the 
formal educational programs offered by departments. In rare 
instances, for students with special interests that cannot be satisfied 
in a regular major, double major, or a combined major and minor, 
the Educational Policy Committee will approve an interdisciplinary 
Independent Major. Students who wish to apply for an Independent 
Major must normally have achieved a minimum 3.2 grade point 
average. The student must plan, with the aid of a faculty advisor, a 
program of twelve courses, ten of which must be upper-division 
courses. These will extend over no more than three departments and 



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will be selected in accordance with a clearly defined unifying princi- 
ple. This program should be equal in depth and coherence to a typ- 
ical departmental major and should include a plan for a final project 
or paper that demonstrates the intellectual coherence of the 
Independent Major and for ongoing assessment of the program by 
the student and the advisor. Each proposed major should be sub- 
mitted to the Dean's Office before March 1 of the student's sopho- 
more year. The Dean will then present it to the Educational Policy 
Committee for approval. An Independent Major will ordinarily be 
the student's only major. 
Scholar of the College 

Scholar of the College is a designation given at commence- 
ment to exceptional scholars who have done independent work of 
the highest quality for a significant part of their senior year under the 
supervision of scholars in their major fields (or in two or more fields 
in the case of an interdisciplinary project). The program is adminis- 
tered by the Dean's office. Students will present proposals for review 
by their major departments at the end of their junior year. 
Departments will permit those students who present strong propos- 
als and have a minimum GPA of 3.67 to register for a 6-credit 
Advanced Independent Research for the fall and spring of their 
senior year. (In exceptional cases, seniors who develop a particularly 
ambitious 3-credit thesis project in the fall semester may be recom- 
mended by their advisors for the 6-credit Advanced Independent 
Research in the spring.) When the Advanced Independent Research 
projects are completed, advisors will nominate the most distin- 
guished for Scholar of the College recognition at Commencement. 
The final decision will be made by a committee appointed by the 
Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 
International Study Program 

The International Study Program provides Boston College 
students with a very wide range of opportunities to become conver- 
sant with another culture and fluent in a foreign language. Students 
wishing to spend a junior year or a semester abroad and transfer the 
credits earned to their Boston College degree must receive approval 
from a Dean and enroll in a program approved by the College. To 
qualify for Dean's approval, a student must (1) have a 3.2 average in 
the major and approximately the same in general average, (2) have 
completed a significant number of courses in the major and have 
made substantial progress on Core requirements, (3) have the 
approval of the Chairperson of the major department, and (4) for 
those who have not completed the language proficiency require- 
ment, have successfully completed a minimum of one year of college 
level language study. Final approval will be given by the Deans on 
the basis of the student's academic record at the end of the sopho- 
more year. Students should begin the application process by con- 
sulting the website of the Center for International Programs and 
Partnerships at http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/acavp/inprg. 
Bachelor of Arts-Master of Social Work Program 

The College of Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School of 
Social Work offer a dual degree program for a limited number of 
undergraduate psychology and sociology majors. During the sopho- 
more year interested students take two prerequisites (Statistics and 
Introduction to Social Work) and apply for formal acceptance in the 
Program. They must meet all standard requirements for admission 
to the Graduate School of Social Work and complete all its founda- 
tion courses by the end of the senior year; at which time they receive 
the B.A. degree. They then enroll as Second Year M.S.W. candidates 
for their fifth and final year. Further information may be obtained 



from the Graduate School of Social Work Admissions Office, 
McGuinn Hall, the Departments of Psychology and Sociology 
(McGuinn), and the Arts and Sciences Dean's Office (Gasson 109). 
Fifth Year B.A./M.A. 

The College of Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School of 
Arts and Sciences offer a 5-year B.A./M.A. program in some disci- 
plines. Application to the program normally takes place early in the 
second semester of the junior year. The applicant must complete an 
application to the Master's degree program in the Graduate School 
of Arts and Sciences (McGuinn 221). Admission to the B.A./M.A. 
program normally requires an overall GPA of 3.33, and a GPA of 3.5 
in the major. Although specific B.A./M.A. program requirements 
will vary across departments, the program requires that among the 
38 courses taken for the Bachelor's degree the student will take two 
courses at the graduate level that will be counted toward both 
degrees. The student will complete the Master's degree with eight 
additional graduate courses and the other Master's degree require- 
ments specified by the department. 

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 

The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences offers programs of 
study leading to the degrees of Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), 
Master of Arts (M.A.), and Master of Science (M.S.). The Graduate 
School also may admit as Special Students those not seeking a degree 
who are interested in pursuing course work for personal enrichment. 
General Information 

The Graduate Admissions Office, McGuinn Hall 221, is open 
from 8:45 A.M. to 4:45 P.M., Monday through Friday, to assist per- 
sons making preliminary inquiries. Application materials for U.S. 
citizens or for those who have official permanent U.S. resident sta- 
tus are included in the Graduate School Bulletin. The Bulletin may be 
obtained either from the department in which students hope to 
study or from the Graduate Admissions Office. All non-U. S. citizens 
should obtain their application materials from the Graduate 
Admissions Office as additional documents are required of them and 
additional information is provided for them. 

The Schedule of Courses is published by the Office of Student 
Services prior to each semester's registration period. The 
International Student Office, the Office of the Dean for Student 
Development, and the Graduate Student Association provide non- 
academic services for students. 

Master's Degree Programs 

Requirements for Degrees of Master of Arts and Master 

of Science 

Acceptance 

Candidates for the Master's degree must generally be graduates 
of an accredited college with at least 18 semester hours of upper divi- 
sion work in the proposed area of study. In case of deficiencies, pre- 
requisites may be earned in the graduate school by achieving a min- 
imum grade of B in courses approved for this purpose. Where there 
is some doubt about a scholastic record, acceptance may be condi- 
tional. The candidate will then be evaluated by the department and 
recommended to the Dean for approval after the first semester of 
course work or after earning a minimum of 6 credits. 
Course Credits 

A minimum of 30 graduate credits is required for each Master's 
degree. No formal minor is required, but, with the approval of his or 
her major department, a student may take a limited number of cred- 
its in a closely related area. No more than 6 graduate credits will be 
accepted in transfer toward fulfillment of course requirements, as 
described more fully under "Transfer of Credit." 



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Fifth Year B.A./M.A. 

In cooperation with the College of Arts and Sciences, the 
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences offers a 5-year B.A./M.A. pro- 
gram in some disciplines. See the Undergraduate College of Arts and 
Sciences for further information. 

Special Programs 

• Master of Arts in Biblical Studies: See Department of 
Theology. 

• Master of Arts in Irish Studies: See Department of English. 

• Master of Arts in Medieval Studies: See Department of 
History. 

• Master of Arts in Slavic Studies: See Department of Slavic 
and Eastern Languages. 

Dual Degree Programs 

• Master of Science/Master of Business Administration: See 
Departments of Biology or Geology/Geophysics, and the 
Carroll Graduate School of Management. 

• Master of Arts/Master of Business Administration: See 
Departments of Mathematics, Political Science, Romance 
Languages and Literatures, or Slavic and Eastern Languages, 
and the Carroll Graduate School of Management. 

• Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry/Master of Social Work: 
See Institute of Religious Education and Pastoral Ministry, 
and the Graduate School of Social Work. 

• Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry/Master of Arts in 
Counseling Psychology: See Institute of Religious Education 
and Pastoral Ministry, and Lynch School of Education. 

• Master of Arts in Pastoral Ministry/Master of Science in 
Nursing: See Institute of Religious Education and Pastoral 
Ministry, and Graduate School of Nursing. 

• Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology/Master of Business 
Administration: See Department of Sociology and the 
Carroll Graduate School of Management. 

Doctoral Degree Programs 

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy 

The Ph.D. degree is granted only for distinction attained in a 
special field of concentration and demonstrated ability to modify or 
enlarge a significant subject in a dissertation based upon original 
research conspicuous for its scholarship. 

The minimum requirement for the Ph.D. is that the doctoral 
student follow a unified and organized program of study. Additional 
information regarding specific programs of study at the doctoral 
level will be found under departmental listings. Detailed statements 
of requirements and procedures should be requested directly from 
the department in which the student has an interest. 
Residence 

The philosophy of the residence requirement is that a doctoral 
student should experience the total environment of the University. 
Residence for at least two consecutive semesters of one academic 
year, during which the student is registered as a full-time student in 
the University, is required. A plan of studies that meets this require- 
ment must be arranged by the student with the department. 
Registration in two courses per semester is considered to fulfill the 
residency requirement for students holding full-year fellowships and 
assistantships. The residence requirement may not be satisfied, in 
whole or in part, by summer session attendance. 



Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program 

Where departmental doctoral programs are unable to satisfy 
the interests of the student, an interdisciplinary doctoral program 
remains a possibility. However, students must first be admitted to a 
departmental program. A student interested in exploring such a pos- 
sibility should first make an inquiry to the Graduate School Office. 

Special Students (Non-Degree) 

Students not seeking a degree, but who are interested in pursu- 
ing course work at the graduate level, may apply for admission as spe- 
cial students. Many individuals enter departments of the Graduate 
School as special students — either to explore the seriousness of their 
interest in studying for an advanced degree or to strengthen their cre- 
dentials for possible later application for degree study. Others are sim- 
ply interested in taking graduate course work for interest's sake or for 
other purposes. Admission as a special student does not guarantee 
subsequent admission for degree candidacy. Individuals who are 
admitted as special students and who subsequently wish to apply for 
admission as degree candidates must file additional application doc- 
uments and be accepted for degree study. The number of credits one 
has earned as a special student that may be applied toward the 
requirements of a degree is determined by the appropriate depart- 
ment in concert with Graduate School regulations. 

Those admitted as special students may take courses only in the 
department that has recommended their admission. Permission to 
continue to take courses as a special student beyond the semester for 
which admission was originally gained must be obtained from the 
admitting department's Graduate Program Director. While required, 
gaining such permission is not considered to be the same as an orig- 
inal application for admission; consequently, a second application 
fee is not required. 

Admission 

Eligibility and Application Information 

The Boston College Graduate School of Arts and Sciences is an 
academic community whose doors are open to all students without 
regard to race, religion, age, sex, marital or parental status, national 
origin or handicap. Opportunities and experiences are offered to all 
students on an equal basis and in such a way as to recognize and 
appreciate their individual and cultural differences. 

Applicants for admission to the Graduate School ordinarily 
must possess at least a bachelor's degree from an accredited institu- 
tion and give evidence of the ability and preparation necessary for 
the satisfactory pursuit of graduate studies. This evidence consists 
primarily, but not exclusively, in the distribution of undergraduate 
courses and the grades received in them. Consult the appropriate 
departmental descriptions for additional specific requirements. 

Individuals lacking a bachelor's degree generally are not admit- 
ted to Graduate School classes. In order to attend graduate classes, 
persons lacking the bachelor's degree should apply for authorization 
either through the Dean of the College of Advancing Studies or, in 
the case of Boston College undergraduates, through their appropri- 
ate dean and with the approval of the chairperson of the given 
department. Such students will receive only undergraduate credit for 
the course taken in the Graduate School, and the course credit will 
be entered only on their undergraduate record. For regulations gov- 
erning the simultaneous Master's/Bachelor's degree, one should con- 
sult his or her own department. 

The Graduate School accepts two classes of applicants: degree 
students (degree-seeking) and special students (non-degree-seeking). 

A completed application to the Graduate School includes 
forms that provide biographical information, official transcripts, and 
references. All of these documents will be found in the Graduate 



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School of Arts and Sciences Bulletin, along with complete instructions 
for their submission. For possible additional required credentials, 
e.g., GRE scores, etc., consult the requirements of the Department 
to which admission is being sought. All application materials should 
be sent to the Graduate Admissions Office, McGuinn Hall 221. 

Applicants for special student status should consult the 
Graduate Arts and Sciences Bulletin regarding required application 
documents. All application materials should he sent to the Graduate 
School Admissions Office, McGuinn Hall 221. 

Degree and special students are not admitted officially until the 
completed application form with a positive department recommen- 
dation has been approved by the Assistant Dean. Admission should 
not be presumed without receipt of official notification from the 
Assistant Dean. 

Degree-seeking applicants should consult the department of 
specialization regarding the specific requirements for the various 
departmental master's, C.A.G.S., and doctoral programs. 

For the necessary application forms and information, domestic 
students (U.S. citizens and permanent resident non-U.S. citizens) 
should address their requests to the department of interest or to the 
Graduate Admissions Office. 

Foreign students (non-U.S. citizens who are not permanent 
U.S. residents) should address their requests to the Graduate School 
of Arts and Sciences, Admissions Office, McGuinn Hall 221. 

Information on the GRE tests also may be obtained from the 
Educational Testing Service, Box 955, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 
or at www.gre.org. 

All documents submitted by applicants for admission become 
the property of the Graduate School and are not returnable. 
Applicants who are accepted by the Graduate School, but do not 
register for course work at the indicated time will have their docu- 
ments kept on file for twelve months after the date of submission. 
After that time, the documents will be destroyed and the applicants 
must provide new ones if they later decide to begin graduate study. 

Acceptance 

Announcements of acceptance or rejection are usually mailed 
on or about April 1 5 for September admissions, but may vary by 
department. Decisions are made on the basis of departmental rec- 
ommendations and the fulfillment of prerequisites. No student 
should presume admission until he or she has been notified official- 
ly of acceptance by the Assistant Dean. 

GSA&S Programs and Degrees 

Biblical Studies (Theology): M.A. 
Biology: Ph.D. M.S., M.S.T 
Chemistry: Ph.D., M.S., M.S.T. 
Classical Lang.: M.A., M.A.T. 
Economics: Ph.D., M.A. 
English: Ph.D., M.A., M.A.T 
Geology/Geophysics: M.S., M.S.T. 
History: Ph.D., M.A., M.A.T. 
Irish Literature and Culture (English): M.A. 
Irish Studies (History): Ph.D. 
Linguistics: M.A./M.B.A. 
Mathematics: M.A., M.S.T/M.B.A. 
Medieval Studies (History): Ph.D., M.A. 
Medieval Studies (Romance Lang.): Ph.D. 
Pastoral Ministry: M.A./M.A./M.S./M.S.W. 
Philosophy: Ph.D., M.A. 
Physics: Ph.D., M.S., M.S.T. 
PoUtical Science: Ph.D., M.A./M.B.A. 
Psychology: Ph.D., M.A. 



Religion and Education: Ph.D. 

Romance Languages: Ph.D., M.A., M.A.T./M.B.A. 

Russian: M.A./M.B.A. 

Slavic Studies: M.A./M.B.A. 

Sociology: Ph.D., M.A./M.B.A. 

Theology: Ph.D., M.A. 

Financial Aid 

Academic Awards 

Stipends and scholarships are available to aid promising stu- 
dents in the pursuit of their studies, including: 

• University Fellowships 

• Teaching Fellowships 

• Teaching Assistantships 

• Graduate Assistantships 

• Research Assistantships 

• Tuition Scholarships 

Individuals whose applications are complete will routinely be 
considered for financial aid by the department in which they hope 
to study; no separate application is necessary. The scholastic require- 
ments for obtaining these stipend awards or scholarship awards are 
necessarily more exacting than those for simply securing admission 
to the Graduate School. 

Fellowships 

University Fellowships 

University Fellowships are available in some departments offer- 
ing the Ph.D. degree. These awards, which provide a stipend, and may 
include up to a full tuition scholarship, do not require specific services. 

Fellowships for American Minority Group Students 

The Graduate School sponsors several fellowships specifically for 
American minority group students. These fellowships carry tuition 
scholarships and stipends ofSl6,000 for the 2002-03 academic year 
and do not require specific services. Interested students should write 
directly to the Director of Admissions and Financial Aid, Attention: 
Minority Student Fellowship Program for further particulars. All 
applicants, of course, are routinely considered for the various types of 
financial aid that are available in the Graduate School. 

Teaching Fellowships 

The Graduate School has available a limited number of 
Teaching Fellowships. These provide for a stipend that varies among 
departments. The Teaching Fellow, in addition to his or her program 
of studies, is usually responsible for six hours of teaching in the 
undergraduate colleges. 

Assistantships 

Graduate Assistantships and Teaching Assistantships 

Assistantships are available in most departments. Generally, the 
Assistants in the natural science departments assist in laboratory 
activities. In these and other departments the Assistants may be oth- 
erwise involved in the academic activities of the department. The 
nature and number of hours involved are determined by the depart- 
ment Chairperson. 

Assistantships provide a stipend that varies among 
departments. 

Research Assistantships 

Research Assistantships are available in some departments. The 
stipends are similar, but not uniform among the departments. 
Summer research opportunities are also available on some research 
projects. For further information, contact the Chairperson of the 
department. 



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49 



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Tuition Scholarships 

Tuition scholarships are awarded to a Umited number of stu- 
dents based on academic achievement and promise. 

Procedures for Financial Aid Recipients 

At the opening of each school year, or at whatever other time 
financial aid may be awarded, recipients of fellowships and assist- 
antships must report to the Graduate Admissions Office to fill out 
personnel and tax information forms. 

An aid recipient who relinquishes a fellowship, assistantship or 
a tuition scholarship must report this matter in writing to the 
department Chairperson and to the Dean. These awards may be dis- 
continued at any time during an academic year if either the acade- 
mic performance or in-service assistance is of an unsatisfactory char- 
acter. They may also be discontinued for conduct injurious to the 
reputation of the University. 

Other Sources of Financial Aid 

Students interested in other sources of financial aid, such as 
work-study funds and various loan programs, should inquire at the 
Office of Student Services where all such aid is administered. Refer 
to the earlier section on financial aid in this catalog and to the 
Graduate School Bulletin. 

Biochemistry 

Program Description 

This interdisciplinary major in Biochemistry, administered 
jointly by the Chemistry and Biology Departments, provides the 
student with a broad background in Biochemistry and related cours- 
es in Chemistry and Biology. This major is intended for those inter- 
ested in the more chemical and molecular aspects of the life sciences. 

The minimum requirements for the Biochemistry major are as 
follows: 

Two semesters of General Chemistry and laboratory 

CH 109-110 (orCH 117- 118) lecture 

CH 111-112 (or CH 119-120) laboratory 

Two semesters of Introductory Biology 

BI 200-202 lecture 

Two semesters of Organic Chemistry and laboratory 

CH 231-232 (or CH 241-242) lecture 

CH 233-234 (or CH 243-244) laboratory 

Two semesters of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics 

BI 304-305 lecture 

Two semesters of Biology laboratory 

BI 310 Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory I 

BI 31 1 Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory II 

One semester of Analytical Chemistry and laboratory 

CH 351 lecture and laboratory 

One semester of Physical Chemistry 

CH 473 lecture 

Two semesters of Biochemistry/Molecular Biology 

CH 561-562 Biochemistry I and II lecture or 

BI 435 and BI 440 Biological Chemistry, Molecular Biology 

lecture 

One semester of Biochemistry laboratory 

BI 480 or CH 563 laboratory 

Two advanced electives from the following list: 

BI 454 Introduction to the Literature of Biochemistry 

BI 474 Principles of Metabolism 

BI 506 Recombinant DNA Technology 

BI 509 Vertebrate Cell Biology 

BI 515 Biophysical Chemistry 

BI 535 Structural Biochemistry of Neurological Diseases 



BI 556 Developmental Biology 
BI 558 Neurogenetics 
BI 570 Biology of the Nucleus 
CH 564 Physical Methods in Biochemistry 
CH 565 Chemical Biology: Nucleic Acids 
CH 566 Bioinorganic Chemistry 
CH 567 Chemical Biology: Structure and Function 
CH 569 Chemical Biology: Enzyme Mechanisms 
CH 570 Introduction to Biological Membranes 
CH 582 Advanced Topics in Biochemistry 
CH 588 Computational Biochemistry 

In addition to the above, the following courses are also 
required: 

• Two semesters of Physics with laboratory 
PH 211-212 lecture and laboratory 

• Two semesters of Calculus 
MT 100-101 lecture 

* Students are also strongly urged to engage in a Senior Research 
project under the direction of a faculty member involved in bio- 
chemical research. With approval,* this year-long project may replace 
the requirement for Biochemistry Laboratory (BI 480 or CH 563). 
BI 463-464 Research in Biochemistry* 

CH 593-594 Introduction to Biochemical Research* or BI 
399, CH 399 Advanced Independent Research* 

*With approval of Professor Kantrowitz (Merkert 239) or 
Professor Annunziato (Higgins 422) 
Course Sequence 
First Year 

Introductory Biology (BI 200-202) 

General Chemistry (CH 109-110 or CH 117-118) with labo- 
ratory 

Calculus (MT 100-101) 
Second Year (Fall) 

Physics (PH 211) with laboratory 

Organic Chemistry (CH 231 or CH 241) with laboratory 
Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (BI 304) 
Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory I (BI 310) 
Second Year (Spring) 

Physics (PH 212) with laboratory 

Organic Chemistry (CH 232 or CH 242) with laboratory 
Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (BI 305) 
Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics Laboratory II (BI 311) 
Third Year (Fall) 

Biological Chemistry (BI 435) or Biochemistry I (CH 561) 
Analytical Chemistry (CH 351) 

Third Year (Spring) 

Molecular Biology (BI 440) or Biochemistry II (CH 562) 

Physical Chemistry (CH 473) 
Fourth Year 

Biochemistry Laboratory (BI 480 or CH 563) 

Two advanced electives 

For additional information, contact either Professor 
Kantrowitz (Merkert 239) or Professor Annunziato (Higgins 422). 



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Biology 

Faculty 

Joseph Orlando, Associate Professor Emeritus; B.S., Merrimack 

College; M.S., North Carolina State College; Ph.D., University of 

California, Berkeley 

Yu-Chen Ting, Professor Emeritus; A.B., National Honan 

University; M.S., University of Kentucky; M.S.A., Cornell 

University; Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

Anthony T. Annunziato, Professor; B.S., Boston College; M.S., 

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

David Burgess, Professor; B.S., M.S., California State Polytechnic 

University: Ph.D.; University of California, Davis 

Charles S. Hoffman, Professor; S.B., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology; Ph.D., Tufts University 

Daniel Kirschner, Professor; B.A., Western Reserve University; 

Ph.D., Harvard University 

Marc A.T. Muskavitch, Professor; Chairperson of the Department; 

B.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph.D., Stanford 

University 

Thomas N. Seyftied, Professor; B.A., St. Francis College; M.S., 

Illinois State University; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

Grant W. Balkema, Associate Professor; B.S., Ph.D., Purdue 

University 

Thomas Chiles, Associate Professor; BS., Ph.D., University of 

Florida 

Mary Kathleen Dunn, Associate Professor; B.A., University of 

Kansas; M.A., Michigan State University; Ph.D., University of 

North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Jonathan J. Goldthwaite, Associate Professor; B.S., University of 

Massachusetts, Amherst; Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Clare Oi'Q.oa-aoT., Associate Professor; B.S., Ph.D., Purdue 

University 

William H. Petri, Asociate Professor; A.B., Ph.D., University of 

California, Berkeley 

Donald J. Plocke, S.J., Associate Professor; B.S., Yale University; 

A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

R. Douglas Powers, Associate Professor; A.B., SUNY; Ph.D., 

Syracuse University 

Eric G. Strauss, Research Professor; B.S., Emerson College; Ph.D., 

Tufts University 

Laura Hake, Assistant Professor; B.A, University of Tennessee; 

Ph.D., Tufts University 

Junona F. Moroianu, Assistant Professor; B.S., Ion Creanga 

University; M.S., University of Bucharest; Ph.D., Rockefeller 

University 

Janet Paluh, Assistant Professor; B.S./M.S., Ph.D., Purdue 

University; Ph.D., Stanford University; Post-Doc, University of 

California at Berkeley 

Robert J. Wolff, Senior Lecturer; B.A., Lafayette College; Ph.D. 

Tufts University 

Departmental Notes 

Important changes and additions to the biology program since 
the printing of the academic catalog are posted at the announcements 
section of the department web pages located at www.bc.edu/biology. 
Students are encouraged to check this site frequently as it contains the 
most accurate and up-to-date information available. 

• Graduate Program Director: Prof Daniel Kirschner, 
kirschnd@bc.edu 

• Undergraduate Program Director: Prof William Petri, 
petri@bc.edu 



• Department Administrator: Dr. Richard Monheimer, 
monheimr@bc.edu 

• Director of Laboratories: Dr. Mariana Tran, 
mariana@bc.edu 

• Assistant Director of Laboratories: Ms. Melanie 
Kutschke, kutschke@bc.edu 

• Technology Coordinator: Mr. Christopher Lavallee, 
tc.biology@bc.edu 

• Procurement Specialist: Ms. Leah Schneider 

• Office Coordinator: Ms. Jenny Williamson 

• Department Telephone: 617-552-3540 

• Department Internet Website: http://www.bc.edu/biology 

Undergraduate Program Description — B.A. and B.S. 
Degrees 

Beginning in the fall of 2002, the department will offer both 
Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degree programs in biolo- 
gy. The B.S. program is well-suited for biology majors who are inter- 
ested in pursuing those aspects of the field that require a strong back- 
ground knowledge in physics, chemistry, and mathematics and for 
students who want to fulfill premedical/predental requirements as 
part of their biology major. Normally, those interested in the areas of 
molecular biology, biochemistry, biophysics, physiology, neurobiol- 
ogy or cellular biology should pursue this degree. 

The new B.A. degree program also has a solid foundation in 
biology as its base, but creates room in a students schedule for addi- 
tion biology and relevant non-biology electives by removing the spe- 
cific requirement for organic chemistry and calculus-based physics 
that characterizes the B.S. program. Under the B.A. rubric, majors 
have more flexibility in choosing both additional science and math- 
ematics courses, as well as more opportunity to broaden their edu- 
cational experience. The B.A. program can better serve biology 
majors interested in integrating their study of biology with other, 
related areas including law, ethics, history, sociology, computer sci- 
ence, and management. 

Students should note that unlike the B.S. program, the B.A. 
program does not automatically fulfill medical school admission 
requirements without additional course work in chemistry, physics 
and mathematics. Contact the Premedical Office for details. 

The study of biology under either program offers students an 
exciting opportunity to study life from many viewpoints: from the 
molecular biology and biochemistry of cells to genetic, developmen- 
tal, and neurological aspects of organisms; from the structure, func- 
tion, and physiology of cells, organs and individuals to the interac- 
tion of organisms with each other and the environment. The goal of 
the program is for students to attain knowledge and understanding 
of the underlying principles of biological science and to be able to 
make what is learned practical through laboratory experience. For 
this reason, the major requires participation in several laboratory 
courses and the department strongly encourages its students to par- 
ticipate in a wide variety of advanced research experiences. Students 
with standard high school preparation in biology (a single, year-long 
general biology course with lab) should follow the regular programs 
for biology majors described below. Students with stronger prepara- 
tion (AP biology courses with lab) and who have achieved a score of 
5 on the AP Exam should consider following the Advanced 
Placement Program. Students in doubt concerning the most appro- 
priate program are encouraged to seek advice from a Biology depart- 
ment advisor during freshman orientation or at other times through 
the Biology office. 

Biology encompasses a huge field of inquiry that contains 
many sub-disciplines. At Boston College, biology majors may con- 



The Boston College Catalog 2002-2003 



51 



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centrate their study in one primary area by clioosing their bio-elec- 
tives and research courses to follow one of several programs includ- 
ing, for example, molecular biology and biochemistry, cellular and 
developmental biology, neuroscience, or environmental and popula- 
tion biology. More information on these programs may be obtained 
from the biology web site. Those interested in specifically emphasiz- 
ing the field of biochemistry in their studies can do so either as a 
concentration within the biology B.S. major or consider the alterna- 
tive interdepartmental biochemistry major described in its own sec- 
tion of the Boston College Academic Catalog. 

The biology major provides an excellent foundation for 
advanced study at the graduate level, for a wide array of career 
opportunities, and for further training in many areas. These include 
medicine, biomedical sciences and other health-related professions, 
biotechnology, environmental science, law, biomedical ethics, edu- 
cation, journalism, and public health. 

Requirements for Majors in the Regular Bachelor of Science 
(B.S.) Program 

Introductory Biology (BI 200 & Bl 202) 

Molecular Cell Biology (BI 304) and Genetics (BI 305) 

• Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory (BI 310) and Genetics 
Laboratory (BI 311) 

• Five upper division electives in biology (level 400 & 500) 
(taken from at least two of the three categories of bio-elective 
courses) 

• Two additional laboratory credits (level 300 or higher) 

• Eight co-requisite courses in math, chemistry, and physics list- 
ed below 

Biology majors are advised to enroll in BI 200-202 in their 
freshman year and in BI 304-305 and BI 3 1 0-3 1 1 in their sophomore 
year. This schedule allows majors to take maximum advantage of the 
opportunities for undergraduate research that are available to juniors 
and seniors, and to have maximum flexibility in choosing upper-divi- 
sion electives. For these reasons, majors are given preference in enroll- 
ment in the foundation courses if seating becomes limited. 

The five upper-division elective courses in biology must be 
exclusive of seminars and tutorials and they must be chosen from at 
least two of the three categories of biology electives. Categories are 
listed below. Typically, undergraduate research courses (BI 461-467), 
(BI 399), (BI 490), and graduate courses at the 600 level or higher 
do not count as upper division bio-electives. However, in certain 
limited cases — ^with the recommendation of the faculty advisor and 
the approval of the Chairperson — two or more semesters of under- 
graduate research may be allowed to substitute for one upper-divi- 
sion elective. The requirement for two additional laboratory credits 
(level 300 or higher) may be satisfied by taking two 1 -credit labora- 
tory courses (or equivalents) or by taking one laboratory course 
worth two or more credits. With departmental permission, one 
semester of undergraduate research in Biology (BI 461-467) can be 
substituted for 2 lab credits. Also, some combined lecture-lab cours- 
es count as the equivalent of a 1 -credit lab for the purposes of this 
requirement. Courses that satisfy 1 or 2 credits of this requirement 
have this fact noted in their catalog descriptions. Students are cau- 
tioned to note that courses are not allowed to be co-counted for both 
elective and lab requirements. Note that students must take at least 
three semesters of undergraduate research in Biology (BI 461-467) 
to use these courses to satisfy both 2 lab credits and as a substitute 
for one bio-elective. Students should consult the biology announce- 
ments section of our website for updates on this point. An updated 
list of courses satisfying the lab requirement is available in the biol- 
ogy office and on our website. 



Requirements for Majors in the Advanced Placement Bachelor of 
Science (B.S.) Program 

Students with strong high school preparation in biology (AP 
biology courses with lab) and who have achieved a score of 5 on the 
AP Exam are encouraged to follow the advanced placement pro- 
gram. This program allows students to enroll as freshmen in the BI 
304-305 Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics course and the BI 
310-311 laboratory and replaces the BI 200-202 Introductory 
Biology course credits with two additional upper division bio-elec- 
tives. Advantages of the program are that students more quickly 
advance to a level where they can select from the more focused upper 
division biology courses. In order to ensure a reasonable breadth in 
biology training for students who choose the advanced placement 
program, they are required to take at least one of their seven bio-elec- 
tives from each of the three categories of bio-elective courses. 
Generally, with regard to other aspects of the biology majors pro- 
gram, advanced placement students follow the same rules as students 
in the regular program (see details above) . 

Summary of specific course requirements for advanced place- 
ment students: 

Molecular Cell Biology (BI 304) and Genetics (BI 305) 

• Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory (BI 310) and Genetics 
Laboratory (BI 311) 

• Seven upper division biology electives (level 400 & 500) 
(taken from all three bio-elective course categories) 

• Two additional laboratory credits (level 300 or higher) 

• Eight co-requisite courses in math, chemistry, and physics list- 
ed below 

Corequisites for the Bachelor of Science Degree 
One year each of the following: 

General Chemistry and lab (CH 109-110,111-112)* 
Organic Chemistry and lab (CH 231-232, 233-234)* 
Physics (calculus based) and lab (PH 211-212, 203-204)* 

• Calculus (MT 100-101) or, if supported by AP exam or math 
department recommendation, Calculus/Biostatistics (MT 101 
& BI 230)* 

*Courses routinely used to fulfill these co-requisites are indi- 
cated in parentheses. However, some higher level courses and alter- 
natives are acceptable. Students interested in these alternatives 
should consult the departmental website, publications and advisors. 
Requirements for Majors in the Regular Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) 
Program 

Introductory Biology (BI 200 & BI 202) 

Molecular Cell Biology (BI 304) and Genetics (BI 305) 

• Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory (BI 310) and Genetics 
Laboratory (BI 311) 

• Three upper division biology electives (level 400 & 500) 
(taken from at least two of the three categories of bio-elective 
courses) 

• Three B.A. electives (from list of approved courses on website) 

• Two additional laboratory credits (level 300 or higher) 

• Three co-requisite courses and labs in math and chemistry 
(see list below) 

Requirements for Majors in the Advanced Placement Bachelor 
Arts (B.A.) Program 

Molecular Cell Biology (BI 304) and Genetics (BI 305) 

• Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory (BI 310) and Genetics 
Laboratory (BI 311) 

• Five upper division biology electives (level 400 & 500) (taken 
from all three bio-elective course categories) 

• Three B.A. electives (from list of approved courses on website) 

• Two additional laboratory credits (level 300 or higher) 



52 



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• Three co-requisite courses and labs in math and chemistry 

(see list below) 
Corequisites for the Bachelor of Arts Degree 

One year of chemistry and at least one semester of math. 

General Chemistry and lab (CH 109-110, 111-112)* 

Calculus (MT 100 or 101) or Biostatistics (BI 230)* 
*Courses routinely used to fulfill these co-requisites are indi- 
cated in parentheses. However, some higher level courses and alter- 
natives are acceptable. Students interested in these alternatives 
should consult the departmental website, publications and advisors. 
Students who are interested in majoring in biology and who 
have a need for alternatives in course scheduling or sequencing 
should consult a biology department advisor as early in their studies 
as possible. For freshmen, this consultation should preferably take 
place at orientation before registration. Students needing special 
help in replacing discontinued courses should contact the depart- 
ment offices at 617-552-3540. 

Those interested in emphasizing the field of biochemistry in 
their studies can do so within the biology major or in addition, con- 
sider the alternative interdepartmental biochemistry major. 

Biology Upper Division Elective Course Categories 

Regular B.S. Program majors need five courses with at least one 
from each of two different categories. Advanced Placement B.S. 
majors need seven courses with at least one from each of all three cat- 
egories. Regular B.A. Program majors need three courses from at 
least two categories. Advanced Placement B.A. Program majors need 
five courses from all three categories. 
Molecular Biology, Genetics, and Biochemistry 

BI 435 Biochemistry (Biological Chemistry) 

BI 440 Molecular Biology 

BI 454 Literature of Biochemistry 

BI 480 Biochemistry Lab 

BI 506 Recombinant DNA Technology 

BI 507 Computational Biology 

BI 515 Biophysical Chemistry 

BI 533 Cellular Transport and Disease 

BI 535 Structural Biochemistry 

BI 541 Molecular Immunobiology 

BI 557 Neurochemical Genetics 

BI 570 Biology of the Nucleus 

BI 580 Molecular Biology Lab 
Cellular, Developmental, and Organismal Biology 

BI 409 Virology 

BI 412 Bacteriology 

BI 425 Stem cells. Cloning & Human Development 

BI 430 Functional Histology 

BI 438 Biology of the Cell Cycle 

BI 481 Introduction to Neuroscience 

BI 509 Vertebrate Cell Biology 

BI 510 General Endocrinology 

BI 540 Immunology 

BI 548 Comparative Animal Physiology 

BI 554 Mammalian Physiology 

BI 556 Developmental Biology 

BI 562 Neurophysiology 
Population and Environmental Biology 

BI 401 Environmental Biology 

BI 442 Principles of Ecology 

BI 443 Coastal Field Ecology 

BI 445 Animal Behavior 

BI 446 Marine Biology 



• BI 449 Methods in Environmental Field Research 

• BI 458 Evolution 
Information for First Year Majors 

The normal course load for first term biology B.S. and B.A. 
majors is BI 200 Introductory Biology, CH 109 General Chemistry 
with laboratory, and MT 100 or with permission MT 101 Calculus. 
BI 200 is an introduction to living systems at the molecular, cellular, 
organismal, and population levels. It is required for regular biology 
and biochemistry majors and open to others unless seating becomes 
limited in which case biology majors will be given preference. 

First term Advanced Placement biology B.S. and B.A. majors 
should enroll directly into BI 304 Molecular Cell Biology and the 
co-requisite BI 310 laboratory as well as in CH 109 General 
Chemistry with laboratory or CH 117 Principles of Modern 
Chemistry with laboratory, and MT 100 or MT 101 Calculus or 
equivalent courses. 
Information for Non-Majors 

Non-majors seeking a year-long course in general biology 
should normally enroll in BI 100-102 Survey of Biology. Pre-health 
(premedical, pre-dental, pre-veterinary) students should take BI 
200-202, Introductory Biology. Those students needing a year-long 
biology laboratory can enroll in BI 210-211, General Biology 
Laboratory. In addition, pre-health students who are not majoring in 
biology should obtain a Premedical Advising Packet from the 
Premedical Office. 
Information for Study Abroad 

Students in the advanced placement B.S. program, requiring 7 
upper division bio-electives, may apply for approval to take the fol- 
lowing major courses abroad: One upper division bio-elective equiv- 
alent per semester abroad up to a maximum of 2 substitutions (but 
note no other substitutions for the remaining 5 required bio-elective 
courses will be allowed); Physics with laboratory — calculus based 
(equivalent to PH 21 1/203 and/or PH 212/204 or higher); Calculus 
(equivalent to MT 100 and/or MT 101 or higher) 

Students in the standard biology B.A. program, may apply for 
approval to take the following major courses abroad: One B.A.-elec- 
tive equivalent; Calculus equivalent to (MT 100 and/or MT 1 1 or 
higher), or Biostatistics. 

Students in the advanced placement biology B.A. program, 
may apply for approval to take the following major courses abroad: 
One B.A. -elective equivalent course or one bio-elective equivalent 
during the first semester abroad; Calculus equivalent to (MT 100 
and/or MT 101 or higher), or Biostatistics Students studying abroad 
for two semesters, may obtain approval to take one B.A. elective 
equivalent and one bio-elective equivalent course abroad. 

Specifically approved Boston College courses for the purpose of 
satisfying the upper division bio-elective requirement are those num- 
bered BI 400 through BI 599, excluding Undergraduate Research (BI 
461 through 467), Tutorials (BI 490), and Advanced Independent 
Research (BI 399). In order to be considered as a possible substitute 
for a bio-elective, a course must be a second level course; that is, it 
must have published biology pre-requisites and not be at an intro- 
ductory level or appropriate for students with no prior college level 
courses in biology. Students applying to take only one semester of 
physics abroad must present evidence that the semester abroad will 
properly complement the semester taken at Boston College to form a 
comprehensive year long calculus-based physics course. 

Students must meet with William Petri, Associate 
Chairperson, or another designated advisor for study abroad advis- 
ing and course approval. In order to obtain the required prior 
approval for international courses, students need to fill out a Course 



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Arts and Sciences 



Approval Form and submit it to the biology department along with 
a copy of the catalog description for each proposed international 
course. The description should indicate the course level, intended 
audience and pre-requisites. Such application should be made well 
in advance and no later than the semester before leaving to study 
abroad to insure that the course can be reviewed, its course category 
determined and adjustments made if needed. The approval process 
can take several days to weeks (even longer over the summer), so stu- 
dents should plan ahead. 
Research Opportunities for Undergraduates 

Research is a fundamental aspect of university science study 
and the biology department encourages interested majors to take 
advantage of the many undergraduate research programs that are 
available. There are a variety of research programs that can begin as 
early as the freshman year. Opportunities with a range of commit- 
ment levels are available, from single-semester courses to projects 
involving four semesters or more. Usually, students are advised to 
spend at least two (2) semesters on a research project. 

Undergraduate Research: BI 461-462 is typically a six-credit, 
two-semester commitment where students work on ongoing 
research projects in laboratories with other students under faculty 
guidance. Projects can be extended for a second year under 
Advanced Undergraduate Research (BI 465-467) and enriched by 
the addition of the Tutorial in Biology (BI 490). 

Advanced Independent Research: BI 399 is a 9- to 12-credit 
commitment over two semesters. This highly competitive program, 
which requires the Dean's approval, is designed for ambitious and 
talented undergraduates who are interested in devoting a major por- 
tion of their senior year to scholarly, state-of-the-art research of a 
quality that can lead to publication. Students design, develop, and 
research their own projects with close faculty supervision. 
Completion of a written research thesis is required. Applicants are 
expected to have some prior research experience before applying to 
the program. In most instances, applicants will have taken BI 461 
and/or BI 462 or an equivalent in their junior year. 

Undergraduate research projects may involve almost any area 
of biology. Currently, major faculty research work centers in the 
fields of cellular and molecular biology, neurobiology and physiolo- 
gy, developmental biology and gene expression, biochemistry, and 
immunology. For a description of specific areas of faculty research, 
see the faculty section of the department website. For information 
on the above research courses, contact your faculty advisor or the 
department office. 
Biochemistry Major 

Refer to the Biochemistry, section for a description of this 
interdisciplinary major. Students with questions should contact Dr. 
Annunziato or the biology department office. 

Graduate Program Description 

The biology department offers courses leading to the degrees of 
Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science. The Master of Science 
in Teaching (M.S.T) degree is administered through the Lynch School 
Graduate Programs in cooperation with the Biology department. 

Those seeking admission to the graduate program should have 
a strong background in biology, chemistry, and mathematics with 
grades of B or better in these subjects. Deficiencies in preparation as 
noted by the Admissions Committee may be made up in the gradu- 
ate school. 

The Ph.D. program does not require a specific number of grad- 
uate credits; however, the Residence Requirements, as defined by the 
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, must be met. The minimum 
curriculum for Ph.D. students consists of four core courses in genet- 



ics, biochemistry, molecular biology, and cell biology (BI 611, BI 
612, BI 614, BI 615); two additional graduate level (500 or higher) 
biology courses; and three graduate seminars (800 or higher); and a 
course in the responsible conduct of research. Ph.D. students are 
required to do three 10-week research rotations in their first year in 
the program. In addition, to advance to candidacy for the doctoral 
degree, students must pass a Comprehensive Examination and 
defend a research proposal during their second year. 

For the Master's degree, a minimum of 30 graduate credits is 
required. This must include the four core courses (see above); two 
additional graduate level biology courses (500 or higher); one seminar 
course (BI 800 or higher); and a course in the responsible conduct of 
research. Two 1 0-week research rotations are also required. 

Both M.S. and Ph.D. students are expected to attend depart- 
mental coUoquia (usually Tuesday afternoons). Both degrees require 
the presentation and oral defense of a thesis based on original 
research conducted under the guidance of a biology department fac- 
ulty member. 

M.S. and Ph.D. students are also expected to participate in 
teaching undergraduate courses during their course of studies. 

For the M.S.T. degree, course requirements vary depending 
upon the candidate's prior teaching experience; however, all Master's 
programs leading to certification in secondary education include 
practical experiences in addition to course work. Students seeking 
certification in Massachusetts are required to pass the Massachusetts 
Educators Certification Test. For further information on the M.S.T, 
please refer to the Lynch School Graduate Programs section entitled, 
"Master's Programs in Secondary Teaching," or call the Office of 
Graduate Admissions, LSOE, at 617-552-4214. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
BI 100 Survey of Biology I (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

Offered without a laboratory, this course is intended to investi- 
gate fundamental issues in biology and is targeted at the non-biolo- 
gy major. The course is offered in two parts, although they may be 
taken in reverse order, if necessary. The fall semester focuses on the 
nature of scientific investigation, the origins of life, biomolecules, 
cell structure, and molecular genetics. Evolutionary processes and 
the effects of environmental change on living systems are stressed 
throughout the course. 
Eric Strauss 
Silvard Kool 

BI 102 Survey of Biology II (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

This course is a continuation of BI 100. The spring semester top- 
ics focus on biology at the organismal and population level. Topics 
include population genetics, evolution of new species, extinction, neu- 
rophysiology, behavior, conservation biology and human evolution. 
Eric Strauss 
The Department 

BI 130 Anatomy and Physiology I (Fall: 3) 
Corequisite: BI 131 
Does NOT satisfy the Natural Sciences Core requirement 

An intensive introductory course designed to bring out the cor- 
relations between the structures and functions of the various body 
systems. Each system discussed is treated from microscopic to 
macroscopic levels of organization. This course is primarily intend- 



54 



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ed to prepare nursing students for their clinical career. Students out- 
side the School of Nursing should consult with the Department of 
Biology. 
Carol Halpern 

BI 131 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I (Fall: 1) 
Required of Nursing students taking BI 130. 
Lab fee required 

Laboratory exercises intended to familiarize students with the 
various structures and principles discussed in BI 130 through the use 
of anatomical models, physiological experiments and limited dissec- 
tion. One two-hour laboratory period per week. 
Carol Halpern 

BI 132 Anatomy and Physiology II (Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: BI 133 
Does NOT satisfy the Natural Sciences Core requirement 

A continuation of BI 130. 
Carol Halpern 

BI 133 Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II (Spring: 1) 
Lab fee required 

A continuation of BI 131. 
Carol Halpern 

BI 134 Human Physiology I (Fall: 3) 
Does NOT satisfy the Natural Sciences Core requirement 

A lecture course that focuses on the correlations between the 
structure and functions of the various systems of the human body. 
Each system is treated from the microscopic to the macroscopic lev- 
els of organization. This course is not intended for students in the 
School of Nursing. 
Carol Halpern 
BI 135 Human Physiology II (Spring: 3) 

A continuation of BI 134. 
Carol Halpern 

BI 161 Nature in American Culture (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with EN 263 
Does NOT satisfy the Natural Sciences Core requirement 

Explores cultural attitudes toward the natural world through- 
out American history. Critical review of a range of texts across a vari- 
ety of disciplines, from the religious to the political, from the scien- 
tific to the poetic, from the legal to the personal, and from the his- 
toric to the philosophic. 
Charles Lord 
Maxwell Kennedy 

BI 163 Understanding Urban Ecosystems: Environmental Law, 
Policy and Science (Spring: 3) 
Does NOT satisfy the Natural Sciences Core requirement 

This course will explore the scientific and legal elements of the 
protection and restoration of urban environmental resources, with a 
focus on Massachusetts. Specifically, the course will cover the basic 
ecology, legal and social history, and legal and political frameworks for 
the following topics: Urban Habitat and Wildlife; Toxic Pollution in 
Cities; Urban Watersheds; Urban Air Quality and Public Health; The 
City as Biological Habitat: Human Behavior and the Urban Setting. 
Charles Lord 

BI 200 Introductory Biology I (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisite: CH 109 or equivalent or permission of department 
Corequisite: CH 109 or equivalent or permission of department 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

An introduction to living systems at the molecular, cellular, organ- 
ismal and population levels of organization. Required for standard pro- 
gram biology and biochemistry majors who are normally expected to 



take CH 109 concurrently. Biology and biochemistry majors are 

advised to enroll in the required BI 310-BI 311 Molecular Cell Biology 

and Genetics lab series in their sophomore year. Other majors desiring 

a general biology lab course are advised to enroll in the BI 210-21 1 lab 

series which is not required for majors. Variations from this scheduling 

pattern are possible, but require departmental approval. 

Carol Halpern 

The Department 

BI 202 Introductory Biology II (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: CH 1 1 or equivalent and permission of department 

Corequisite: CH 110 or equivalent and permission of department 

Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

A continuation of BI 200. 
David A. Krauss 
Robert R. Woljf 

BI 209 Environmental Biology (Fall: 3) 
Does NOT satisfy the Natural Sciences Core requirement 

A consideration of the complex and intricate interactions between 
the living and non-living environment and how each of us plays a part 
in a fragile and increasingly fragmented natural world. Energy flow, 
biogeochemical cycles, evolution (e.g., natural selection and genetic 
drift) and current environmental issues (such as ozone holes, acid rain, 
human population growth, and environmental toxins) will be dis- 
cussed. Guest speakers and two to three field trips are included. 
Judy Chupasko 

BI 210 General Biology Laboratory I (Fall: 1) 
Prerequisite: One semester of college-level biology. 
This course does not satisfy departmental requirements for biology 
majors. 
Lab fee required 

The first semester of a two-semester introductory biology lab- 
oratory for non-biology majors. This course emphasizes construct- 
ing hypotheses, designing experiments, interpreting data, and pre- 
senting experimental results. Students will receive a practical intro- 
duction to the experimental approaches used in three foundation 
areas of biology; biochemistry and cell biology, physiology and organ 
systems, and ecology and field biology. 
Mariana Tran 

BI 21 1 General Biology Laboratory II (Spring: 1) 
Lab fee required 

The continuation of BI 210. 
Mariana Tran 

BI 214 Capstone Science and Religion: Contemporary Issues 
(Fall: 3) 

Cross listed with UN 521 
Restricted to seniors and second semester juniors. 

This course will explore the interaction between religion and 
science from early modern times (Galileo and Newton) to the pre- 
sent (Hawking, Peacocke, Teilhard de Chardin). The origin of the 
universe and the origin and evolution of life on earth will be 
explored. The influence of contemporary physics and biology on the 
believer's understanding of God's interaction with the world will be 
considered. Some knowledge of science, particularly familiarity with 
some basic concepts of physics, will be assumed. 
Donald ]. Plocke, S.J. 
BI 220 Microbiology (Fall: 2) 
Prerequisites: BI 130-132 
Does NOT satisfy the Natural Sciences Core requirement 

This course is a study of the basic physiological and biochemi- 
cal activities of microorganisms, effective methods of destruction, 



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mechanisms of drug action on microorganisms, and the application 

of serological and immunological principles. Intended primarily for 

nursing students. 

Elinor M. O'Brien 

BI 221 Microbiology Laboratory (Fall: 1) 

Lab fee required 

One two-hour laboratory period per week. To be taken in con- 
junction with BI 220. 
Elinor M O'Brien. 

BI 224 Health and Science Education Disparities (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: One course in biology 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core requirement 
Does NOT satisfy the Natural Sciences Core requirement 
This course is limited to 20 students. 

This is a policy course on the current status of African 
Americans, Chicanos/Latinos and Native Americans in science. 
Topics such as health disparities, disparities in science education, 
Indigenous Peoples health, and the genome project will be discussed. 
The roles of historically Black colleges and universities, Hispanic 
serving universities and tribal colleges in addressing these topics will 
be covered. 
David Burgess 

BI 230 Biostatistics (Fall: 3) 

Does NOT satisfy the Natural Sciences Core requirement 

This course will introduce biology students to the basic statis- 
tical techniques that are used in conducting biological and medical 
research. The course is divided into four parts: (1) descriptive statis- 
tics (averages, variability); (2) probability and probability distribu- 
tions (basic probability theory and the binomial, poisson, and nor- 
mal distributions); (3) statistical inference (parametric and non- 
parametric tests); and, (4) relationships between variables (simple 
and multiple regression). 
Richard A. McGowen, S.J. 
BI 304 Molecular Cell Biology (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: BI 200-202 or permission of department 
Corequisite: BI 310 

This course, focusing on molecular cell biology, is designed to 
give students a foundation in the molecular biology of the cell and 
in genetics beyond the level offered in first year courses in biology. It 
serves as excellent preparation for more advanced courses in cell biol- 
ogy, molecular biology and genetics. The fall semester covers cell and 
molecular biology. The spring semester introduces students to 
microbial and eucaryotic genetics. The course and the accompany- 
ing laboratory (BI 310) are required for majors and recommended 
for premedical students. 
Kathleen Dunn 
Junona Moroianu 
The Department 

BI 305 Molecular Cell Biology (Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: BI 3 1 1 

This course, which focuses primarily on genetics, is a continu- 
ation of BI 304. 
Charles S. Hoffman 
Clare O'Connor 

BI 310 Molectdar Cell Biology Laboratory (Fall: 1) 
Corequisite: BI 304 
Lab meets once a week. 
Lab fee required 

A laboratory course designed to accompany BI 304 and to 
introduce students to basic techniques in cell biology, molecular 
biology, and genetics. Included are exercises in sterile technique, bac- 



terial culture, bacterial transformation, DNA isolation and analysis, 
restriction enzyme mapping, DNA amplification, protein character- 
ization, and genetic analysis. 
Mariana Tran 

BI 311 Molecular Cell Biology Laboratory (Spring: 1) 
Prerequisite: BI 310 
Corequisite: BI 305 
Lab meets once a week. 
Lab fee required 

A laboratory course designed to accompany BI 305. The course 
is the continuation of BI 310 and includes basic techniques in mol- 
ecular biology and genetics. 
Mariana Tran 

BI 370 Computational Foundations of Bioinformatics (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: MT 100, MT 101 

With departmental approval, this course may be taken for gradu- 
ate credit. 

This course is not open to students who have taken MC 140 and 
MC 141, or equivalent. 

This course provides foundations in mathematics and comput- 
er science for biologists. Intended audience consists of students plan- 
ning later to take Computational Biology BI 507, or who would like 
a rapid, comprehensive introduction to the main concepts of pro- 
gramming, data structures, probability, and statistics used in compu- 
tational areas of biology, neurobiology, and especially bioinformatics. 
Currently planned languages are Mathematica and the object orient- 
ed scription language Python. 
Peter Clote 

BI 390 Environmental Scholar I (Fall: 3) 
Departmental permission required 

By application only; applications available in the Environmental 
Studies program office. 
This course does NOT count as a bio-elective for biology majors. 

A research and internship program with the Environmental 
Studies Program and the Watershed Institute at Boston College. 
Year-long projects measure the impacts of human development on 
urban and suburban ecosystems. Scholars are divided into three 
teams focusing on field biology, environmental education, and envi- 
ronmental policy. Environmental Scholars participate in the pro- 
gram 10 hours per week and complete a final project each semester 
for review by the team's faculty mentor. The Scholars also participate 
in monthly Scholars Workshops and weekly team meetings. 
Eric Strauss 

BI 391 Environmental Scholars II (Spring: 3) 
Departmental permission required 
This course does NOT count as a bio-elective for biology majors. 

The continuation of BI 390 
Eric Strauss 

BI 399 Advanced Independent Research (Fall/Spring: 6) 
Formerly known as Scholar of the College 

See the College of Arts and Sciences section of this Catalog. This 
course can count as a maximum of one upper-division elective if no 
other elective credit has been claimed for other research courses. 
The Department 

BI 401 Environmental Biology (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: BI 200-202 

A consideration of the complex and intricate interactions between 
the living and non-living environment and how each of us plays a part 
in a fragile and increasingly fragmented natural world. Energy flow, bio- 



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geochemical cycles, evolution (e.g., natural selection and genetic drift) 

and current environmental issues (such as ozone holes, acid rain, human 

population growth, and environmental toxins) will be discussed. 

Judy Chupasko 

BI 409 Virology (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 200-BI 202 or permission of the instructor 

This course will consider viruses that are important in human 
infectious disease. Viruses to be examined include Influenza, cancer 
related viruses such as the Epstein Barr Virus and the human pappi- 
loma virus, HIV, and the "emerging" viruses such as Ebola and the 
hantaviruses. The role of vaccination in eliminating small pox and its 
implication in human infections with a related monkey pox virus 
will also be discussed. The molecular biology of virus life cycles and 
issues related to epidemiology and etiology will be considered in the 
context of infectious disease. 
Kathleen Dunn 

BI 410 Cell Culture Laboratory (Spring: 1) 
Prerequisites: BI 304-305; BI 308 or BI 310-311 
Lab fee required. 

This course can satisfy one credit of the major requirement for 
additional laboratory credits. 

This course will focus on teaching basic tissue culture and 
immunohistochemical techniques for growing and identifying cells 
from mammalian tissue. Students will dissociate and culture cortical 
neurons using sterile techniques. Growth of the neurons and their 
newly formed processes will be observed and documented. Antibody 
labeling and various other techniques will be used to distinguish dif- 
ferent classes of growing cells, for example, inhibitory neurons or glial 
cells. This laboratory meets once a week for two hours. 
Ann Yee 

BI 412 Bacteriology (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: BI 200-202, CH 231 taken concurrently or previously 

A study of microorganisms as examples of independent cellular 
life forms, as agents of disease, and as contributors to our environ- 
ment. Topics covered will include the following: microbial growth, 
the control of microorganisms, antimicrobial chemotherapy, the 
nature of viruses, recombination and plasmids, the immune 
response, and microbial diseases of humans. 
The Department 

BI 413 Bacteriology Laboratory (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Corequisite: BI 412 
Lab fee required 

Exercises in this laboratory course deal with aseptic techniques, 
microbial cultivation and growth characteristics, staining and bacte- 
rial isolation techniques, differential biochemical tests, identification 
of unknown bacterial species, and testing effectiveness of antimicro- 
bial agents. 
Kathleen Dunn 

BI 425 Stem Cells, Cloning and Human Development (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: BI 304, BI 305 

This course will examine some important questions in human 
reproduction and embryology beginning with gametogenesis, fertil- 
ization and early development. Having acquired a basic understand- 
ing of gene regulation, pattern formation, morphogenesis and tissue 
polarity, students will study the in vitro manipulation of mammalian 
embryos, cloning and embryonic stem cells. The ethical, legal, sci- 
entific and technological questions that arise will be investigated. 
R. Douglas Powers 



BI 430 Functional Histology (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 200, BI 202 and BI 304 

This course can satisfy the major requirement for EITHER an 

upper division biology elective OR one laboratory credit, but 

NOT BOTH. 

This course investigates the microscopic structure of all the tis- 
sues and organs of the body as discernible through the light micro- 
scope. Special emphasis will be placed on learning how the structure 
of a tissue or organ reflects its function and its possible clinical sig- 
nificance. There will be two one-hour lectures and one three-hour 
lab each week. 
Ann G. Yee 

BI 435 Biological Chemistry (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: BI 200, CH 231 or permission of the instructor 

This course is designed to introduce biology and biochemistry 
majors to the subject with an emphasis on understanding how a 
knowledge of biochemical principals is useful to those engaged in 
biological research at the molecular, cellular, and organismal levels. 
The material includes the following: (1) the properties, synthesis, 
and metabolic activities of carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, 
lipids, and nucleic acids and (2) how the biochemical processes meet 
the energy, biosynthetic, and nutritional requirements of the cell. 
Reference will be made to alterations in these processes in specific 
diseases. Students interested in enrolling in a biochemistry laborato- 
ry course should see BI 480. 
Daniel A. Kirschner 

BI 440 Molecular Biology (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: BI 304, CH 231-232 

An intermediate level course in molecular biology with empha- 
sis on the relationship between three-dimensional structure and 
function of proteins and nucleic acids. Topics will include the fol- 
lowing: physical methods for the study of macromolecules; protein 
folding motifs and mechanisms of folding; molecular recognition; 
DNA topology, replication, repair and recombination; RNA synthe- 
sis and processing; genetic code and translation; and molecular 
mechanisms for regulation of gene expression. (This course, togeth- 
er with BI 435, satisfies the requirement of a year of basic biochem- 
istry for the biochemistry major.) 
The Department 

BI 442 Principles of Ecology (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 200-202 or equivalent, or permission of instructor 
This course includes readings in and discussions of principles 
and concepts of modern ecological theory. Ecological relationships 
will be studied at the individual, population, community, and 
ecosystem levels. Evolution will be a common theme throughout the 
course. Past topics have included mathematical models of popula- 
tion growth, behavioral ecology, predator-prey interactions, energy 
and productivity, and nutrient cycling. If time permits, environ- 
mental aspects of ecology will be covered at the end of the course. 
There will be two required field trips. A limited number of places 
will be reserved for non-biology majors who have appropriate back- 
ground experience. 
Robert]. Wolff 

BI 443 Coastal Field Ecology (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 100-102 or BI 110-112 or BI 200-202 or permis- 
sion of instructor 

This course discusses the ontogeny and natural history of bar- 
rier beach systems in New England. Course topics include abiotic 
factors such as tides and climate, floral and faunal biodiversity and 
ecology, as well as the conservation of rare ecosystems. Much of the 
course focuses on projects at the Sandy Neck barrier beach study site 



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on Cape Cod. This course is a suggested prerequisite for students 
wishing to take Methods in Environmental Research (BI 449). 
Students interested in participating in field investigation at Sandy 
Neck should enroll in the one credit course BI 448 Ecological Field 
Laboratory after speaking with the instructor. 
Peter Auger 

BI 445 Animal Behavior (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of an introductory Biology or permission of 
the instructor 

This course will investigate the evolution, development, and 
adaptive significance of the observed behavior of animals across a 
broad taxonomic distribution. The course will be structured around 
major theoretical and research topics in the field including commu- 
nication, social behavior, reproductive strategies, territoriality, animal 
cognition, and the role of behavioral studies in the management of 
endangered species. The class meets twice per week, once each for a 
2.5 hour lecture section and a one hour mandatory discussion group. 
One weekend field trip to the Cape Cod fieldstation is planned and 
optional field activities are available for interested students. 
Eric Strauss 

BI 446 Marine Biology (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 200-BI 202 or permission of instructor 
Course requirements include three field trips. 

After a brief consideration of the history of oceanography, stu- 
dents are familiarized with the various subdivisions of the marine sys- 
tems. Subsequently, the different phyla of marine organisms are dis- 
cussed in a systematic fashion, starting with unicellular life forms and 
ending with the marine mammals. Physical factors of the world's 
oceans, such as tides, global current patterns, and horizontal stratifi- 
cation are related to the marine trophic structure in its totality. Other 
topics include seafloor spreading and hydrothermal vents while spe- 
cial attention is given to ecologically important marine habitats, such 
as estuaries, mangrove and sea grass communities, and coral reefs. 
Silvard Kool 

BI 448 Ecological Field Laboratory (Fall: 1) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

This course provides students with the first-hand opportunity to 
visit, study, and otherwise experience the natural field conditions 
which are discussed in their Coastal Field Ecology course (BI 443), 
taken concurrently. A minimum of 1 5 hours will be spent in the field 
with a professional ecologist examining various components and con- 
ditions of the environment which make up natural coastal ecosystems. 
Peter Auger 

BI 449 Methods in Environmental Field Research (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: At least one course in Ecology, Coastal Science, or 
Animal Behavior and instructor's consent 
Two (2) credit lab fee required 

Intended for Juniors potentially interested in pursuing some 
type of organismal independent science project during their senior 
year. Methods used in environmental field ecology encompass areas 
associated with animal behavior, field biology and public health. 
Maximum 10 students. This course will satisfy two credits of the 
biology major laboratory requirement. 
Peter Auger 

BI 454 The Literature of Biochemistry (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Biochemistry, BI 435 or CH 561 

This seminar-type course focuses on current topics in biochem- 
istry and medical research. Topics include aging and telomerase, pri- 
ons (the infective agent of "Mad Cow Disease"), nitric oxide (a tiny 
molecule with an astonishing variety of hormone-like effects), mam- 
malian cloning, cancer and cell cycle regulation, the biochemistry of 



anthrax, and others. Original research papers from current literature 
are read and discussed. Rather than a comprehensive survey, the 
course provides depth in specific areas, enabling students to gain a 
refined understanding of the means and methods of experimental sci- 
ence as well as an appreciation for some of its latest products. 
Arlene Wyman 

BI 458 Evolution (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: BI 200-202 

This course examines the processes of evolution and the 
sequence of events that lead to the introduction of new forms of life, 
as corroborated by the fossil record. Specific topics include: the his- 
tory of the development of evolutionary theory; the development of 
methods for reconstructing evolutionary patterns; speciation; adap- 
tive radiation; population genetics; evolutionary convergence; mass 
extinction; biogeography; possible relationships between past and 
present-day organismal diversity; and the three major methods used 
for determining phylogenetic relationships among organisms. 
Silvard Kool 
David Krauss 

BI 459 Internship in Environmental Studies (Spring: 1) 
Eric Strauss 

BI 461 Undergraduate Research (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Chairperson 
Lab fee per semester required 

Students completing 2 semesters of Undergraduate Research with- 
in courses BI 461, 462, 465 and 466 can, with departmental approval, 
substitute these two semesters for one bio-elective. Alternatively, majors 
can use one of these undergraduate research courses to fUfiU two cred- 
its of the additional lab requirement. Three semesters of undergraduate 
research is needed for both a bio-elective substitution and the lab cred- 
its. Undergraduate students of advanced standing may participate in 
research projects in the laboratory of a faculty member. 
The Department 

BI 462 Undergraduate Research (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Permission of the Chairperson 
Lab fee per semester required 

Undergraduate students of advanced standing may participate 
in research projects in the laboratory of a faculty member. 
The Department 

BI A6i-AGA Research in Biochemistry (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Permission of the Chairperson 
Lab fee per semester required 

Undergraduate students of advanced standing may participate 
in research projects in the laboratory of a faculty member. 
The Department 

BI 465-466 Advanced Undergraduate Research I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Chairperson 
Lab fee per semester required 

Designed for students who have completed two semesters of 
undergraduate research under course numbers BI 461 through BI 
464 and who desire to continue independent research projects under 
the guidance of department faculty. 
The Department 



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BI 480 Biological Chemistry Laboratory (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisite: BI 435 or equivalent 

Corequisite: BI 435 or equivalent 

Lab fee required 

This course can satisfy the major requirement for EITHER an 

upper division biology elective OR for two laboratory credits, but 

NOT BOTH. 

This is an advanced-project laboratory for students interested 
in hands-on training in modern biochemical techniques under close 
faculty supervision in a new, dedicated laboratory designed for this 
purpose. In addition to formal lab training and discussion sections, 
students will have access to the lab outside of class hours to work on 
projects intended to produce publication-quality data. Ideal for stu- 
dents interested in solid grounding for and exposure to academic 
research in biochemistry. 
William Petri 

BI 481 Introduction to Neurosciences (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: One year of an introductory biology course, e.g., BI 200 

This course is intended to provide a comprehensive introduc- 
tion to the structure and function of the nervous system. We will 
adopt a multi-level approach and consider neural functioning at 
molecular, cellular and organismal levels. Topics covered will include 
the physiology of the neuron; the pharmacological and molecular 
bases of neurotransmission; the fundamentals of nervous system 
organization; and the neural basis of higher order processes such as 
sensory integration and perception, and memory and cognition. 
Grant Balkema 
BI 489 Internships in Biology (Fall/Spring: 1) 

This course provides an undergraduate Biology major, who has 
the permission of both the Dean and the Biology Department, to 
gain one elective credit for working in association with Biology fac- 
ulty as an off-campus intern. 
The Department 

BI 490 Tutorial in Biology (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and Chairperson 

This course is a directed study that includes assigned readings 
and discussions of various areas of the biological sciences. 
The Department 

Undergraduate and Graduate Course Offerings 
BI 506 Recombinant DNA Technology (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: BI 304-305 (or equivalent) or permission of the 
instructor 

This course will describe the theory and practice of recombi- 
nant DNA technology, and its application within molecular biology 
research. Topics will include the cloning of genes from various 
organisms, plasmid construction, transcriptional and translational 
gene fusions, nucleic acid probes, site-directed mutagenesis, poly- 
merase chain reaction, and transgenic animals. The goal of the 
course is to make the research-oriented student aware of the wealth 
of experimental approaches available through this technology. Two 
lectures per week. 
Charles S. Hoffman 

BI 507 Computational Biology (Spring: 3) 

Necessary concepts from molecular biology and probability theory 
will be presented. 
Course requires algorithm development and programming skills. 

Introduction to computational molecular biology, with focus 
on the development and implementation of efficient algorithms for 
problems generally related to genomics. Sample topics include 
sequence homology and alignment, phylogenetic tree construction 



("All about Eve"), hidden Markov models and their applications 
(e.g., multiple sequence alignment, recognition of genes), RNA sec- 
ondary structure prediction, protein folding on lattice models, and 
determination of DNA strand separation sites in duplication and 
replication. Algorithmic content of course: genetic algorithms, sim- 
ulated annealing, clustering, dynamic programming, recursion. 
Peter Clote 

BI 509 Vertebrate Cell Biology (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: BI 304 

This is an advanced cell biology course focusing on the inte- 
gration of gene activity, subcellular structure, extracellular signals, 
and specialized function in vertebrate cells. The course will involve 
an in-depth study of differentiated cell types, including erythrocytes, 
nerve and muscle cells, epithelia, and cells of the immune system. 
The molecular and genetic bases for diseases affecting these cell types 
will be discussed. The course will also include recent developments 
in the area of cell cycle control and the transformation of normal 
cells into cancerous cells. 
Clare O'Connor 

BI 510 General Endocrinology (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: Introductory Biology or permission of instructor 
Suggested: Organic Chemistry, Physiology 

Many tissues (e.g., the brain, heart, kidney) as well as the clas- 
sical endocrine organs (e.g., adrenal, thyroid) secrete hormones. This 
course is concerned with normal and clinical aspects of hormone 
action. The effects of hormones (and neurohormones) on interme- 
diary metabolism, somatic and skeletal growth, neural development 
and behavior, development of the gonads and sexual identity, min- 
eral regulation and water balance, and mechanisms of hormone 
action will be considered. 
Carol Halpern 

BI 533 Cellular Transport and Disease (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: BI 304 and 305, or permission of the instructor 

The biology of intracellular traffic is in an exciting period of 
development. New techniques of molecular and cell biology are 
leading to discoveries of the transport signals and the major carriers. 
Topics covered in this course include: (1) transport of proteins and 
different classes of RNAs into and out of the nucleus, (2) transport 
of proteins into mitochondria and into ER, and (3) vesicular trans- 
port. Specific transport deficiencies causing diseases will be dis- 
cussed. In addition, the course will describe how different viruses 
(HIV, papillomaviruses, adenoviruses, influenza virus) exploit the 
intracellular transport pathways of host cells during their life cycle. 
Junona Moroianu 

BI 541 Molecular Immunobiology (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: BI 304-305, BI 435 or CH 561, or consent of instructor 

This course will focus on the regulation of the immune 
response at the molecular level. Topics will include the regulation of 
B and T cell development; function of B and T lymphocytes in the 
immune response; the molecular basis underlying the generation of 
antibody and T cell receptor diversity; and antigen processing via 
MHC I and MHC II pathways. The course will place a heavy 
emphasis on experimental approaches to study immune regulation 
and will make extensive use of the research literature in order to 
cover recent advances in areas such as lymphocyte activation, toler- 
ance, and clonal deletion. 
Thomas Chiles 
BI 554 Physiology (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: BI 200-202 

This is a study of the fundamental principles and physico- 
chemical mechanisms underlying cellular and organismal function. 



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Mammalian organ-systems will be studied, with an emphasis on 

neurophysiology, cardiovascular function, respiratory function, renal 

function, and gastro-intestinal function. An optional laboratory (BI 

555) is also offered. 

Grant W. Balkema 

BI 555 Laboratory in Physiology (Fall: 1) 

Prerequisite: BI 554 

Corequisite: BI 554 

This course is intended to complement BI 554 and, although it is 

not a required corequisite of BI 554, it is strongly recommended. 

Lab fee required 

This laboratory course investigates both the four major organ 
systems (respiratory, cardiovascular, renal, and gastro-intestinal) and 
neurophysiology. The majority of the course consists of computer 
simulations and tutorials. A few wet labs will be used to illustrate 
specific principles. One three-hour lab meeting per week is required. 
Grant W. Balkema 

BI 556 Developmental Biology (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: BI 304 and 305 or permission of the instructor 

Developmental biology is in the midst of a far-reaching revolu- 
tion that profoundly effects many related disciplines including evolu- 
tionary biology, morphology, and genetics. The new tools and strate- 
gies of molecular biology have begun to link genetics and embryolo- 
gy and to reveal an incredible picture of how cells, tissues, and organ- 
isms differentiate and develop. This course describes both organismal 
and molecular approaches which lead to a detailed understanding of 

(1) how it is that cells containing the same genetic complement can 
reproducibly develop into drastically different tissues and organs; and 

(2) the basis and role of pattern information in this process. 
Laura Hake 

BI 558 Neurogenetics (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisite: Genetics and Biological Chemistry 

The emphasis of this course is on the genetic and biochemical 
basis of neurological diseases in humans and mice. Special attention 
will be given to lipid storage disease, epilepsy, Huntington's disease, 
Alzheimer's disease, and movement disorders. 
Thomas N. Seyfried 

BI 570 Biology of the Nucleus (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: BI 304-305 

This course provides an in-depth treatment of the molecular 
biology of DNA and RNA, with particular emphasis on the control 
and organization of the genetic material of eukaryotic organisms. 
Topics covered include chromatin structure and function, DNA 
replication, nucleosome assembly, introns, RNA processing, and gene 
regulation. 

Anthony T. Annunziato 

BI 580 Molecular Biology Laboratory (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: BI 440 or BI 506 or equivalent 
Corequisite: BI 440 or BI 506 or equivalent 

Lab fee required. This course can satisfy the major requirement for 
EITHER an upper division biology elective OR for two laborato- 
ry credits, but NOT BOTH. 

An advanced project laboratory for hands-on training in the 
experimental techniques of molecular biology under close faculty 
supervision. In addition to formal lab training and discussion sec- 
tions, students will have access to the lab outside class hours to work 
on projects intended to produce publication quality data. Methods 
taught will include macromolecular purification, electrophoretic 
analysis, recombinant DNA and cloning techniques, DNA sequenc- 
ing, polymerase chain reaction, and the use of computers and 



national databases for the analysis of DNA and protein sequences. 
Ideal for students who desire a solid introduction to the methods of 
molecular biology through practical training. 
Mariana Tran 

Graduate Course Offerings 
BI 611 Advanced Genetics (Fall: 2) 

This course is designed for graduate students who have suc- 
cessfully completed an undergraduate genetics course. Topics 
include the principles of DNA replication and repair, transmission 
genetics, microbial genetics, transposition, epistasis and comple- 
mentation, and gene mapping. 
The Department 
BI 612 Graduate Biochemistry (Fall: 2) 

This course is designed for graduate students who have suc- 
cessfully completed an undergraduate biochemistry course. The 
course concentrates on the biochemistry of biologically significant 
macromolecules and macromolecular assemblies. Topics include the 
elements of protein structure and folding, principles of protein 
purification and analysis, enzymology, nucleic acid biochemistry, 
and the structure and function of biological membranes. 
The Department 
BI 614 Graduate Molecular Biology (Spring: 2) 

This course is designed for graduate students who have suc- 
cessfully completed an undergraduate biochemistry course. The 
course concentrates on the biochemistry of biologically significant 
macromolecules and macromolecular assemblies. Topics include the 
elements of protein structure and folding, principles of protein 
purification and analysis, enzymology, nucleic acid biochemistry, 
and the structure and function of biological membranes. 
The Department 
BI 6 1 5 Advanced Cell Biology (Spring: 2) 

This course is designed for graduate students who have suc- 
cessfully completed an undergraduate course in cell biology. Topics 
include the principles of cellular organization and function, regula- 
tion of the cell cycle, interactions between cells and cellular signal- 
ing pathways. 
The Department 
BI 621, 622, 623 Research Rotation I, II, and III (Fall/Spring: 1) 

Graduate students participate in research projects under the 
direction of a faculty member. 
The Department 
BI 799 Readings and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Intended for M.S. students who are acquiring a knowledge of the 
literature and experimental methods associated with their research 
projects under the guidance of a faculty research advisor. Participation 
in research group meetings, journal clubs, data clubs, etc., may be 
required. A maximum of six credits may be earned from this course. 
The Department 
BI 801 Thesis Seminar (Fall/Spring: 3) 

A research problem of an original nature will be addressed. This 
course is designed for M.S. candidates under the direction of a facul- 
ty member. A maximum of six credits may be earned from this course. 
The Department 
BI 805-806 Departmental Seminar (Fall/Spring: 1) 

This is a series of research seminars conducted by leading sci- 
entists, both from within the Department and from other institu- 
tions, that are presented on a regular (usually weekly) basis. 
Mare Muskavitch 

BI 827 Seminar in the History of Neurobiology (Fall: 1) 
Sanford Palay 



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BI 888 Interim Study (Fall/Spring: 0) 

Required for Master's candidates who have completed all course 
requirements but have not taken comprehensive examinations. Also 
for Master's students (only) who have taken up to six credits of Thesis 
Seminar, but have not yet finished writing their thesis. 
The Department 

BI 998 Doctoral Comprehensive (Fall/Spring: 0) 

Required for Doctoral students who have completed all course 
requirements, but are preparing for comprehensive examinations. 
The Department 
BI 999 Doctoral Continuation (Fall/Spring: 0) 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy for the 
Ph.D. degree are required to register and to pay the fee for doctoral 
continuation during each semester of their candidacy. Doctoral 
Continuation requires a commitment of at least 20 hours per week 
working on the dissertation. 
The Department 

Black Studies 

Departmental Notes 

Director: Frank F. Taylor, 617-552-3239 

• Program Assistant: Sandra Sandiford, 617-552-3238 

• World Wide Web: 
http://infoeagle.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/blksp/ 

Undergraduate Program Description 

Black Studies at Boston College is an interdisciplinary program 
that offers or cosponsors courses in several disciplines. Through cours- 
es in history, literature, sociology, philosophy, theology, and the arts, 
students may pursue a variety of approaches to understanding the 
Black experience. In addition, the Black Studies Program sponsors a 
four (4) week summer study program in the Caribbean for under- 
graduates who have completed at least one Black Studies course. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
BK 104-105 Afro-American History I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with HS 189-190 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

The two-semester survey examines the history and culture of 
African-Americans from the pre-colonial period to the present. The first 
semester treats the period before the middle passage, the evolution of 
slave and free society, the development of Black institutions, and the 
emergence of protest movements up to the end of the Civil War. During 
the second semester, the emphases are placed on issues of freedom and 
equality from Reconstruction, urban migration, civil rights struggles, 
through current consideration of race, class, and gender conflicts. 
Karen Miller 

BK 106 Introduction to Afro-American Literature (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with EN 418 

A survey of African-American literature from its oral begin- 
nings to the present. Emphasis is on major authors and works that 
exemplify key elements of language, style, subject, and theme. The 
course explores the literary treatment of the historical and social 
experiences of Blacks in the United States. 
Joyce Hope Scott 

BK 120 Religion in Africa (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with TH 107 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

See course description in the Theology Department. 
Aloysius Lugira 



BK 121 Christianity in Africa (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with TH 108 

See course description in the Theology Department. 
Aloysius Lugira 

BK 151 Race Relations (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with SC 041 

See course description in the Sociology Department. 
Seymour Leventman 

BK 155 Introduction to African-American Society (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with SC 043 
Satisfies CtJtural Diversity Core Requirement 

See course description in the Sociology Department. 
William Harris 

BK 200 Black Aesthetic, Music, and Empowerment 
Lawrence Watson 
BK 210 Survey of the African-American Societies (Spring: 3) 

Malcolm X defined African-Americans as all people of African 
descent living in the Western Hemisphere. Given this as true, what 
then accounts for the differences between African-Americans who 
are Brazilians, Jamaicans, Haitians and North Americans? Did the 
Africans who were brought to the New World just adopt the cus- 
toms and mores of their captors or did they bring African traditions 
with them? How much impact did these settlers have on the shaping 
of these new societies? This course will show the ways in which 
Africans adjusted to and overcame the conditions and circumstances 
in which they found themselves in the New World and survey the 
Africans adaptation to European domination and the effects of their 
encounters with European settlers and their descendants in the USA, 
Africa, the Caribbean and Latin America. 
Sandra Sandiford 

BK 213 African Slave Trade (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with HS 3 1 1 

See course description in the History Department. 
David Northrup 

BK216 Black Women Writers (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with EN 474 

A survey of Black woman prose or poetry writers of the United 
States, from slavery to the present, and their subjects, themes, and 
styles. Focus is on the origin and continuity of a Black woman's lit- 
erary tradition. Major thematic emphasis is on questions of heritage 
and identity: the African past, the legacy of slavery, social roles, and 
relationships. 
Joyce Hope Scott 

BK 234 Blacks in the Electronic Media (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with CO 120 

Media shape and reflect perceptions of reality. This course 
examines the roles and images of African-Americans and other peo- 
ples of color in radio and television. It also examines the history and 
nature of African-American participation in the radio and television 
industries in front of and behind the cameras and the microphones. 
The course examines the nature of the world presented by the broad- 
cast media — ^who inhabits that world, and what do they do in it. 
Lawrence Watson 

BK 240 Introduction to Black Theatre (Spring: 3) 
Elizabeth Hadley 

BK 242 Black Women and Feminism (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with SC 242 

The course will explore the issues of double discrimination, the 
matriarchy, overachievement, male/female relationships, and fear of 
success. These themes will make the connections among the politi- 



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cal priorities Black women must set when forced to choose between 
gender and race. A survey of the relationships between suffragists 
and later major American woman's activist organizations and Afro- 
American women will be offered. 
Elizabeth Hadley 
BK 253 Eyes On The Prize: Issues in Civil Rights (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course is a comprehensive history of the people, the sto- 
ries, the events, and the issues of the civil rights struggle in America. 
The course focuses on the stories of the little-known men and 
women who made this social movement and presents the material so 
that both those who lived through these turbulent years and those 
too young to remember them will come to know their importance 
in our lives. 
Derrick C. Evans 

BK 266 Rhythm and Blues in American Music (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with MU 321 

This course examines the elements of rhythm and blues in the 
Afro-American sense and traces the influence of these elements on 
American popular and classical music from the early 1900s to the 
present. Records, tapes, and audio-visual material that include music 
from the early New Orleans period to present day Jazz/Rock and 
music videos will be used throughout the course. 
Hubert Walters 

BK 268 The History and Development of Racism (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with PL 268/SC 268 

See course description in the Philosophy Department. 
Horace Seldon 

BK 28 1 American Labor and Civil Rights Issues (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with SC 279 

A comprehensive analysis of the effects of government policy 
and employer and labor union practices on the status of Black work- 
ers. The consequences of automation and technological change for 
Black labor, the changing judicial perception of employment discrim- 
ination, the role of federal contract compliance, and the effects of anti- 
poverty programs among the urban Black population will be studied. 
Christopher Nteta 

BK 285 Jazz in America (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with MU 322 

This course provides a thorough and detailed study and exam- 
ination of the Black music that has come to be known as jazz. The 
socio-political nature of Black music in America, Black music in 
education, and the relations of Black music and the mass media are 
considered. 
Hubert Walters 

BK290 Gospel Workshop (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Cross listed with MU 096 

The Voices of Imani Gospel Choir will provide the laboratory 
experience for the course. Members of the class will be required to 
attend a number of rehearsals and performances of the Imani 
singers. Members of the class may sing in the choir, but it is not 
required for the course. 
Hubert Walters 

BK 299 Readings and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
The Department 

BK 318 Post Slavery History of Caribbean (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with HS318 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

See course description in the History Department. 
Frank E Taylor 



BK 325 Revolutionary Cuba: History and Politics (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Cross listed with HS 325 

Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

See course description in the History Department. 
Erank E Taylor 

BK 345 Contemporary Praxis and Ideology (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with PL 304 

This course reviews the literature to discern why victims of 
oppression revolt and what methodologies they employ to remedy 
their situations. It examines human activities and ideas that shape 
contemporary societies from a Third World perspective and consid- 
ers their implication for international peace and justice. Black con- 
sciousness in southern Africa will be compared to revolutionary con- 
sciousness in Central America. Other revolutionary movements in 
Africa, Asia and Latin America will also be explored. Analysis of 
these movements will include a focus on gender discrimination. 
James Woodard 
BK 350 Racism and American Law (Spring: 3) 

This is a survey course designed to examine some of the legal 
underpinnings of racism in American law. Specifically, it will exam- 
ine the legislation and case law beginning when race was introduced 
to the United States through the institution of slavery to the present 
debates on Affirmative Action. As such it will focus on the following: 
the origins of slavery to Emancipation (1619-1863), Emancipation 
to legalized racial segregation (1863-1896), segregation to desegrega- 
tion (1896-1954), and desegregation to integration (1954-present). 
Finally, it will examine the influences of race on the criminal justice 
system and civil rights legislation. 
Charles Walker, Jr. 

BK 365 U.S. Foreign Policy and South Africa (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with HS 213 

This course examines the United States policy toward South 
Africa from 1948 to the present. The first half of the course com- 
pares the history and nation-building process of the two countries. 
The second half of the course evaluates the ethics, morality, and geo- 
political consequences of that policy, including its economic, politi- 
cal and social significance. The Nixon/Ford years and Reagan/Bush 
years will be thoroughly covered. Other major southern Africa liber- 
ation movements will be studied. There will also be an analysis of the 
role of the United States Free South Africa Movement as influences 
of US policy toward South Africa. 
James Woodard 

BK 373 Slave Societies in Caribbean and Latin America (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with HS 373 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

See course description in the History Department. 
Erank Taylor 

BK 402 Black Images in Film (Spring: 3) 
Elizabeth Hadley 

BK 410 African-American Writers (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with EN 482 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

See course description in the English Department. 
Henry Blackwell 

BK 493 Racism, Oppression and Cultural Diversity (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Permission of Graduate School of Social Work 
Cross listed with SW 723 

See course description in the Graduate School of Social Work. 
The Department 



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BK 500 Caribbean Summer Study (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Department permission required. Interested students 
should apply to Dr. Frank Taylor, Director of the Black Studies 
Program, by April 1. 

The program will entail a 3-week stay in the Caribbean and vis- 
its to two island states, Barbados and Antigua. In Barbados, students 
will stay in the dormitories at the University of the West Indies and 
in Antigua, at the Methodist Conference Center. Students partici- 
pate in an intensive program of lectures and discussions covering: 
Caribbean History and Politics, Caribbean Literature and 
Anthropology, and Caribbean Economic Problems. Students have 
the opportunity of visiting places of historical interest — museums, 
old sugar plantations, fortifications and the like — and are able to 
participate in popular festivals like the Crop Over Festival in 
Barbados and the Antigua carnival. 
Frank Taylor 

BK 512 History of Black Nationalism (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Students must have taken one African-American History course. 

This course examines the evolution and diversity of Black 
Nationalism and nationalist ideologies in the United States from the 
early 19th century through the present. Detailed study of several dis- 
tinct nationalist strategies — including emigrationist, separatist, cul- 
tural, and accommodationist — and their proponents will allow stu- 
dents to analyze and compare the forces influencing the evolution, 
proliferation, retrenchment, and resurgence of nationalist constructs 
at various points in African American history. 
Karen K. Miller 

BK 592 Black Studies Minor: Thesis Preparation (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Must be a Black Studies Minor 

The final requirement for students pursuing the minor in Black 
Studies is the Black Studies Minor Thesis. The thesis provides the 
opportunity to intensively research, analyze, and write critically 
about an issue relevant to the African, African American, or 
Caribbean experience. 
Frank Taylor 

Undergraduate and Graduate Course Offerings 
BK 606 Racial Violence in American History (Fall: 3) 

Crystal Feimster 

BK 799 Readings and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Frank Taylor 

Chemistry 

Faculty 

Joseph Bomstein, Professor Emeritus; B.S., Boston College; 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Andre J. de Bethune, Professor Emeritus; B.S., St. Peter's College; 

Ph.D., Columbia University 

Robert F. O'Malley, Professor Emeritus; B.S., M.S., Boston 

College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Michael J. Clarke, Professor; A.B., Catholic University; M.S., 

Ph.D., Stanford University 

Paul Davidovits, Professor; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Columbia 

University 

John Fourkas, Professor; B.A., M.A., California Institute of 

Technology; Ph.D., Stanford University 

Amir H. \io\eyAa-, Joseph Vanderslice Professor; B.A., Columbia 

University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Evan R. Kantrowitz, Professor; A.B., Boston University; A.M., 

Ph.D., Harvard University 



T. Ross Kelly, Vanderslice Professor; B.S., Holy Cross College; 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 

David L. McFadden, Professor; Chairperson of the Department; 

A.B., Occidental College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

Larry W. McLaughlin, Professor; B.Sc, University of California at 

Riverside; Ph.D., University of Alberta 

Scott J. Miller, Professor; B.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Mary F. Roberts, Professor; A.B., Bryn Mawr College; Ph.D., 

Stanford University 

Dennis J. Sardella, Professor; B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., Illinois 

Institute of Technology 

Lawrence T. Scott, Professor; A.B., Princeton University; Ph.D., 

Harvard University 

William H. Armstrong, Associate Professor; B.S., Bucknell 

University; Ph.D., Stanford University 

E. Joseph Billo, Jr., Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 

McMaster University 

Udayan Mohanty, Associate Professor; B.Sc, Cornell University; 

Ph.D., Brown University 

Marc ^a3i^^&[, Aissistant Professor; B.S., Union College; Ph.D., 

Stanford University 

Martha M. Teeter, Associate Professor; B.A., Wellesley College; 

Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Shana Kelley, Assistant Professor; B.A., Seton Hall University; 

Ph.D., California Institute of Technology 

Departmental Notes 

• Undergraduate Program Information: Dr. Joseph Billo, 
617-552-3619 

• Administrative Secretary: Dale Mahoney, 617-552-2830, 
dale.mahoney@bc.edu 

• Graduate Program Information: Dr. Lawrence Scott, 
617-552-8024 

• Chemistry Department Main Office: 617-552-3606 

• World Wide Web: http://ch03.bc.edu/ 

Undergraduate Program Description 

The Chemistry Department offers a flexible curriculum for 
those who wish to acquire a knowledge of chemistry within the envi- 
ronment of a liberal arts college. The Chemistry Department is 
approved by the ACS Committee on Professional Training. 
Major Requirements 

The major in Chemistry consists of 10 one-semester courses as 
follows: two semesters of general chemistry with laboratory (CH 
109-1 10 and CH lll-112orCH 117-118 and CH 119-120), two 
semesters of organic chemistry with laboratory (CH 231-232 and 
CH 233-234 or CH 241-242 and CH 233-234), one semester of 
analytical chemistry with laboratory (CH 351 and CH 353), one 
semester of inorganic chemistry with laboratory (CH 222 and CH 
224), two semesters of physical chemistry (CH 575-576), one 
semester of advanced laboratory (CH 566) and one semester of bio- 
chemistry (CH 561). In addition, the following are required: two 
semesters of physics with laboratory (PH 211-212 and PH 203- 
204), three semesters of caluclus (MT 102-103 and MT 202). 

The preceding fulfills the Boston College requirements for a 
B.S. degree in Chemistry. For this degree to be also certified by the 
American Chemical Society, two additional chemistry laboratory 
electives are required, usually CH 591-592. 

The recommended sequence for the Chemistry major is as follows: 

First year: CH 109-1 10 General Chemistry with Laboratory or 
CH 117-118 Principles of Modern Chemistry with Laboratory; two 



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semesters of Physics with Laboratory (PH 209-210 or 211-212 with 
PH 203-204); two semesters of Calculus (MT 102-103); 4 Core 
courses. 

Second year: CH 231-232 Organic Chemistry or CH 241 -242 
Honors Organic Chemistry with Laboratory; CH 351 Analytical 
Chemistry with Laboratory; CH 222 Introduction to Inorganic 
Chemistry with Laboratory; MT 202 Calculus (MT 305 in second 
semester is recommended); 4 elective or Core courses. 

Third year: CH 575-576 Physical Chemistry; CH 556 
Advanced Chemistry Laboratory; 6 elective or Core courses. 

Fourth year: CH 561 Biochemistry I (CH 562 in second semes- 
ter is recommended); 7 elective or Core courses. 
Information for First Year Majors and Non-Majors 

Students who intend to be Chemistry or Biochemistry majors 
must enroll in CH 109 General Chemistry and CH 111 General 
Chemistry Laboratory, or CH 117 Principles of Modern Chemistry 
and CH 119 Modern Chemistry Laboratory. The choice of 
Chemistry or Biochemistry as a major requires that certain courses 
in other disciplines be taken as soon as possible. 
Minor Requirements 

The minor in Chemistry consists of six courses. Two semesters 
of general chemistry are required as the introductory courses for the 
minor. Four additional chemistry courses chosen in consultation 
with a faculty advisor and approved by the director of the depart- 
mental minor, Professor E. Joseph Billo (Merkert 317, ext. 2-3619) 
are required to complete the minor. Normally, two of the four addi- 
tional courses would be Organic Chemistry I and II, but other selec- 
tions might be better choices, depending on the student's objective 
in attaining the minor. 
Information for Study Abroad 

Before going abroad. Chemistry majors must have completed the 
following prerequisites: General Chemistry, CH 109-1 10 or CH 117- 
118 and lab; Organic Chemistry CH 231-232 or CH 241-242 and 
lab; Analytical Chemistry, CH 351 and lab; Inorganic Chemistry, CH 
222 and lab; Calculus, MT 102-103 and MT 202; Physics, PH 21 1- 
212 and lab. Exceptions must be approved by the department. 

In order for a course studied abroad to count for major credit, 
prior department approval is required for each course. Students must 
meet with the department study abroad advisor for course approval, 
advisement, and planning: Professor E. Joseph Billo and/or Professor 
David McFadden. 
Fulfilling the Core Science Requirement 

The requirement of two courses in natural science may be ful- 
filled by any of the following courses: CH 105, CH 106, CH 109 
with CH 111,CH llOwithCH 112. The courses specifically intend- 
ed for students who are not science majors are CH 105 and CH 106. 
Biochemistry Major 

Refer to the Biochemistry section for a description of this inter- 
disciplinary major. 

Graduate Program Description 

The Department of Chemistry offers programs leading to the 
degrees of Doctor of Philosophy and Master of Science in inorganic 
chemistry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, and biochemistry. 
The Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T.) program is administered 
through the Lynch School Graduate Programs in cooperation with 
the Department of Chemistry. It requires admission to both the 
Lynch Graduate School of Education and to the Department of 
Chemistry. Course requirements vary depending upon the candi- 
date's prior teaching experience; however, all Master's programs lead- 
ing to certification in secondary education include practica experi- 



ences in addition to course work. Students seeking certification in 
Massachusetts are required to pass the Massachusetts Educators 
Certification Test. For further information on the M.S.T, please 
refer to the Lynch School Graduate Programs section entitled, 
"Master's Programs in Secondary Teaching," or call the Office of 
Graduate Admissions, GSOE, at 617-552-4214. 

All entering graduate students take placement examinations in 
inorganic, organic, biochemistry, and physical chemistry. The results 
of these examinations will be used to determine which courses each 
student should take. 
Degree Requirements 

Every student is expected to attain a grade point average of at 
least 2.50 at the end of his or her second semester in the Graduate 
School and to maintain it thereafter. If this standard is not met, the 
student may be required to withdraw from the graduate program. 
There is no total credits requirement for the Ph.D. degree; 30 cred- 
its are required for the M.S. degree. 

At the end of the second year, Ph.D. candidates must pass an 
oral exam that stresses material from their own research specialty and 
other related areas. Members of the student's thesis committee com- 
prise the exam committee. Students who do not pass this exam will 
be placed in the M. S. degree program. 

The Master's program requires that the student complete a 
minimum of 30 graduate credits of course work. Students typically 
accumulate 1 8 to 20 credits during the first year. In the second year, 
the course credits usually include three credits for graduate seminar 
(CH 821-822, 831-832, 861-862 or 871-872, depending on the 
area of study) and six credits for thesis research (CH 801 Thesis 
Seminar). Students who have completed six credits of Thesis 
Seminar, but who have not finished their thesis must register for CH 
802 Thesis Direction. Students should register for CH 997 Master's 
Comprehensive during the semester in which they intend to submit 
and defend their M.S. thesis. 

The Comprehensive Examination for the M.S. degree is a public, 
oral defense of the student's research thesis. The Ph.D. Comprehensive 
Examination consists of a series of cumulative examinations that test 
the student's development in his or her major field of interest, and crit- 
ical awareness and understanding of the current literature. 

Both the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees require a thesis based upon 
original research, either experimental or theoretical. During the sec- 
ond year, research will be the major effort of the student seeking a 
Master's degree. For the Ph.D. candidate, a research project requir- 
ing four to four and one-half years of sustained effort will begin usu- 
ally after the first semester of study. An oral defense of the disserta- 
tion before a faculty thesis committee completes the degree require- 
ments. A public presentation of the thesis is also required. 

Some teaching or equivalent educational experience is required. 
This requirement may be satisfied by at least one year of service as a 
teaching assistant or by suitable teaching duties. Arrangements are made 
with each student for a teaching program best suited to his/her overall 
program of studies. Waivers of teaching requirements may be granted 
under special circumstances with the approval of the chairperson. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
CH 105-106 Chemistry and Society I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 
For non-science majors or for those who do not require a lab sci- 
ence course 

For non-science majors or for those who do not require a lab sci- 
ence course. This is a two semester sequence with the emphasis during 



64 



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the first semester placed on basic chemical principles and their applica- 
tion to environmental issues. Topics covered include air and water pol- 
lution, global warming, ozone depletion, hazardous waste, energy use 
and alternative energy sources. The goal of the course is to develop a 
knowledge base from which one can make intelligent decisions about 
local global environmental issues as well as formulate solutions to the 
ever-increasingly complex problems of today's technological society. 
The Department 

CH 109-110 General Chemistry I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: One year of high school chemistry 
Corequisites: CH 111, CH 113, MT 102-103 
Prerequisites: CH 109, 111 
Corequisites: CH 112, CH 114, MT 102-103 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

This course is intended for students whose major interest is sci- 
ence or medicine. It offers a rigorous introduction to the principles 
of chemistry, with special emphasis on quantitative relationships, 
chemical equilibrium, and the structures of atoms, molecules, and 
crystals. The properties of the more common elements and com- 
pounds are considered against a background of these principles and 
the periodic table. 
E. Joseph Billo 
Paul Davidovits 
Dennis J. Sardella 

CH 111-112 General Chemistry Laboratory I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Lab fee required 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in CH 109. One 
three-hour period per week. 
The Department 

CH 113-114 General Chemistry Discussion I and II (Fall/Spring: 0) 
Required of all students in CH 109-1 10. Discussion of lecture 
topics and problem-solving methods, in small groups. 
The Department 

CH 117 Principles of Modern Chemistry I (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor 
Corequisites: CW 119, 121 

Part I of CH 117-118, the Honors alternative to General 
Chemistry, CH 109-1 10. It is intended for students from any major 
(including undecided) with a strong foundation and interest in 
chemistry. CH 117 begins with the theoretical description of atom- 
ic and molecular structure and with examples of modern experi- 
mental techniques for visualizing and manipulating individual 
atoms and molecules. The Laws of Thermodynamics and Kinetics 
are studied to understand why chemical reactions occur at all, why 
it is that once reactions start they can't go all the way to completion, 
and how molecules act as catalysts to speed up reactions without 
being consumed themselves. 
David L. McFadden 

CH 118 Principles of Modern Chemistry II (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: CH 1 1 7 
Corequisites: CH 120, CH 122 

This is the second part of a one year course that serves as the 
Honors alternative to the two-semester General Chemistry CH 109- 
110. This course will build upon the chemical fundamentals that 
were covered in the first semester to introduce organic chemistry as 
well as its physical basis. Topics to be covered include the structure 
and reactivity of organic compounds. An emphasis on biologically 
relevant structures will highlight an interdisciplinary presentation. 
Scott J. Miller 



CH 119-120 Modern Chemistry Laboratory I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 1) 
Lab fee required 

Laboratory required for all students enrolled in CH 117-118. 
This laboratory course stresses discovery-based experiments. It uses 
state-of-the-art instrumentation to illustrate the principles discussed 
in CH 117-118, and introduces students to techniques used in mod- 
ern chemical research. One three-hour period per week. 
David L. McFadden 
Scott J. Miller 

CH 121-122 Modern Chemistry Discussion I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 0) 

Required of all students in CH 117-118. Discussion of lecture 
topics and problem-solving methods in small groups. 
The Department 

CH 161 Life Science Chemistry (Fall: 3) 
Corequisite: CH 163 

This course first introduces basic chemical principles, in prepa- 
ration for a discussion of the chemistry of living systems that forms 
the major part of the course. Organic chemical concepts will be 
introduced as necessary, and applications will be made wherever pos- 
sible to physiological processes and disease states that can be under- 
stood in terms of their underlying chemistry. 
Kenneth R. Metz 

CH 163 Life Science Chemistry Laboratory (Fall: 1) 
Lab fee required 

A laboratory course that includes experiments illustrating 
chemical principles and the properties of compounds consistent 
withCH 161. 
Kenneth R. Metz 

CH 222 Introduction to Inorganic Chemistry (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: CH 109-110 
Corequisite: CH 224 

This course offers an introduction to inorganic chemistry. 
Topics include the following: principles of structure and bonding, 
ionic and covalent bonding, acid-base concepts, coordination chem- 
istry, organometallic chemistry, and inorganic chemistry in biological 
systems. 

William H. Armstrong 

CH 224 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory (Spring: 1) 
Lab fee required 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in CH 222. One 
four-hour period per week. 
William H. Armstrong 

CH 231-232 Organic Chemistry I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: CH 109-110 
Corequisites: CH 233, CH 235 
Prerequisites: CH 231, CH 233 
Corequisites: CH 234, CH 236 

An introduction to the chemistry, properties, and uses of 
organic compounds. The correlation of structure with properties, 
reaction mechanisms, and the modern approach to structural and 
synthetic problems are stressed throughout. In the laboratory, the 
aim is acquisition of sound experimental techniques through the 
synthesis of selected compounds. 
T Ross Kelly 
Lawrence T Scott 



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CH 233-234 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 1) 
Lab fee required 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in CH 23 1 . One 
four-hour period per week. 
The Department 

CH 235-236 Organic Chemistry Discussion I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 0) 

Required of all students in CH 231-232. Discussion of organ- 
ic synthesis design, spectroscopic analysis, reaction mechanisms and 
other lecture topics in small groups. 
The Department 

CH 241-242 Honors Organic Chemistry I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: CH 117-118 
Corequisites: CH 233, CH 245 
Prerequisites: CH 233, 241 
Corequisites: CH 117-118 
Registration with instructor's approval otJy. 

This course is a continuation of the CH 117-118 honors 
sequence and will concentrate on the structure, bonding and reac- 
tivity of organic compounds. Particular emphasis will be placed on 
stereochemistry, conformational analysis, reaction mechanisms, 
principles of organic synthesis, and modern spectroscopic methods. 
Marc L. Snapper 

CH 245-246 Honors Organic Chemistry Discussion I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 0) 

Required of all students in CH 24 1 . Discussion of organic syn- 
thesis design, spectroscopic analysis, reaction mechanisms, and other 
lecture topics in small groups. 
The Department 

CH 351 Analytical Chemistry (Fall: 4) 

Prerequisites: CH 109-110 
Corequisites: CH 353, CH 355 

This course is an introduction to the principles and practice of 
analytical chemistry, including wet chemical methods and instru- 
mental methods. In the laboratory, the aim is the acquisition of pre- 
cise analytical techniques. 
E. Joseph Billo 

CH 353 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (Fall: 0) 
Lab fee required 

Laboratory required of all students enrolled in CH 351. One 
four-hour period per week. 
E. Joseph Billo 
CH 355 Analytical Chemistry Discussion (Fall: 0) 

Required of all students in CH 351. Discussion of lecture top- 
ics and problem-solving methods, in small groups. 
E. Joseph Billo 

CH 391-392 Undergraduate Research I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: CH 109-110 

Arrangement w^ith an individual faculty member and departmen- 
tal permission are required. CH 591-592 or CH 593-594 cannot 
be taken concurrently. 

Sophomores or juniors who show exceptional ability may engage 
in an independent research project under the supervision of a faculty 
member. The experimental work will be preceded by library research 
on the project and training in essential laboratory techniques. 
The Department 



CH 399 Advanced Independent Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Formerly known as Scholar of the College 

See the College of Arts and Sciences section of this catalog. 
The Department 

CH 473 Physical Chemistry (Biochemistry Majors) (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: CH 231-232, MT 100-101, PH 21 1-212 (or equivalent) 

This course is an introduction to physical chemistry. Topics 
covered are the following: thermodynamics, phase behavior, chemi- 
cal kinetics, quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. Applications to 
biochemical systems are emphasized. 
David L. McFadden 

CH 511-512 Electronics Seminar I and II (Fall/Spring: 0) 
Richard Pijar 

CH 515 Biochemistry Discussion I and II (Fall/Spring: 0) 
The Department 

CH 591-592 Introduction to Chemical Research I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 
Seniors only 

Arrangement with an individual faculty member and department 
permission are required. 

This is a two-semester course and may not be taken for only one 
semester. 

The essential feature of this course is an independent research 
project performed under the supervision of a faculty member. The 
individual work will be preceded by a series of lectures and demon- 
strations on the use of the library and several essential laboratory 
techniques. 
The Department 

CH 593-594 Introduction to Biochemical Research I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 
Seniors only 

Arrangement with an individual faculty member and department 
permission are required. 

This is a two-semester course and may not be taken for only one 
semester. 

Independent research in biochemistry to be carried out under 
the supervision of a faculty member. A written report and an oral 
presentation are required at the end of the second semester. 
The Department 

Undergraduate and Graduate Course Offerings 
CH 520 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry (Fall: 3) 

An introduction to the principles of inorganic chemistry, with 
emphasis on structural and thermodynamic aspects. Topics to be 
covered include atomic structure, group theory, ionic and covalent 
bonding, weak chemical forces, transition metal coordination chem- 
istry, and organometallic and bioinorganic chemistry. 
William H. Armstrong 
CH 531 Modern Methods in Organic Synthesis I (Spring: 3) 

Survey and analysis of reactions employed in the synthesis of 
medicinally significant compounds. An in-depth understanding of 
the physical basis for these transformations is emphasized. Topics 
will relate fundamental structural and electronic properties to issues 
of chemical reactivity. An emphasis will be placed on carbon-carbon 
bond and ring forming reactions. 
Amir Hoveyda 
CH 537 Mechanistic Organic Chemistry (Fall: 3) 

This course will explore factors influencing organic reaction 
mechanisms and methods for their determination. A partial list of 
the topics to be covered includes: chemical bonding and conse- 
quences for structure and reactivity; steric, electronic and stereoelec- 



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tronic effects; conformational analysis; thermodynamic and kinetic 
principles; applications of molecular orbital theory; and reactive 
intermediates. 
Lawrence T. Scott 

CH 539 Principles and Applications of NMR Spectroscopy (Fall: 3) 
This course wiU provide a detailed understanding of the principles 
and applications of NMR spectroscopy. The course is intended for chem- 
istry and biochemistry students who will use NMR in their research. 
Four general aspects of NMR will be considered: theoretical, instrumen- 
tal, experimental, and applied. Emphasis will be placed on understand- 
ing the theoretical concepts and experimental parameters necessary to 
acquire, process, and interpret NMR spectra. The course will include a 
practical component on departmental NMR spectrometers. 
John Boylan 

CH 544 Modern Methods in Organic Synthesis II (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisite: CH 531 

Survey and analysis of contemporary strategies employed in the 
synthesis of medicinally significant natural and unnatural products. 
Examine the creativity and logic of approaches toward medicinally 
important compounds. Topics will include novel strategies toward 
synthetic problems, landmark total syntheses, as well as, issues in the 
current chemical literature. 
Amir Hoveyda 

CH 556 Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (Spring: 3) 
Lab fee required 

This is a two semester chemistry laboratory course designed pri- 
marily for juniors and seniors. Emphasis will be placed on developing 
the skills and techniques required to perform modern chemical exper- 
iments. Interpretation and presentation of data will also be stressed. 
The laboratories will include experiments from thermodynamic, 
kinetic, spectroscopic, electrochemical, and chromatographic areas. 
In addition, basic experimental techniques, experimental design, safe 
laboratory practices, and identification and estimation of sources of 
error in measurements will be included in each experiment. 
Kenneth R. Metz 

CH 560 Principles of Chemical Biology (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: Students need a year of organic chemistry. 

An introduction to the chemistry of biological macromolecules 
including proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates. Students will learn 
the structure and nomenclature of the monomer building blocks as 
well as the macromolecules. Chemical principles that define secondary 
and tertiary biomolecular structure as well as state-of-the-art chemical 
(or chemical-biological) synthetic procedures will be presented. 
Examples of specific types of binding interactions, catalysis or recogni- 
tion processes as viewed from a chemical perspective will be discussed. 
Shana O. Kelley 
Larry W McLaughlin 

CH 561-562 Biochemistry (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: CH 231-232 or equivalent 

This course is a two-semester introductory-level course in bio- 
chemistry. Topics in the first semester concentrate on protein structure 
and function; bioenergetics; kinetics and mechanisms of enzyme reac- 
tions; intermediary metabolism; control of metabolic pathways; and 
photosynthesis. Topics in the second semester concentrate on the struc- 
ture of nucleic acids; recombinant DNA technology; mechanisms of 
gene rearrangements; DNA replication; RNA synthesis and splicing; 
protein synthesis; control of gene expression; membrane transport; and 
hormone action. Experimental methods will also be discussed as they 
relate to course topics and to the separate laboratory course (CH 563). 
Mary E Roberts 
Evan R. Kantrowitz 



CH 564 Physical Methods in Biochemistry (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: CH 561 or BI 435, CH 473 or CH 575 

This course will cover the pratical use of modern physical tech- 
niques for determining the structure of biological macromolecules 
and assemblies. Topics will include absorption, fluorescence, CD, 
and NMR spectroscopy; diffusion, sedimentation, and ligand bind- 
ing; fiber, membrane, and crystal diffraction; cryo-electron 
microscopy, and scanning probe microscopy. 
Mary E Roberts 
CH 565 Chemical Biology: Nucleic Acids (Fall: 3) 

This course will survey the chemical properties and biological 
functions of DNA and RNA, with special attention to recent devel- 
opments that have offered insight into the roles of nucleic acids as sub- 
strates and catalysts in transcription, translation, and RNA processing. 
An introductory level course in biological chemistry is suggested. 
Shana O. Kelley 
Larry W. McLaughlin 
CH 569 Chemical Biology: Enzyme Mechanisms (Spring: 3) 

An analysis of the specificity and catalysis involved by enzymes 
for various biochemical transformations. Enzyme structure will be 
discussed only with respect to substarte binding and functional 
group transformation. Both general and specific mechanisms involv- 
ing nucleophilic, electrophilic and redox reactions, as well as the role 
of coenzymes and various cofactors will be considered. 
Larry W. McLaughlin 
CH 575 Physical Chemistry I (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: CH 231-232, MT 202, PH 211-212 (or equivalent) 

This course deals with the foundations and applications of ther- 
modynamics. Topics include first and second laws of thermodynamics, 
phase diagrams, phase stability, phase transitions, properties of simple 
mixtures, chemical equilibrium, and properties of ions in solutions. 
Udayan Mohanty 

CH 576 Physical Chemistry II (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: CH 575 

This course is an introduction to the principles of reaction 
kinetics, kinetic molecular theory, and quantum mechanics of atoms 
and molecules. Chemistry graduate students may register for this 
course only if they are advised to do so by the department. 
John T Eourkas 

CH 577-578 Physical Chemistry Discussion I and II (Fall/Spring: 0) 
The Department 

CH 589 NMR Macromolecular Structure Determination (Spring: 3) 
Joyn Boylan 

Graduate Course Offerings 

CH 672 Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy (Fall: 3) 

A graduate-level introduction to quantum mechanics and its 
applications in chemistry, and atomic and molecular spectroscopy. 
John T. Eourkas 

CH 777 Polymer Dynamics (Spring: 3) 

Udayan Mohanty 

CH 799 Reading and Research (Fall/Spring: 2) 
Lab fee required 

A course required of Ph.D. matriculants for each semester of 
research. 
The Department 

CH 800 Reading and Research (Spring: 3) 
Lab fee required 

A course required of Ph.D. matriculants for each semester of 
research. 
The Department 



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CH 801 Thesis Seminar (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Lab fee required 

This course is designed for M.S. candidates and includes a 
research problem requiring a thorough literature search and an orig- 
inal investigation under the guidance of a faculty member. 
The Department 
CH 802 Thesis Direction (Fall/Spring: 0) 

A non-credit course for those who have received six credits for 
Thesis Seminar, but who have not finished their thesis. This course 
must be registered for and the continuation fee paid each semester 
until the thesis is completed. 
The Department 
CH 805-806 Departmental Seminar I and II (Fall/Spring: 1) 

This is a series of research seminars by leading scientists, both 
from within the department and from other institutions, that are 
presented on a regular (usually weekly) basis. 
The Department 
CH 821-822 Inorganic Chemistry Seminar I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course consists of discussions of topics of current interest 
in inorganic chemistry with participation by students and faculty 
members. Students will submit papers and give oral presentations of 
topics based on recent literature in inorganic chemistry. Discussions 
of research in progress in the department will be included. 
Occasionally, visiting lecturers will participate. 
William H. Armstrong 
CH 831-832 Organic Chemistry Seminar I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course consists of discussions of topics of current interest 
in organic chemistry, with participation by students and faculty 
members. Students will submit papers and/or give oral presentations 
about topics from the recent literature in organic chemistry. 
Discussions of research in progress in the department will be includ- 
ed. Occasional visiting lecturers will participate. 
Lawrence T. Scott 
CH 861-862 Biochemistry Seminar I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course consists of discussions of topics of current interest 
in organic chemistry with participation by students and faculty 
members. Students will submit papers and/or give oral presentations 
about topics from the recent literature in organic chemistry. 
Discussions of research in progress in the department will be includ- 
ed. Occasional visiting lecturers will participate. 
Shana O. Kelley 
CH 871-872 Physical Chemistry Seminar I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course consists of discussions of topics of current interest 
in physical chemistry with participation by students and faculty 
members. Students will submit papers and give oral presentations of 
topics based on recent literature in physical chemistry. Discussions 
of research in progress in the department will be included. 
Occasionally, visiting lecturers will participate. 
Udayan Mohanty 
CH 888 Interim Study (Fall: 0) 
The Department 
CH 997 Master's Comprehensive (Fall/Spring: 0) 

This course consists of a public, oral defense of the student's 
thesis research. 
The Department 
CH 998 Doctoral Cumulative Examinations (Fall/Spring: 0) 

This course consists of a series of cumulative written examina- 
tions that test the student's development in his or her major field of 



interest (organic, inorganic, analytical, physical, biochemistry), and 

critical awareness and understanding of the current literature. Six of 

sixteen exams must be passed over a two-year period. 

The Department 

CH 999 Doctoral Continuation (Fall/Spring: 0) 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy for the 
Ph.D. degree are required to register and pay the fee for doctoral 
continuation during each semester of their candidacy. Doctoral 
Continuation requires a commitment of at least 20 hours per week 
working on the dissertation. 
The Department 

Classical Studies 

Faculty 

Dia M.L. Philippides, Professor; B.A., Radcliffe College; M.A., 

Boston College; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Charles F. Ahern, Jr., Associate Professor; Chairperson of the 

Department; B.A., Wesleyan University; M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale 

University 

David H. Gill, ^.^., Associate Professor; B.A., M.A., Boston 

College; Ph.D., Harvard University; Lie. Theology, St. Georgen, 

Frankfurt-am-Main 

Christopher McDonough, Assistant Professor; B.A. Tufts 

University; M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University 

of North Carolina 

Departmental Notes 

• Secretary: Lillian Reisman, 617-552-3661, gill@bc.edu 

• World Wide Web: http://fmwww.bc.edu/CL/ 

Undergraduate Program Description 

Classical Studies approaches a liberal education through the 
study, both in the original language and in English, of two litera- 
tures, ancient Greek and Latin, which have exercised a profound 
influence on the formation of western culture. 

The department offers courses under four headings, including 
(1) courses in elementary and intermediate Latin and Greek, 
designed to teach a student to read the languages, (2) courses in 
Greek and Roman literature and culture, including Core Literature 
courses, taught in English and designed to acquaint a student with 
the world of classical antiquity, (3) advanced reading courses in 
ancient authors, taught in the original languages, (4) courses in 
Modern Greek language, literature, and culture. Through coopera- 
tion with other departments, courses are also available in ancient his- 
tory, art, philosophy and religion. 
Major Requirements 

The major aims at teaching careful reading and understanding 
of the Greek and Roman authors in the original languages. It 
requires a minimum often courses, of which eight must be in Latin 
and/or Greek above the elementary level; if a student so chooses, the 
other two may be in English, preferably in Greek and Roman civi- 
lization. There are not separate Greek and Latin majors. Each stu- 
dent works out his/her individual program of study in consultation 
with the Classics faculty. There is, of course, no upper limit on the 
number of courses in the original and/or in translation that a student 
may take, as long as he/she has the essential eight language courses. 
The Minor in Ancient Civilization 

The minor aims at providing students from various majors the 
opportunity to study those aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman 
world that relate to their fields and their other interests without the 
requirement of learning the Latin and Greek languages. Each stu- 



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dent will design lier/liis own program in consultation with the fac- 
ulty. A program will consist of a coherent blend of six courses cho- 
sen from two groups: 

• Greek Civilization and Roman Civilization. These general 
courses, which the department now offers every second year, 
serve as a general overview of the field and introduction to the 
minor. 

• Four other courses, chosen after consultation with the direc- 
tor, from available offerings in Classics and other depart- 
ments, in the areas of literature, philosophy, religion, art and 
archaeology, history, and linguistics. 

A list of the courses that are available each semester from the 
various departments and that can count for the minor will be pub- 
lished at registration time. 
Information for First Year Majors and Non-Majors 

Classical Studies encompasses all the social, material, and intel- 
lectual culture of the ancient Greek and Roman world. It includes 
the study of language and creative literature of political and social 
history, philosophy, religion, and art. For a first-year student, cours- 
es of two types are likely to be of most immediate interest: (1) Core 
literature courses, in which the reading is entirely in English, and (2) 
elementary and intermediate language courses in Latin, Greek, and 
Modern Greek. 

If a student would like to begin a language now, or has had only 
one year of a language in high school, he/she should choose an ele- 
mentary course: CL 010 Latin or CL 020 Greek. If a student has stud- 
ied a language for two or three years in high school, he/she should 
choose an intermediate course: CL 056 Latin or CL 052 Greek. 

Completion of two semesters of Latin or Greek at the interme- 
diate level will fulfill the Arts and Sciences and Carroll School of 
Management language proficiency requirement. In addition, the 
department offers elective courses in ancient civilization and in 
Greek and Roman authors. Those in ancient civilization are taught 
entirely in English; they make excellent choices for freshmen inter- 
ested in antiquity. Those in Greek and Roman authors require a 
background in the appropriate language. If a student has studied 
Latin or Greek for three or four years in high school, he or she may 
wish to try courses in Greek and Roman authors. For further infor- 
mation consult the Chairperson of the department. 
Information for Study Abroad 

The Classics Department does not have a general set of require- 
ments for study abroad. Each student is examined individually, and 
based on their academic records and the specific program, he/she is 
advised accordingly. Students should arrange to meet with Charles 
Ahern, Chairperson when planning to study abroad. 
Core Offerings 

The Department offers several courses that satisfy the Core 
requirement in Literature. In 2002-03, for example. Modern Greek 
Drama in English (CL 166) and Heroic Poetry: Homer, Virgil and 
Beyond (CL 217) will be offered. 
Certification for Teachers 

The Undergraduate Provisional Certification as "Teacher of 
Latin and Classical Humanities 5-12" may be gained by pursuing 
one of the majors in addition to the Secondary Education major or 
the minor in Secondary Education. For further information, contact 
the Chairperson of the department. 



Graduate Program Description 

The department grants M.A. degrees in Latin, Greek, and in 
Latin and Greek together (Classics). The Master of Arts in Teaching 
(M.A.T.) degree in Latin and Classical Humanities is administered 
through the Lynch School Graduate Programs in cooperation with 
the Department of Classics. 

Requirements for the M.A. Degree 

Candidates must complete thirty (30) credits of course work at 
the graduate level, of which six may, with departmental permission, 
consist of a thesis tutorial. In addition, candidates must complete a 
departmental reading list of Latin and/or Greek authors, must 
demonstrate the ability to read a modern foreign language (usually 
French or German), and must pass comprehensive examinations. 
The examinations will be written and oral. The written portion con- 
sisting of translation from the authors on the reading list and an 
essay on one of the passages translated. The oral consists of discus- 
sion with the faculty of a candidate's course work in the history of 
Latin and/or Greek literature, and of a thesis (if offered in partial ful- 
fillment of the requirements) . 
Requirements for the M.A.T. Degree 

The M.A.T. degree in Latin and Classical Humanities requires 
admission to both the Lynch Graduate School of Education and to 
the Department of Classics. All Master's programs leading to certifi- 
cation in secondary education include practica experiences in addi- 
tion to course work. Students seeking certification in Massachusetts 
are required to pass the Massachusetts Educators Certification Test. 

Requirements vary according to a candidate's preparation in 
both classics and education. The normal expectation in Classics is 
that a candidate will complete fifteen credits of course work in Latin, 
will demonstrate the ability to read a modern foreign language (usu- 
ally French or German), and will take written and oral examinations 
in Latin literature. 

For further information on the M.A.T, contact the depart- 
ment Chairperson of the Department of Classical Studies, and refer 
to the Lynch School Graduate Programs section entitled, "Master's 
Programs in Secondary Teaching," or call the Office of Graduate 
Admissions, LGSOE, at 617-552-4214. 

The department also offers courses in Modern Greek language, 
literature, and culture. These courses, listed in full in the undergrad- 
uate section, do not regularly qualify as credits for an M.A. or an 
M.A.T. degree. 

Incoming students can expect to find major Greek and Latin 
authors and genres taught on a regular basis. In Greek these include 
Homer, lyric poets, 5th century dramatists (Aeschylus, Sophocles, 
Euripides, Aristophanes), the historians Herodotus and Thucydides, 
Plato, and 4th century orators. In Latin they include Plautus and 
Terence, the late republican poets Catullus and Lucretius, Cicero, 
Augustan poetry (Virgil, Horace, Elegy and Ovid), the historians 
Livy and Tacitus, and the novel. The Departments of Philosophy, 
Theology, and Slavic and Eastern Languages also offer courses in rel- 
evant areas of the ancient world. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
CL 010-011 Elementary Latin (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course will introduce the fundamentals of Latin grammar 
and vocabulary. The aim is to prepare a student to read simple Latin 
prose. 

David Gill, S.J. 
Robin Orttung 



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CL 020-021 Elementary Ancient Greek (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course will introduce the fundamentals of ancient Greek 
grammar and vocabulary. The aim is to prepare a student to read 
something like Plato's Apology after a year's study. 
John Shea 
CL 052-053 Intermediate Ancient Greek (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course is a review of the essentials of Classical Attic gram- 
mar and a reading of selections from Greek literature, often 
Xenophon's Anabasis, Plato's Apology and/or Crito, or a play such as 
Euripides' Medea. 
Dia M.L. Philippides 
CL 056-057 Intermediate Latin (Fall/Spring: 3) 

A thorough review of essential grammatical forms presented in 
Elementary Latin along with a close reading of an introductory 
selection of Roman prose and poetry. 
Maria Kakavas 
John Shea 

CL 166 Modern Greek Drama in English (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with EN 084.03 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

The Greeks' love of theater did not end with the classical age. 
The course presents a survey of highlights of Modern Greek drama 
centering mainly on the 20th century, with plays such as Tragedy- 
Comedy (N. Kazantzakis), The Courtyard of Miracles (1. Kambanellis), 
The City (L. Anagnostaki), The Wedding Band (D. Kehaides), The 
Match (G. Maniotes). The discontinuity from the ancient Greek the- 
ater may be discussed and a reading performance may be planned. 
The course is offered entirely in English, but provision may be made 
for reading the plays in Greek. 
Dia M. L. Philippides 
CL 186 Greek Civilization (Fall: 3) 
Offered Biennially 

An introduction — through lectures, readings, visuals, discus- 
sion, and written exercises — to the many-sided contribution of the 
Ancient Greeks to the literature, art, and thought of what has come 
to be known as Western Civilization. Topics will include a historical 
overview (3000 B.C.- 323 A.D.), heroic epic {Iliad and Odyssey), 
drama (Tragedy and Comedy), mythology, historiography, political 
theory and practice (especially Athenian Democracy), philosophy, 
sculpture, and architecture. 
David Gill, S.J. 

CL 210 Justice in Ancient Greece (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with PL 210 and TH 211 

The aim of the course is to trace the Greek concept of justice 
from Homer to Aristotle, from the rough, unsystematic notions 
implicit in Epic and Tragedy to the discussions of the Philosophers. 
Topics will include violence, revenge, morality and the gods, and the 
administration of justice. Lectures and readings will be based on 
selections from Homer, Hesiod, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, 
Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. 
David Gill, S.J. 

CL 212-213 Art of Ancient Mediterranean World I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with FA 211-212 

See course description in the Fine Arts Department. 
The Department 

CL 217 Heroic Poetry: Homer, Virgil and Beyond (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with EN 084.06 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

We have two fundamental aims: to explore the process of read- 
ing literary texts closely and analytically and to explore the tradition 



of heroic or "epic" poetry. Readings will range from as far back as 
3,000 B.C.E. (the earliest parts of the Near Eastern story of 
Gilgamesh), through the poems of Homer and Virgil (set in the age 
of the Trojan War, but composed much later and against quite dif- 
ferent cultural backgrounds), to the adaptation of epic grandeur, to 
Christian theology by Milton, and the parody of epic grandeur in 
the satire of Alexander Pope. 
Charles Ahem, Jr. 

CL 219 Greek Art and Archaeology (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with FA 3 1 1 

See course description in the Fine Arts Department. 
Kenneth Craig 

CL 230 Classical Mythology (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with EN 220 

An introduction to the gods and goddesses and to the chief 
cycles of legend in the Greek and Roman story- telling traditions. We 
shall learn the "facts" of myth (the names and places involved) and 
discuss the interpretation of specific literary works. We shall also 
inquire into the origins of traditional stories in early Greece, their 
relation to religious beliefs and practice, and the evolution of their 
use in ancient art and literature. Readings in Hesiod, the Homeric 
Hymns, Greek tragedy, and Ovid's Metamorphoses, supplemented by 
a handbook and a study of modern theories of interpretation. 
Christopher M. McDonough 
CL 232 Ancient Comedy (Spring: 3) 

This class will focus on the comic drama of ancient Greece and 
Rome, particularly the plays of Aristophanes, Plautus and Terence. We 
will consider this literature alongside later works, especially that of 
Shakespeare and Moliere, as well as comic films, particularly the works 
of Preston Sturges, the Marx Brothers, and Woody Allen. A compo- 
nent of the class will involve performances: all students will participate 
in at least one scene, whether acting, directing or managing props. 
Christopher McDonough 

CL 244 Women in the Greek Cultural Spectrum (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with EN 183 

The course will explore the status of women as seen by such authors 
as Homer, Hesiod, Semonides, Sappho and Plato as well as some play- 
wrights and contemporary Greek writers. A wide range of topics will be 
discussed from the above selected readings. There will be a focus on roles 
and relationships between gods and goddesses, husbands and wives, 
mothers (parents) and children as part of the societal structure. 
Maria Kakavas 

CL 262 Roman Civilization (Spring: 3) 
Charles Ahem, Jr. 
CL 275 Greece Viewed Through Her Films (Spring: 3) 

The course looks at Greece through the medium of films made 
chiefly by internationally known Greek filmmakers. We shall discuss 
the historical and political events behind the films, read scenarios and 
literary prototypes, and try to understand the comments being made 
on the internal workings of Greek society and on the relation of Greeks 
to foreigners. The course may provide an opportunity for contrasting 
these films with other views of Greece and for comparing them with 
films of other countries. Almost all the films viewed will have English 
subtitles so that knowledge of modern Greek is not needed. 
Dia M.L. Philippides 

CL 390-391 Reading and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Charles F. Ahem, Jr. 
David Gill, S.J. 
Maria Kakavas 
Dia M.L. Philippides 
Christopher McDonough 



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Undergraduate and Graduate Course Offerings 
CL 070-071 Intermediate Modem Greek (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: CL 060-061 or equivalent 
Offered Biennially 

This second-year course in Modern Greek will provide a review 
of the grammar and introduce the students to the reading of select- 
ed literary excerpts from prose and poetry. 
Maria Kakavas 
CL 262 Roman Civilization (Spring: 3) 

A broad-scale inquiry into Roman historical experience, under- 
standing "Roman" to include not only citizens of Rome, but the var- 
ious peoples who came to live under Roman rule, and understand- 
ing "historical experience" to include art, literature, and religion as 
well as political development and social and economic life. 
Charles E Ahem, Jr. 
CL 329 Ovid's Metamorphoses (Fall: 3) 

Reading (in Latin) and discussion (in English) of selected sto- 
ries from Ovid's long poem about bodily transformations in the 
world of ancient myth. Consideration of the poem in both its liter- 
ary and its historical contexts. What to make of a narrative of insta- 
bility amidst the increasing rigidity of the late Augustan principate? 
Charles E Ahem, Jr. 
CL 384 Christian Latin (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed SL 384 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Michael J. Connolly 

Graduate Course Offerings 

CL 307 Aeschylus: Agamemnon (Fall: 3) 

Aeschylus' tragedy Agamemnon will be read in the original. 
Topics for discussion will include the nature of families; fate, the 
gods, sacrifice; the function of the chorus; language and style. 
Secondary scholarship will be consulted. 
Dia M.L. Philippides 
CL 315 Homer: The Odyssey (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: Two years of Greek or the equivalent. Consult professor 
before registering. 

The aim of the course is to read together the entire Odyssey at 
the rate of roughly one book per two-hour meeting. It is not expect- 
ed that every student will be able — initially at least — to translate a 
whole book for each class. Do as much as you can and watch us do 
the rest — and continue to improve from week to week. 
David Gill, S.J. 
CL 334 Plautus and Terence (Spring: 3) 

Reading and discussion of Roman comedies from the second 
century B.C. We shall study both internal questions of comic struc- 
ture, technique, humor and staging, and external questions of a 
play's relation to the Roman social world in which it was written and 
to the Hellenistic literary context of the New Comedy from which 
Roman comedy developed. 
Christopher McDonough 

CL 346 Latin Prose Composition (Spring: 3) 
A firm knowledge of Latin grammar at the intermediate level is 
required; students who have not previously taken an advanced 
course in Latin should consult with the instructor before enrolling. 

Practice in both the analysis and the composition of Latin prose 
with an emphasis on topics pertaining to sentence structure — word 
groups, coordination and subordination, parallelism. 
Charles E Ahem, Jr. 



CL 395 Caesar (Fall: 3) 

Careful reading, in the original, of Bellum Gallicum, Book I 
(entire) and selections from the rest of 5Gand Bellum Civile. Special 
attention will be paid to Caesar's language and style as well as to his 
manner of telling the story of the Conquest of Gaul, which has been 
described by a modern historian as a "human, economic, and eco- 
logical disaster probably unequalled until the conquest of the 
Americas" (E. Badian, OCD [1994]). 
David Gill, S.J. 

CL 790-791 Readings and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Charles E Ahem, Jr. 
David GiU, S.J. 
Maria Kakavas 
Dia M.L. Philippides.. 
Christopher McDonough 
CL 888 Interim Study (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Charles E Ahem, Jr. 

Communication 

Faculty 

Dorman Picklesimer, Jr., Professor Emeritus; A.B., Morehead State 
University; A.M., Bowling Green State University; Ph.D., Indiana 
University 

MaryT. Kinnane, Professor Emerita; A.^., H.Dip. Ed., Liverpool 
University; A.M., University of Kansas; Ph.D., Boston College 
Dale A. Herbeck, Professor; Chairperson of the Department; B.A., 
Augustana College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Iowa 
Kevin Kersten, S.J., Professor; B.A., M.A., St. Louis University; 
M.A., San Francisco State University; Ph.D., University of 
Wisconsin, Madison 

Marilyn J. Matelski, Professor; A.B., Michigan State University; 
A.M., Ph.D., University of Colorado 

Ann Marie Barry, Associate Professor; B.S., M.A., Salem State 
College; M.S., Ph.D., Boston University 

Lisa CuManz, Associate Professor; B.S., Duke University; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Donald Fishman, Associate Professor; B.A., University of 
Minnesota; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University 
Greg Elmer, Assistant Professor; B.A. Concordia University; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Elfriede V\irsic\i, Assistant Professor; B.A., Katholische Universitaet 
Eichstatt, Germany; M.A., Ph.D. (cand.), University of Georgia 
Ekaterina Raskins, Assistant Professor; B.A. Moscow State Univer- 
sity; M.A., Wake Forest University; Ph.D., University of Iowa 
^oaaie'^eStTsoa, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., Marshall 
University; M.A., Ohio University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Michael MjitiW, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., M.A., University 
of Rhode Island 

Pamela Lannutti, Assistant Professor; B.A., LaSalle University; 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Dana Mastro, Assistant Professor; B.A., University of California, 
Los Angeles; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan State University 
Susannah Stern, Assistant Professor; B.S., Northwestern University; 
M.A, University of Washington; Ph.D., University of North 
Carolina 

William Stanwood, Lecturer; B.S., Ithaca College; M.Ed., Ed.D. 
(cand.), Boston University 
Departmental Notes 

• Department Counselor: Roger Woolsey, Lyons Hall 
302D, 617-552-6148, roger.woolsey@bc.edu 

• Department Administrator: Mary Saunders, Lyons Hall 
215B, 617-552-4280, marysaunders@bc.edu 



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• Department Office: Lyons Hall 215; Phone: 
617-552-4280; Fax: 617-552-2286 

• World Wide Web: http://www.bc.edu/commdept 

• Faculty E-mail: Communication faculty members can 
be reached using the following e-mail format: 
firstname.lastname@bc.edu 

Undergraduate Program Description 

The Department of Communication is concerned with the 
study, criticism, research, teaching and application of the artistic, 
humanistic, and scientific principles of communication. Through a 
series of required classes, the department provides all majors with a 
basic understanding of communication theory and practice. 
Advanced courses allow majors the opportunity to study more 
applied areas such as advertising, digital communication, journal- 
ism, public relations, radio and television. The department also 
offers upper-level courses in communication law and policy, ethics, 
intercultural and international communication, interpersonal and 
group communication, mass communication, political communica- 
tion, and rhetorical studies. 

This program of study has led graduating majors to a wide 
range of communication-related careers in advertising, broadcasting, 
communication education, journalism, and public relations. 
Communication majors have also had success in fields related to 
communication such as business, education, government/politics, 
health, international relations and negotiations, and social and 
human services. Finally, many majors have successfully completed 
graduate programs in business, communication, and law. 
Requirements for the Communication Major 

Students must complete eleven — eight required and three elec- 
tive — courses to major in communication. While the department wiU 
transfer communication electives, the eight required classes must be 
taken at Boston College. The requirements for the major are as follows: 

Common Requirements (4): 

• CO 010 The Rhetorical Tradition 

• CO 020 Survey of Mass Communication 
CO 030 Public Speaking 

• CO 350 Research Methods 
Distributed Requirements (4): 

• Cluster Area Requirements — Choose one of the following 
courses: CO 105 Interpersonal Communication, CO 249 
Communication Law, CO 250 Mass Communication Ethics, 
CO 251 Gender and Media, CO 255 Media Aesthetics, and 
CO 263 Media, Law and Society 

• Theory Requirement — Choose one of the following courses: 
CO 372 Mass Communication Theory, CO 375 
Argumentation Theory, CO 377 Visual Communication 
Theory, and CO 378 Rhetorical Theory 

• Writing-Intensive Seminars (2) Choose two of the following 
courses: CO 425 Broadcast Century Issues, CO 426 
Television and Society, CO 429 Globalization and the Media, 
CO 440 Communication and Theology, CO 441 Men, 
Women and Popular Culture, CO 442 Intercultural 
Communication, CO 443 Ethical Considerations in the Mass 
Communication, CO 445 Freedom of Expression, CO 447 
Communication Criticism, CO 448 Television Criticism, CO 
449 Crisis Communication, CO 451 Gender Roles and 
Communication, CO 452 Political and Social 
Communication, CO 456 Relational Communication, CO 
458 Radio in Culture and Society, CO 460 Seminar: Fiction, 
Film and Video, and CO 470 Capstone: Conflict, Decision 
and Communication 



Electives (3) 

The other three courses are electives and students may select these 
courses based upon their interests and objectives. Any three-hour class 
offered by the department can be counted as an elective, including CO 
520 Media Workshop and CO 592 Honors Thesis. Most majors will 
develop areas of expertise by concentrating their elective courses in a 
particular area of study such as television or public relations. 
Information for First Year Majors 

Freshmen and sophomores can declare the Communication 
major in Lyons 215B. Juniors and seniors should schedule an appoint- 
ment with the department's counselor to determine whether they can 
reasonably complete the required course work prior to graduation. 

CO 010 Rhetorical Tradition and CO 020 Survey of Mass 
Communication are prerequisites for all other communication 
courses. Majors should not register for theory courses, writing-inten- 
sive seminars, or any electives until they have completed both 
Rhetorical Tradition and Survey of Mass Communication. 
Information for Study Abroad 

Students must complete seven communication courses by the 
end of their junior year to receive department permission to study 
abroad. Among the seven courses, students must have completed 
CO 010 Rhetorical Tradition, CO 020 Survey of Mass 
Communication, and CO 030 Public Speaking. The seven course 
requirement can be met by any one the following: 

• taking seven communication courses at Boston College 

• counting communication courses and approved summer 
school courses 

• taking five communication courses at Boston College and trans- 
ferring two courses from the junior year abroad placement 

For additional information and departmental approval contact 
the department's counselor. 
Internship Program 

CO 520 Communication Internship, a one credit pass/fail 
course, is open to Communication majors who have junior or senior 
standing and a minimum 2.5 grade point average. 

CO 590 Media Workshop, a three credit course, is open to 
communication majors who have senior standing and a 3.0 grade 
point average (or a 2.8 overall with a 3.2+ in the major). In addition, 
potential interns must have completed a minimum of six courses in 
Communication including CO 010 Rhetorical Tradition, CO 020 
Survey of Mass Communication and CO 030 Pubhc Speaking, and 
appropriate preparatory course work necessary for the specific field 
placement. 
Honors Program 

Juniors with an overall grade point average of 3.5 or higher are 
eligible for the program. To complete the honors program, students 
will need to take two specified "honors" writing intensive seminars, 
perform well in those courses (receive grades of A or A-), and suc- 
cessfully complete an honors thesis under the direction of the 
instructor of one of those courses. Honors students will receive a 
total of nine credit hours for their participation in, and completion 
of, the program. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
CO 010 The Rhetorical Tradition (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Required course for all Communication majors 

This is an introductory course that is designed to examine the 
classical periods of rhetoric as well as during the Enlightenment and 
modern periods. The course focuses on pivotal concepts in rhetoric 
and their application to contemporary discourse. This is a founda- 



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tion course in the field of communication. It introduces students to 
perennial issues and concerns in rhetoric, and looks at communica- 
tion as a way of knowing about self and society. 
Bonnie Jefferson 

CO 020 Survey of Mass Communication (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Required course for all Communication majors 

This is a survey course in mass communication. It explores the 
political, social, and cultural forces that have influenced the devel- 
opment of the media. Among the topics discussed are media histo- 
ry, governmental regulation of the media, media economics, the 
impact of mass media on society, and the organizational decision- 
making process within the media institutions. 
Dana Mastro 

CO 030 Public Speaking (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Required course for all Communication majors 

This course is an introduction to the theory, composition, deliv- 
ery, and criticism of speeches. Attention is devoted to the four key ele- 
ments of the speech situation: message, speaker, audience, and occa- 
sion. Emphasis in the course is also given to different modes of speak- 
ing and a variety of speech types, such as persuasive, ceremonial, and 
expository addresses. This is a performance course. 
The Department 

CO 104 Interpersonal Communication (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course focuses on theory and research concerning com- 
munication in everyday interactions. First, the course includes per- 
spectives on the self as it is influenced by and influences communi- 
cation. Second, the basic aspects of message production and under- 
standing will be discussed. Lastly, the course focuses on communi- 
cation in relational contexts. Students in the course are encouraged 
to evaluate their own communication practices and practice effective 
communication skills. 
Pamela Lannutti 
CO 105 Elements of Debate (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course introduces the student to the theory and practice of 
debate. It is designed for students without any formal training in 
debate. Assignments include participation in three class debates, 
preparation of affirmative and negative arguments, and compilation 
of an evidence file and annotated bibliography on the debate topic. A 
comprehensive final examination covering class lectures will be given. 
Stefan Bauschard 

CO 120 Blacks in Electronic Media (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with BK 234 

See course description in the Black Studies Department. 
Lawrence Watson 

CO 204 Art and Digital Technology (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Cross listed with FS 276 

See course description in the Fine Arts Department. 
Karl Baden 
CO 220 Radio Operations and Production (Spring: 3) 

This course is designed to present an overview of basic audio 
theory, programming and production techniques, station operations 
and radio's relationship to the public and government. Students 
must meet for a one-hour lab period each week in addition to the 
two-hour lecture periods. 
Michael Keith 

CO 222 Studio Television Production (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: CO 227 

This course is designed to introduce students to the tools and 
techniques of television production. Attention is given to the plan- 



ning and production skills necessary for effective communication in 

television. To pursue these goals, a substantial portion of the course 

will be devoted to learning production in a television studio. 

Don Larick 

Paul Reynolds 

William Stanwood 

CO 223 TV Field Production (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: CO 222 

This course is designed to develop the skills and disciplines of 
Electronic Field Production (EFP). The majority of programs pro- 
duced in the video industry today utilize the EFP system. Emphasis 
will be placed on advanced techniques of portable video camera 
operation and traditional videotape editing. Elements of production 
such as location, sound recording, location lighting, scripting, pro- 
ducing, and directing will be featured. Working both individually 
and in groups, students will produce their own video programs. The 
course will also explore new technologies in video production such 
as non-linear editing and digital video. 
David Corkum 
Paul Reynolds 
William Stanwood 

CO 224 Digital Nonlinear Editing (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Cross listed with FS 274 

See course description in the Fine Arts Department. 
Adam Bush 
James Ferguson 
Carl Schmidt 
CO 225 Broadcast Management and Sales (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course will examine and evaluate the various management 
styles and time sales practices found in the radio, television, and 
cable industries. The responsibilities and duties of the broadcast 
manager and the marketing strategies and techniques employed by 
the station sales department will be surveyed and considered within 
the context of the rapidly emerging information superhighway and 
the projected 500 channel universe, which shall further intensify the 
competition prevalent in the electronic media field. 
Larry Miller 
CO 227 Broadcast Writing (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course introduces the student to a broad sampling of 
broadcast writing styles. Areas of focus will include news, sports, 
documentaries, commercials and public service announcements, 
educational television, and writing for specialized audiences. A spe- 
cial emphasis will be placed on dramatic and comedy writing in the 
last third of this course. 
James Dunford 
Christine Caswell McCarron 
William Stanwood 
CO 230 News Writing (Fall/Spring: 3) 

An introduction to reporting for the print media, this course 
examines (1) techniques of interviewing and observation, (2) the 
news value of events, and (3) the organizational forms and writing 
styles used by newspapers. Students will be expected to read a news- 
paper daily. 
Joe Bergantino 
Jack Lzzo, S.J. 

CO 231 Feature Writing (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: CO 230 

This is a course on contemporary feature writing: literary non- 
fiction journalistic writing based on solid reporting. The course's 
emphasis is on writing — writing stories editors will want to print 



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and readers will want to read. The course will include reading and 
analyzing well-written newspaper and magazine articles. Students 
will learn to apply the techniques of drama and fiction to writing 
objective factual stories that entertain as well as inform. The course 
focuses on newspaper features and magazine articles, but the tech- 
niques are applicable to writing nonfiction books. 
Jack Izzo, S.J. 
Jon Marcus 
Jody Olsen Agmz 

CO 233 Advanced Journalism: Presenting the News (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: CO 227, CO 230, or CO 231 

This course will examine how an editorial staff produces a 
newspaper. The focus will be on the roles of reporters, columnists, 
editorial writers, editors, photographers, and graphic designers in the 
daily process as decisions are made as to what stories to cover, what 
stories and photographs to publish (and not to publish), and on 
what page to display them. The function of the various sub-sections 
in the newsroom structure — Business, Arts, Sports, Lifestyle, and 
Magazine — will be discussed as will the role of the business office 
where it intersects with the management of the newsroom. 
Thomas Mulvoy 
CO 235 Introduction to Advertising (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course explores advertising as an institution in society, 
both as a marketing tool and as a communication process. Designed 
as a comprehensive view of the subject, the course includes such top- 
ics as advertising history, regulation, communication theory and 
practice, the role of advertising in the marketing mix, the organiza- 
tion of the advertising agency, marketing/advertising research, and 
the creative uses of various advertising media. Students will monitor 
advertising in various media, assess strategy, and participate in the 
formulation of an advertising campaign plan. 
William Ebhen 
John Kiley 
Peter Woloschuk 

CO 236 Advertising Copy and Layout (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: CO 235 or marketing course equivalent 

This course is designed to promote an understanding of what 
constitutes effective creative work in advertising through the study 
and production of advertisements in a variety of media, including 
newspapers, magazines, direct mail catalogs, web page, and out-of- 
home vehicles. Students will produce individual advertisements, cri- 
tique their own and others' work, and develop a final strategic cre- 
ative campaign utilizing theory and design research discussed in 
class. Enrollment is limited. 
Ann Marie Barry 
CO 240 Introduction to Public Relations (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course is designed to be an examination of the technical, 
counseling, and planning elements in public relations. Attention in 
the course will focus on public relations campaigns, non-profit pub- 
lic relations, and the often complex relationship between manage- 
ment strategies and promotional objectives. Emphasis also will be 
placed on developing proper writing techniques for public relations. 
Included among the writing assignments will be a press release, plan- 
ning statement, contact sheet, and a press kit. 
Patricia Delaney 
Ann Lootens-Kraus 
Alison Mills 
Jody Olsen Agraz 
Doug Quintal 



CO 245 Advanced Public Relations (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: CO 240 

This course is designed for students who have completed CO 
240 and are considering public relations as a profession. Emphasis 
will be on writing (press releases, query letters, profiles, press kits), 
speaking (oral presentations and on-camera press encounters), and 
strategizing (developing proactive and reactive media strategies for 
specific case studies). 
John Dunn 
CO 249 Communication Law (Fall: 3) 

This course examines major principles and trends in commu- 
nication law. The course analyzes a wide-range of issues related to the 
First Amendment, intellectual property, and broadcast regulation. 
Special emphasis will be placed on access, blasphemy and obscenity, 
broadcasting, cable regulation, commercial speech, defamation, free 
press/fair trial, institutional constraints, intellectual property, prior 
restraints, privacy, sedition, time/place/manner restrictions, and 
words that wound. 
Dale Herbeck 

CO 251 Gender and Media (Fall: 3) 

This course examines the representation of gender in the U.S. 
media, focusing primarily on television and film genres such as the 
situation comedy, soap opera, talk show, action film, thriller, and the 
"women's" film. 
Lisa Cuklanz 
CO 259 Cyberlaw (Spring: 3) 

This course will study the extension of communication law to 
the Internet, assess a range of pending proposals for new laws 
designed to regulate free speech in cyberspace, and discuss a variety 
of national and international schemes intended to govern the devel- 
oping global information infrastructure. In the process, the course 
will consider issues involving political speech, sexually explicit 
expression, defamation, privacy, intellectual property, commercial 
speech and spam, schools and libraries, and international issues. 
Dale Herbeck 

CO 263 Media, Law, and Society (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: CO 010 Rhetorical Tradition and CO 020 Survey of 
Mass Communication 

This course is designed to examine the interaction among new 
forms of technology, the legal system, and the changing nature of 
society. The course seeks to explore the contours of the "Information 
Society" and to analyze the transformations that are occurring as the 
word "communication" takes on a broader meaning than it pos- 
sessed during the twentieth century. Among the topics explored in 
the course are intellectual property, selling and licensing digital 
property, the emergence of a digital economy, and the changing legal 
rules necessary to govern the "Information Society." 
Donald Fishman 

CO 270 Linguistics and Communication (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with SL 28 1 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
M.J. Connolly 
CO 280 Broadcast Programming and Promotion (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course focuses on the complexities of programming mod- 
ern-day commercial television and radio stations and of promoting 
these programs to reach the most desirable demographics. Case stud- 
ies of television station and network programming will be analyzed 
and discussed, and techniques of both programming and promotion 
will be studied. 
James Dunford 



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CO 285 Cultural Diversity in Media (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

In an age where the world's political borders are changing rapid- 
ly, cultural artifacts found in mass communication become increas- 
ingly important. This course examines the relationship of culture and 
the mass media in creating a new concept of America, based on race, 
ethnicity and gender From this exploration, students will be able to 
critique the impact of television, radio, film, cartoons, newspapers, 
magazines, books and the music industry on cultural perception. 
Marilyn Matelski 
CO 296 Internet and Society (Fall/Spring: 3) 

The course begins with a discussion of the Internet as both a 
technological and cultural phenomenon. The course continues to 
investigate how the seemingly anarchic and chaotic network of com- 
puters, texts, and hypertextual links is, in fact, increasingly regulat- 
ed by on-line communities, various levels of government, and the 
computer and Internet industries. Finally, the course concludes with 
a series of case studies that illuminate ongoing social and political 
debates about the future of the Internet in American society. 
Greg Elmer 
CO 298 World Wide Web and Digital Media (Fall/Spring: 3) 

The World Wide Web (WWW), which started only after 1991, 
has already become one of the indispensable communication tools in 
contemporary society. Students will be introduced to basics of the 
WWW so that they can (1) browse Web pages, (2) search any nec- 
essary information on the Internet, (3) set up one's own Web page, 
and (4) analyze Web pages for certain purposes. Theoretical and 
philosophical issues regarding the WWW will also be explored. 
Robert Herbstzuher 
Scott Kinder 
David Mclntyre 
Barbara Restaino 

CO 300 Advanced Advertising (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor plus CO 235, CO 236, and 
CO 377. 

Utilizing integrated marketing communication principles, stu- 
dents will prepare an advertising campaign for the American Advertising 
Federation's national competition. The course will augment students' 
abilities to coordinate, strategize, and execute a final campaign through 
collaborative critical analysis and creative structuring. 
Roger Woolsey 

CO 350 Communication Research Methods (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Required course for all Communication majors starting with Class 
of 2006 

This course will equip students with a veritable toolbox of 
methods for researching mass media and their audiences. We will 
look at how researchers have answered such questions as: How are 
people affected by mass media? What/who appears most frequently 
in the mass media? How do people make sense of the media mes- 
sages they consume? Both quantitative (content analysis, surveys, 
experiments) and qualitative (interviews, focus groups, textual analy- 
sis) methods will be explored. 
The Department 

CO 372 Mass Communication Theory (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies the required theory course in the Communication major 

This course will examine the underlying theories behind mass 
communication and the mass media and will apply those theories to 
operational decisions made by media executives on a day-to-day basis. 
Dana Mastro 
Marilyn Matelski 
Anne Sears 



CO 375 Argumentation Theory (Fall: 3) 

Satisfies the required theory course in the Communication major 

This course considers the theory of argumentation, in contrast to 
"Elements of Debate" which teaches students how to argue. 
Argumentation Theory begins by considering the nature of argumen- 
tation, proceeds to discuss the qualities of good argument, and con- 
cludes with a discussion of fields or communities or argumentation. 
Ekaterina Haskins 

CO 377 Visual Communication Theory (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies the required theory course in the Communication major 

This course explores the role of perception within visual learning, 
the nature of images, how public images function in political and cul- 
tural discourse, the psychology of the camera eye, differences among 
television, film and print images, and controversial media issues. 
Ann Marie Barry 

CO 378 Rhetorical Theory (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies the required theory course in the Communication major 

This course applies the concepts of critical rhetorical theory to 
the analysis of news media. Students select a contemporary event or 
problem in the news and develop a five-stage project culminating in 
a 20-25 page research paper. 
Roger Woolsey 

CO 400 Advanced Video Production (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor plus CO 227 Broadcast 
Writing, CO 222 Studio TV Production, and CO 223 TV Field 
Production. 

This course will enable you to hone the skills you learned in the 
Broadcast Writing, Studio Television Production, and Television 
Field Production courses. You will produce a real television program 
for a real client. The course will also explore how to create a program 
through real world experiences such as formulating a script to meet 
specific client needs and planning, shooting, and editing the finished 
show. All these steps will be accomplished with the approval of your 
clients. They will give you the "big yes" or the "big no " as to whether 
your finished product has succeeded or failed. 
William Stanwood 

CO 402 Digital Audio Production (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: CO 220 or permission of instructor 

This course is designed to introduce students to digital audio 
production. The course will include recording, editing, and post- 
production work, all using a computer-based audio system. Students 
will produce digital audio recordings of various lengths and master a 
work on compact disc. 
Jon Sage 
Lloyd Thayer 

CO 404 Advanced World Wide Web and Digital Media 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: CO 298 or equivalent experience and knowledge 

Today, most industries and organizations are not only manag- 
ing their Web sites, but more and more heavily relying on the Web 
and digital communications. This course is designed for students to 
get prepared for careers in this new digital media environment by 
equipping them with advanced skills and knowledge in the WWW 
and digital communications. 
Nicole Make 

CO 425 Broadcast Century Issues (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive courses required within the 
Communication major 

The impact of radio and television has been felt around the 
world. It has altered the way we think and behave. This course is an 



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assessment of the major issues and events that have helped form 

twentieth century broadcast media. Topics will be examined within 

the context of their relationship to society and culture. 

Michael Keith 

CO 426 TV and Society (Spring: 3) 

Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive courses required within the 

Communication major 

This writing-intensive course will provide a forum for investi- 
gating the role of television in our society. We will examine such top- 
ics as the use of violence on TV, the impact of television on public 
discourse, as well as other TV issues in our society. A variety of texts 
and research methods will be used to help draw conclusions about 
the impact of TV on our culture. 
William Stanwood 

CO 429 Globalization and the Media (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive courses required within the 
Communication major 

The course will question the cultural impact of globalization on 
both the traditional centers (Hollywood, New York, London, Paris, 
Hong Kong, Tokyo) and peripheries of media production (Central 
America, the Arctic, the Australian "outback," Africa, India, Eastern 
Europe, the Middle East and China). The course will touch on top- 
ics such as the shifting definitions of cultural imperialism, the role of 
the United Nations in regulating cultural programming, the debate 
over national and cultural protectionism, the globalization of news 
and information services, the globalization and commercialization of 
sports programming, and the proliferation of satellite and Internet 
technologies. 
Elfriede Fursich 

CO 441 Men, Women and Popular Culture (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive courses required within the 
Communication major 

This class explores how communication practices shape our 
conceptions of others and ourselves as gendered individuals. We will 
focus on how popular culture, in particular, ofl:en promotes our 
acceptance of various gender roles as normal and inherent. We will 
address masculinity and femininity in the context of television, fdm, 
music, music videos, novels, comic books, advertising, sports media, 
and WWW. Evaluating representations of men and women in pop- 
ular culture, and considering men and women as pop culture audi- 
ences, will be integral themes in this course. 
Susannah Stern 

CO 442 Intercultural and International Communication 

(Fall/Spring: 3) 

Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive courses required within the 

Communication major 

This course studies communication as it relates to culture, and 
as it occurs interculturally and internationally. In those contexts, 
questions and issues will be pursued which reveal processes, effects, 
methods, and critical norms for evaluating interpersonal, group, and 
mass communication. 
Vicki Karns 
Marilyn Matelski 
Xuejian Yu 
The Department 



CO 447 Communication Criticism (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Formerly Rhetorical Criticism 

Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive courses required within the 

Communication major 

This course examines a wide range of critical methodologies 
which can be used to reach a greater understanding of public com- 
munication. In addition to speech events, the impact of other com- 
munication media such as film, television, advertising, political car- 
toons, and music will be examined from a critical perspective. A 
greater understanding of the critical choices available allows us to 
better evaluate the impact of public communication. 
Ekaterina Haskins 
Bonnie Jefferson 

CO 448 Television Criticism (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive courses required within the 
Communication major 

This course provides students with methods for critically eval- 
uating the cultural and social impact of television. First, students 
learn some fundamentals of television production and the structure 
of the media industry. Based on this knowledge, students examine 
and practice the critical analysis of contemporary television pro- 
grams. The goal of the course is to make students more informed 
critics of our television-saturated age. 
Elfriede Fursich 
Anne Sears 

CO 449 Crisis Communication (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: It is recommended that students have completed CO 
240 Public Relations before enrolling in Crisis Communication. 
Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive courses required within the 
Communication major 

This course is designed to examine events and situations that 
potentially threaten the viability of an organization. Attention is 
devoted to developing an effective crisis communication plan, speak- 
ing to multiple stakeholders, decision-making under pressure, and 
resolving — rather than litigating — organizational problems. Among 
the studies examined are the Tylenol product tampering incident, 
the Exxon Valdez accident, the Union Carbide gas leak, the 
Challenger Space Shuttle disaster, the Three Mile Island accident, 
and the Pepsi syringe hoax. 
Donald Fishman 

CO 451 Gender Roles and Communication (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive course requirements within the 
Communication major. 

This course is both a writing-intensive seminar and a women's 
studies course. Focus is on the social construction of gender through 
communication. The early section of the course compares historical 
and cross-cultural notions of gender. Then, building on these com- 
parisons, students read about, examine, and analyze communication 
texts, focusing particularly on television programming and advertis- 
ing. Students are encouraged to develop a sense of themselves as 
active participants in the social construction of gender rather than as 
passive consumers and receivers of mass mediated communication. 
Lisa Cuklanz 



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CO 456 Relational Communication (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive courses required within the 

Communication major. 

This course examines communication in personal relationships 
with an emphasis on romantic relationships. We will explore the 
current relational communication literature following the basic 
model of initiation, maintenance, and deterioration. An emphasis is 
placed on identifying and understanding problematic situations and 
patterns in personal relationships. 
Pamela Lannutti 

CO 458 Radio in Culture and Society (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive courses required within the 
Communication major 

This course will seek to examine and analyze the role of broadcast 
radio in non-mainstream segments (minority, counterculture, extrem- 
ist, and alternative-lifestyle clusters) of the population. In the last quar- 
ter century, so-called "outerculture" or "fringe" groups have asserted 
their rights to a fair and equal access to the airwaves as a means for mol- 
lifying the negative perceptions and stereotypes that have prevented 
them from fully benefiting from citizenship in the worlds largest 
democracy. Students will gather research data for an extensive paper 
designed to probe and evaluate the effects and implications of bias and 
discrimination in American broadcast media, specifically radio. 
Michael C. Keith 

CO 470 Capstone: Conflict, Decision and Communicadon (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with UN 510 

Satisfies 1 of 2 writing intensive courses required within the 
Communication major 
For Seniors only 

This seminar focuses on inevitable questions which underlie most 
undergraduate study, and which form the basis for critical decision 
making throughout our lives in work, personal relationships, citizen- 
ship and spiritual development. Seminar discussion will focus on inner 
and outer conflicts in competitive relationships, gendered discourse, 
concepts of justice, freedom and responsibility, and spiritual awareness. 
Ann Marie Barry 

CO 485 Advanced Interctdtural: studyabroad.com (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: CO 442 or equivalent; enrolled in BC-sponsored inter- 
national program; permission of instructor 

For a complete description of the course and its assignments, check 
the website http://www2.bc.edu/-'matelski 

This is a web-based, advanced intercultural communication 
course intended for those studying abroad. Offered by "permission 
only," students allowed into this class are strongly recommended to 
have taken CO 442 or its equivalent as a prerequisite, and should be 
enrolled in a BC-sponsored international program. 
Marilyn J. Matelski 

CO 500 Debate Practicum (Fall/Spring: 1) 

Prerequisites: Successful completion of CO 105 Elements of Debate, 
participation on the intercollegiate debate team, and permission of 
the instructor. 

Advanced discussion of argumentation theory and debate prac- 
tice with an emphasis on contemporary intercollegiate debate. This 
is a one-credit course. 
John Katsulas 

CO 501 Communication Internship (Fall/Spring/Summer: 1) 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

This course is a one-credit pass/fail internship available for 
sophomore, junior, and senior Communication majors. See 
Internship Director for details. 
Woolsey 



CO 520 Media Workshop (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: (1) Senior standing, (2) 3.0 GPA or 2.8 overall and 3.2 

in major, (3) completion of six courses in communication at BC, 

including those required for the major, and (4) permission of the 

instructor 

This course may not be repeated. 

By arrangement. 

This course gives senior communication majors an opportuni- 
ty to pursue a partial internship in the electronic or print media. 
Practical experience will be supplemented by discussions of relevant 
theoretical constructs. Adherence to professional protocol is expect- 
ed. A field research paper is required. 
Roger Woolsey 
CO 592 Honors Thesis (Fall/Spring: 3) 

A research course under the guidance of a faculty member for 
those writing an Honors Thesis. 
The Department 
CO 593 Advanced Topics (Spring: 3) 

This course is an advanced seminar restricted to second-semes- 
ter senior women's studies minors. Enrollment is by permission only. 
Lisa Cuklanz 

CO 597 Readings and Research — Communications (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 
This course may be repeated. 

This course is intended to provide an opportunity for students 
to explore topics not currently covered in the curriculum. Students 
will work on a specific research project under the supervision of a 
faculty member. The defining characteristics of the course are that 
(1) it must involve extensive readings, and (2) it must include a for- 
mal term paper of twenty or more pages. 
The Department 

CO 598 Teaching Assistantship (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor 

This course is intended to provide undergraduate students with 
teaching experience. Students assist a professor in planning and 
implementing various aspects of a course. Open only to seniors and 
enrollment is limited to one student per professor. 
The Department 

CO 599 Advanced Independent Research (Fall/Spring: 6) 
Formerly known as Scholar of the College 
Donald Fishman 
The Department 

Computer Science 
Departmental Notes 

• Department Secretary: Jane Costello, 617-552-3975, 
jane.costello@bc.edu 

• World Wide Web: http://www.cs.bc.edu 

Undergraduate Program Description 

The Computer Science Department offers programs in both the 
College of Arts and Sciences and the Carroll School of Management. 
This section describes only the programs in Arts and Sciences; con- 
sult the Computer Science listing under the Carroll School of 
Management for a description of the management programs in 
Computer Science and Information Systems and for the list of 
Computer Science faculty. For further information you are encour- 
aged to contact the department in Fulton 460, at 617-552-3975. 
The Major Program 

The curriculum for the major in Computer Science is based 
upon current recommendations offered by the Association for 
Computing Machinery (ACM) for liberal arts institutions. The pro- 



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gram is designed to provide a solid foundation in the fundamentals 
of computer science. At the same time, it provides practical, hands- 
on experience, as the current technological job market dictates. 

Students complete a ten-course computer science component, 
supplemented by a mathematics component rooted in Calculus and 
Discrete Mathematics. For most students, the program requires 
completion of thirteen courses. 
Computer Science Component 

For the class of 2004 and later, the ten computer science 
courses required for completion of the major are grouped into two 
categories, six required core courses and four electives. The six 
required core courses are the following: 

Computer Science I (MC 101 OR MC140 but not both) 
Computer Science II (MC 102 OR MC 141 but not both) 
Computer Science III (MC 103 OR MC 697 credit for MC 
697 and MC 101/MC 102 will not be granted) 

• Computer Organization and Assembly Language (MC 160) 

• Algorithms (MC 383) 

• Theory of Computation (MC 385) 

Of the four electives, at least three must be numbered 300 and 
above, and must include at least two of the following three courses: 
Operating Systems (MC 362), Computer Networks (MC 363), and 
Principles of Programming Languages (MC 366). The fourth elec- 
tive may be any MC course numbered 200 and above. 

For classes prior to the class of 2004, the ten computer sci- 
ence courses required for completion of the major are grouped into 
two categories, five required core courses and five electives. The five 
required core courses are the following: 

• Computer Science I (MC 140) 

• Computer Science II (MC 141) 

• Computer Organization and Assembly Language (MC 160) 

• Algorithms (MC 383) 

• Theory of Computation (MC 385) 

Of the five electives, at least four must be numbered 300 and 
above, and must include at least two of the following three courses: 
Operating Systems (MC 362), Computer Networks (MC 363), and 
Principles of Programming Languages (MC 366). 

The fifth elective may be any MC course numbered 200 and 
above. 
Mathematics Component 

At least two mathematics courses are required for completion 
of the major: one semester of Calculus at the level of Calculus II or 
higher and one semester of discrete mathematics. Students will ordi- 
narily complete the calculus requirement with any one of the fol- 
lowing courses: MT 101, MT 103, MT 200, MT 201, or MT 202. 
Realistically, most students will necessarily complete a prerequisite 
calculus course (e.g., MT 100 before MT 101, or MT 102 before 
MT 103), so this calculus requirement will usually be met by 
enrolling in a two-semester sequence. 

Students must complete the discrete mathematics requirement 
with the one semester course Discrete Mathematics (MT 245 or MC 
248). Double majors in Mathematics may satisfy the discrete math- 
ematics requirement by taking MT 445. It is especially important 
that Discrete Mathematics be completed no later than the end of 
junior year, since this material is prerequisite for the two required 
courses, Algorithms and Theory of Computation. 
Preparation for Graduate School 

Students considering graduate school should be aware that the 
Computer Science GRE usually needs to be taken by the fall of their 
senior year. Consequently, the following courses, which cover mater- 
ial used heavily in the GRE, should be taken by the end of the junior 



year: Computer Organization (MC 160), Discrete Math (MT 245 or 
MC 248), Algorithms (MC 383), Theory (MC 385), and Principles 
of Programming Languages (MC 366). In addition, the following 
courses are also strongly recommended: Operating Systems (MC 
362), Networks (MC 363), and Architecture (MC 372). 
Information for First Year Majors and Non-Majors 

The Computer Science major is for students who enjoy using 
computers and who wish to gain a deeper understand of computing 
technology. The major is designed to provide a solid foundation in 
the fundamentals of computer science. At the same time, it provides 
practical, hands-on experience, as the current technological job mar- 
ket dictates. Students are prepared for a variety of careers such as 
sofi^vare development, network administration, technical support 
and systems analysis. In addition, knowledge of computing technol- 
ogy is becoming increasingly important for people entering business, 
law, and the health care fields. 
Freshman Computer Science Majors 

First year students considering majoring in Computer Science 
should plan to complete the program's Calculus requirement (MT 
1 1 or higher) during freshman year. Most will enroll in MT 1 00 in 
fall semester and continue to MT 101 in spring semester. Students 
who either carry advanced mathematics placement, or who have 
completed a year of Calculus in high school, should enroll directly 
in MT 101 (or a more advanced course) in the fall semester. First 
year students wishing to double major in Computer Science and 
Mathematics should take the calculus sequence recommended for 
the mathematics major. 

Freshmen with some prior programming experience or strong 
technical skills are encouraged to take Computer Science I (MC 101 
or MC 140 but not both) their first semester. Those students who 
have had no programming experience may consider beginning with 
an introductory computer course (e.g., MC 074) in their first year. 
First year students who have achieved a score of 4 or higher on the 
Computer Science AP Examination, or students entering with sig- 
nificant programming backgrounds, should speak with the 
Computer Science Chairperson about proper course placement 
(e.g., directly taking MC 102). 
Freshman Non-Majors 

The department offers three introductory courses in computer 
science: MC 021, MC 074, and MC 101. MC 021 is designed to 
teach students how to use computers effectively in a business setting. 
Students learn to use a variety of application packages including 
spreadsheets, database systems, and the Internet. This course is 
required for all students in the Carroll School of Management, but 
it is also a popular elective with A&S students who want business 
computer skills. 

MC 074 is a gentle survey of computer science, intended for 
A&S students who know little to nothing about computing. It is an 
excellent course both for becoming more computer literate and as a 
preparation for the MC 101 course. 

MC 101 is the introductory programming course. It is required 
of all Computer Science majors and minors (class of 2004 and later) 
and is a prerequisite for all advanced Computer Science courses. 
Therefore, students who wish to take more than one course in com- 
puter science will need to take MC 101 sometime. The skills need- 
ed to write computer programs come easily to some people and less 
easily to others. Students who have little or no programming experi- 
ence and are apprehensive about their ability should consider 
enrolling in MC 074 before enrolling in MC 101. 



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The Minor Program 

The minor program in Computer Science is designed to provide 
an introduction to computer science, primarily for Mathematics and 
science majors. It is also suitable for students with a strong secondary 
interest in Computer Science and good analytical skills. 

Six courses are required for completion of the minor, according 
to the following two requirement categories: 

Three Required Core Courses: Computer Science I (MC 101 OR 
MC 140 but not both), Computer Science II (MC 102 ORMC 141 
but not both), and Computer Organization and Assembly Language 
(MC 160). 

Three Elective Courses: Chosen from the range MC 200-699, 
excluding the three required courses, and with at least one of these 
numbered 300 and above. 
Departmental Honors 

The department offers to qualified Computer Science majors 
the opportunity to graduate with Department Honors. The require- 
ments are as follows: 

• Completion of the Computer Science major as outlined above. 

• A grade point average at least 3.0 in MC courses. 

• MC 397 (Honors Thesis), which is taken in both the fall and 
spring of the senior year Thus, this requirement increases the 
number of MC courses by two. 

• A written thesis and the presentation of the final results of the 
thesis. 

Course Information 

All Computer Science courses have the prefix MC. However, 
because the department serves both the Carroll School of 
Management and the College of Arts and Sciences, some courses are 
primarily management-oriented and are considered to be CSOM 
courses, whereas others are considered to be A&S courses. In partic- 
ular, MC 021 and all 200-level courses are CSOM-credit courses; 
MC 074, all 100-level courses and all courses numbered 300-699 are 
A&S-credit courses. 

Introductory courses (e.g., MC 101, 102, and 160) are avail- 
able every semester All courses that are required for the major are 
offered at least once each academic year. Most advanced electives are 
offered only in alternate years; hence, student schedules should be 
designed carefully. 

Economics 

Faculty 

James E. Anderson, Professor; A.B., Oberlin College; Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin 

Richajd J. Arnott, Professor; B.S., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Jushan Bai, Professor; B.S., Nankai University, Tianjin, China; 

M.A., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., University of 

California, Berkeley 

David A. Belsley, Professor; K.^., Haverford College; Ph.D., 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Donald Cox, Professor; B.S., Boston College; M.S., Ph.D., Brown 

University 

Frank M. Gollop, Professor; A.B., University of Santa Clara; A.M., 

Ph.D., Harvard University 

Peter T. Gottschalk, Professor; B.A., M.A., George Washington 

University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Peter N. Ireland, Professor; Chairperson of the Department; B.A., 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Marvin C. Kraus, Professor; B.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., 

University of Minnesota 



Arthur Lewbel, Professor; B.S., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 

Paul McNeills, Gasson Professor; B.A., Boston College; M.Div., 

Weston School of Theology; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

William B. Neenan, S.J., Professor and Vice President; A.B., A.M., 

S.T.L., St. Louis University; Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Joseph F. Quinn Professor and Dean; A.B., Amherst College; 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Fabio Schiantarelli, Professor; B.S., Universita Bocconi, Italy; 

M.S., Ph.D., London School of Economics 

Uzi Segal, Professor; B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Hebrew University, Israel 

Christopher F. Baum, Associate Professor; A.B., Kalamazoo 

College; A.M., Florida Atlantic University; Ph.D., University of 

Michigan 

Hideo Konishi, Associate Professor; B.A., Kyoto University, Japan; 

M.A., Osaka University, Japan; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Rochester 

Douglas Marcouiller, S.J., Associate Professor; A.B., Princeton 

University; M.A., Yale University; M. Div., Weston School of 

Theology; Ph.D., University of Texas, Austin 

Francis M. McLaughlin, Associate Professor; Assistant Chairperson 

of the Department; B.S., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Robert G. Murphy, Associate Professor; B.A., Williams College; 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Harold A. Petersen, Associate Professor; A.B., DePauw University; 

Ph.D., Brown University 

Richard W. Tresch, Associate Professor; A.B., Williams College; 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Ingela Alger, Assistant Professor; M.S.C., Stockholm School of 

Economics, Sweden; Ph.D., Universite de Toulouse, France 

Fabio Gmiooi, Assistant Professor; M.A., Universita Bocconi, Italy; 

Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Istvan Konya, Assistant Professor; B.S., Budapest University of 

Economics; M.A., Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Tommaso yiaoAC^v, Assistant Professor; B.A., Universita Bocconi, 

Italy; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Catherine G. Schneider, Senior Lecturer; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Departmental Notes 

• Administrative Secretary: Kathy Tubman, 617-552-3670 
(tubman@bc.edu) 

• Administrative Graduate Secretary: Mary Foley, 
617-552-3683 (foleym@bc.edu) 

• Technical Word Processor: John Moore, 617-552-3684 
(john.moore.5@bc.edu) 

• World Wide Web: http://fmwww.bc.edu/EC/EC.html 

Undergraduate Program. Description 

The Economics program provides a critical examination of how 
the economic system works in the United States and throughout the 
world. The introductory courses (EC 131-1 32) are surveys of eco- 
nomic problems, policies, and theory, and the required courses in 
micro theory and macro theory (EC 201-202) give a deeper analyti- 
cal foundation. Electives permit further study in a wide range of 
fields, including money and banking, international trade and finance, 
public sector economics, economic development, capital theory and 
finance, labor economics, industrial organization, health economics, 
environmental economics, law and economics, and econometrics. 

The Economics major provides a general background that is 
useful to those planning careers in law, government service, or busi- 
ness as well as those planning careers as professional economists. 



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Professional economists work as college teachers, as researchers for 
government agencies, businesses and consulting firms, and as 
administrators and managers in a wide range of fields. 
The Core 

Principles of Economics — Micro and Macro (EC 131 and EC 
132, respectively) — satisfy the Core requirements in the social sci- 
ences. These are distinct one-semester courses that should be taken in 
numerical order — Micro before Macro, although Macro can be taken 
first if necessary. It is possible to take only one of these courses, but 
the department strongly recommends a year of Principles for a well- 
rounded introduction to the U.S. economy and current policy issues. 
Major Requirements 

Ten three-credit courses are required for the major: Principles 
of Economics (EC 131-132), Economic Statistics (EC 151, 155 or 
157), Microeconomic Theory (EC 201 or 203), Macroeconomic 
Theory (EC 202 or 204), and any five electives numbered from EC 
200 and above. Students should take both EC 131 and EC 132 
before taking any other economics courses. The one exception is 
Statistics (EC 151, 155, and 157). Students normally take EC 131 
before EC 132, although EC 132 may be taken first. Students tak- 
ing Principles freshman year would usually take Micro Theory, 
Macro Theory, and one elective sophomore year. 

Students taking Principles sophomore year would generally 
take Micro Theory, Macro Theory, and two electives junior year. 
Statistics should be taken as soon as possible, certainly no later than 
sophomore year. The Economics major is meant to be structured. 
Students should take Principles, Statistics, and preferably the two 
Theory courses before beginning the 300-level electives. We recog- 
nize that late starters may not have time to follow this sequence pre- 
cisely, but at very least the 300-level electives and the corresponding 
theory courses should be taken concurrently. Consult the individual 
professor if you are unsure of your preparation. 

Economic electives are taught in two formats: the traditional 
lecture format, with enrollments up to 40, and a smaller writing- 
intensive format, with enrollments capped at 15 to 25, depending 
on the size of the writing component. 

Students are urged to take advantage of the writing-intensive 
courses, and to check with the department before the registration 
period to learn which courses will be offered in which format. 

Knowledge of the basic elements of calculus is required of all 
Economics majors. No specific calculus courses are required for the 
major, but all majors should know how to take derivatives of simple 
functions and to solve maximum and minimum problems. MT 100, 
and many high school calculus courses provide the basic elements of 
calculus needed for the Economics major. The Micro and Macro 
Theory courses and the 300-level electives may use some basic ele- 
ments of calculus. Any student with a serious interest in economics 
should take at least one full year of Calculus, MT 100-101, or the 
equivalent; additional math courses are strongly recommended for 
students considering graduate work in economics. 
Honors Program 

The Honors Program presents highly motivated Economics 
majors with opportunities for more individualized and challenging 
training in economics. Entrance to the program is ideally in the 
sophomore year, when students with good Principles grades will be 
urged to consider the Honors Theory sequence (EC 203-204) in 
place of the standard theory sequence (EC 201-202). However, stu- 
dents who have already completed EC 201-202 may still be accepted 
into the Honors Program. Students considering the Honors Program 
should arrange to take Statistics (preferably EC 157) as soon as pos- 
sible and Econometric Methods (EC 228) immediately following. 



Note that EC 228 has a calculus prerequisite. MT 100-101 or their 
equivalents are prerequisites for both Econometrics and the Honors 
Program generally. The honors candidate must complete a six-credit 
Honors Thesis (EC 497-498) in the senior year under the direction 
of a faculty member. Also, four elective courses numbered from EC 
200 and above are required during the junior and senior years (not 
counting the two Senior Thesis or Scholar's Project courses). 
Minor Requirements 

The following courses are required for the minor in Economics: 

EC 131 Principles of Economics — Micro 

EC 132 Principles of Economics-Macro 

EC 151 Statistics 

EC 201 Microeconomic Theory 

EC 202 Macroeconomic Theory 

Plus any two electives with numbers of EC 200 and higher. 

Students may substitute: 

• EC 157 Statistics — Honors for EC 151 Statistics 

• EC 203 Micro Theory — Honors for EC 201 Microeconomic 
Theory 

• EC 204 Macro Theory — Honors for EC 202 Macroeconomic 
Theory 

Finally, students should know the basics of calculus for the the- 
ory courses (EC 201-EC 202) and for some electives. MT 100 
would meet this prerequisite, as would a high school calculus course. 
Double Majors 

Requirements for double majors are the same as for the major: 
Ten courses (30 credits) in Economics, including Principles, 
Statistics, Micro Theory, and Macro Theory, are required of a dou- 
ble major. 
Economics Internship 

EC 1 99 Economics Internship is available for any student who 
wishes to do an internship with an agency or organization that 
requires a Boston College connection as a condition for offering the 
internship opportunity. A student who wishes to enroll in EC 1 99 is 
required to complete an approval form which can be obtained in the 
Dean's Office of Arts and Sciences. The form must be signed by the 
student's supervisor in the organization or agency providing the 
internship and also by Professor Francis McLaughlin, Carney 130. 
After it is signed it should be sent to the student's class dean. At the 
end of the internship the agency supervisor must provide an evalua- 
tion to Professor McLaughlin. The internship will be graded on a 
pass/fail basis. Internship credit does not reduce any other course 
credit required for completing the major or for graduation. 
CSOM-Economics Concentration 

All Carroll School of Management students, regardless of their 
area of concentration, are required to take Principles of Economics 
(EC 131-132) and Statistics (EC 151 or 155). In addition, students 
from the Carroll School of Management may choose economics as 
an area of concentration. The concentration consists of four courses 
beyond the three required courses: Microeconomic Theory (EC 201 
or 203), Macroeconomic Theory (EC 202 or 204), and any two 
electives. Students with a serious interest in economics, however, are 
urged to take at least ten courses, the equivalent of an Arts and 
Sciences major. 
Information for Study Abroad 

The department wishes to insure that students are able to com- 
plete the minimum requirements for the major in time for gradua- 
tion. It prefers students to have 5 courses complete before studying 
abroad: Micro and Macro Principles, Statistics, and Micro and 
Macro Theory. In addition, those students planning to participate in 
the Departmental Honors Program are strongly advised to identify a 



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thesis topic and a faculty supervisor before going abroad; very tight 
deadhnes during the fall semester of senior year make this advance 
planning essential. 

Up to 2 of the 5 electives that are required for the Arts and 
Sciences Economics major may be taken abroad. CSOM economics 
majors and Economics minors are limited to counting one elective 
from abroad towards their degree requirements. It is important to 
note that the 2 theory courses, Micro and Macro Theory, must be 
done at BC. 

There are many good economics programs offered through 
universities overseas; students are encouraged to ask their faculty 
advisors for details about the quality of various programs. Schools 
with particularly strong reputations in economics include the 
London School of Economics, University College London, and 
Queen Mary and Westfield in the United Kingdom; Trinity College 
Dublin in Ireland; Pompeu Fabra, Madrid Autonoma, and Madrid 
Computense in Spain; University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands; 
University of Parma in Italy; and Melbourne University in Australia. 

Students must contact Peter Ireland, Chairperson, to plan their 
semester or year abroad. Students who are considering doing Ph.D. 
work in economics should think ahead, and plan their programs 
abroad with particular care. 

Graduate Program Description 

The graduate program in economics is oriented primarily 
toward full-time students who are seeking a Ph.D. A limited num- 
ber of students are also accepted to the M.A. program, which may 
be undertaken on either a part-time or full-time basis. 
Ph.D. Program 

The Ph.D. program is designed to train economists for careers 
in teaching and research by providing strong backgrounds in eco- 
nomic theory, quantitative research methods, and applied fields. 
Requirements include course work, comprehensive examinations, a 
thesis, and a one-year residence requirement. 

The course requirements consist of a first-year core curriculum 
and eight electives. The first-year program consists of core courses in 
microtheory (EC 740, 741), macrotheory (EC 750, 751), mathe- 
matics for economists (EC 720), statistics (EC 770) and economet- 
rics (EC 771). The second year is devoted to electives. In addition to 
the department's own electives, students may take courses in the 
Carroll School of Management's Ph.D. program in Finance. 

Students are required to pass written comprehensive examina- 
tions in microtheory, macrotheory, and in two of the following 
fields: econometric theory, applied econometrics, monetary eco- 
nomics, international trade and finance, international trade and 
development, industrial organization, public sector economics, labor 
economics, urban economics, and finance. Each exam is based on a 
two-course sequence on the subject matter. The micro and macro 
comprehensives are offered twice a year in late May and late August. 
Students generally take them immediately after the first year and 
begin to write field comprehensives at the end of the second year. 
M.A. Program 

The Department's course offerings are geared to the Ph.D. pro- 
gram, but qualified M.A. applicants are admitted. The requirements 
for the M.A. degree are the entire core curriculum of the Ph.D. pro- 
gram, two elective courses, and a written comprehensive examination. 
Admission Information 

Students who are quite sure they wish to pursue a Ph.D. should 
apply for admission directly to the Ph.D. program and not the M.A. 
program. Requirements for admission are at the same level for both 



programs, and students who are admitted to one may usually trans- 
fer, given satisfactory performance, to the other. Financial aid is 
available only to full-time students in the Ph.D. program. 

Requests for application forms for admission should be addressed 
to Boston College, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Office of 
Graduate Admissions, McGuinn Hall 221, 140 Commonwealth 
Avenue, Chestnut HiU, MA 02467. For further information, e-mail: 
foleym@bc.edu. For up-to-date information including courses offered 
and course syllabi, consult the Economics Department webpage at 
http://fmwww.bc.edu/EC/EC.html. Applicants are required to submit 
college transcripts, three letters of recommendation, a statement of pur- 
pose, and scores from the Graduate Record Examination's quantitative, 
verbal, and analytical tests. Ph.D. applicants interested in financial 
assistance awarded by the Department of Economics should ensure 
that their applications are completed by February 1 . Applications com- 
pleted beyond that date will be considered, but will be subject to 
reduced chances of financial aid awards. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
EC 131 Principles of Economics I — Micro (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course is an analysis of prices, output, and income distri- 
bution through the interaction of households and business firms in 
a modern Western economy. The appropriate role of government 
intervention is examined and basic analytical tools are applied to 
current economic problems. 
The Department 
EC 132 Principles of Economics II — Macro (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course is an analysis of national income and employment, 
economic fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policy, inflation, growth, 
and international aspects of macroeconomic policy. 
The Department 

EC 151 Economic Statistics (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course is focused on probability, random variables, sam- 
pling distributions, estimation of parameters, tests of hypotheses, 
regression and forecasting. 
The Department 

EC 155 Statistics — CSOM Honors (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Calculus 

This course is a more intensive analytical treatment of the top- 
ics covered in EC 151 and it is designed for Carroll School of 
Management students. 
Richard McGowan, S.J. 
EC 157 Statistics — Honors (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Calculus 

A more intensive analytical treatment of the topics covered in 
EC 151. 
The Department 

EC 199 Economics Internship (Fall: 1) 

Francis M. McLaughlin 

EC 201 Microeconomic Theory (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 131 and Calculus 

This course develops a theoretical framework with which to 
analyze consumer and producer behavior. This analysis is then 
employed to investigate the determination of prices and output in 
various market situations, the implications for welfare and the 
appropriate role for government intervention. 
The Department 



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EC 202 Macroeconomic Theory (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 132 and Calculus 

This course is intended to equip the student for the analysis of 
the determination of employment and national income. Emphasis 
will be placed on the Keynesian theory of employment, interest, and 
money and on post-Keynesian macroeconomic models. 
The Department 

EC 203-204 Microeconomic Theory — Honors Level 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 131-132 and Calculus 

A more intensive analytical treatment of the same material pre- 
sented in EC 201-202. Some mathematical tools will be developed 
as needed. Open to anyone who has done well in Principles of 
Economics and highly recommended for students interested in 
doing graduate work in economics. 



Fabio Schiantarelli 

EC 228 Econometric Methods (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Calculus, and EC 151, 155, or 157 
Enrollment limited; significant writing/ research component. 

This course focuses on testing the predictions of economic theory. 
Topics covered include simple and mtdtiple regression, multicoUineari- 
ty, heteroskedasticity, serial correlation, specification errors, errors in 
variables, and an introduction to simultaneous equation estimation. 
Christopher Baum 
The Department 

EC 229 Economic and Business Forecasting (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Calculus and EC 151, 155, or 157 
Cross listed with MD 606 

The theory and practice of applied time series analysis will be 
explored including the subjeCTs of dynamic modeling, parameter estima- 
tion, prediction, and model evaluation. Specific topics to be covered wiU 
include linear regression, ARMA models, and vector autoregressions. 
Richard McGowan, S.J. 

EC 232 American Economic History (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: EC 131-132 

Study of the causes and social and institutional changes of 
American economic growth from colonial times to the 20th centu- 
ry. Economic models will suggest primary causes; alternative view- 
points will also be considered. 
James Anderson 

EC 233 History of Economic Thought (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: EC 131-132 

This course will survey the history of economic thinking from 
the ancient Greeks through the modern period. The emphasis of the 
course will be on classical and neoclassical economics from Adam 
Smith through John Maynard Keynes and the neoclassical synthesis 
of Paul Samuelson. Attention will also be given to contemporary 
developments. 
Francis McLaughlin 

EC 234 Economics and Catholic Social Teaching (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: EC 131-132 
Enrollment limited; significant writing/ research component. 

This course will explore questions of economic justice in terms 
of Catholic social teaching. Our approach will be primarily histori- 
cal; we will read and reflect on some of the major Church documents 
to identify important themes in the teaching that apply to the devel- 
opment of economic policy. These themes will be linked to concepts 
in the history of economic thought and in the field of welfare eco- 



nomics. Note: The course is particularly suited to students of the 

Faith, Peace and Justice program, in addition to serving as a regular 

elective for the Economics major. 

Catherine Schneider 

EC 27 1 International Economic Relations (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: EC 131-132 

EC 271 is an introduction to international economic relations. 
The course is intended for international studies majors and requires 
permission of the instructor. Expectations are high in international 
studies, so the work load is ambitious. Topics include elements of 
game theory, the theory of international trade and trade policy, and 
the theory of open economy macroeconomic policy. 
James Anderson 

EC 278 Environmental Economics (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: EC 131-132 

The course will examine different aspects of natural resource 
allocation and the protection of environmental quality from an eco- 
nomic standpoint, including: specific areas of market failure, the 
allocation of public goods, the estimation of non-market values, 
public policy avenues for influencing natural resource management, 
and ethical issues in natural resource management. 
Frank Gollop 
EC 299 Independent Study (Fall/Spring: 3) 

The student works under the direction of an individual professor. 
Francis McLaughlin 

EC 304 Macroeconomic Policymaking (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 202 or EC 204 
Enrollment limited; significant writing/research component. 

This course studies macroeconomic policy in the United States 
over the past three decades. We will explore historical examples of 
macroeconomic problems and and the policies that were used to con- 
front them. Examples will include the military build up of the 1 960 s, 
the oil price shocks of the 1970's, the budget deficits of the 1980s, and 
the credit crunch of the early 1990s, among others. We will also exam- 
ine the tools macroeconomists use in providing policy advice. A major 
component of the course will be frequent written assignments in which 
students assess macroeconomic conditions and provide policy guidance. 
Robert Murphy 

EC 306 Economics of Asymmetric Information (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 201 (203) and Calculus 
Formerly listed as EC 307 Contract Theory 

Many economic exchanges are characterized by informational 
asymmetries between the parties; for instance, a seller may have more 
information about the quality of the good it sells than the buyer. This 
class provides a set of tools to analyze such situations. After a general 
introduction to basic theory, the course will cover a number of appli- 
cations, including health insurance, the internal organization of 
firms, regulation, and topics in industrial organization. 



EC 308 Game Theory in Economics (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 

Game Theory is the social science that analyzes how to think 
(and act) strategically in interactive situations. This course presents 
Game Theory with its applications to real world situations. 
Hideo Konishi 

EC 309 Introduction to Scientific Computation (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with MC 130 

This course is required for students minoring in Scientific 
Computation. 

See course description in the Computer Science Department. 
Howard Straubing (Computer Science) 



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EC 310 Economic Psychology (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: EC 201-202 (EC 203-204) 

Enrollment limited; significant writing/ research component 

Economists have become increasingly interested in the connec- 
tion between economics and psychology. Insights about human 
nature that come from psychology can be informative for economic 
models. This course is a survey of a variety of topics that are at the 
crossroads between economics and psychology, including: risk and 
harm avoidance, time preference, mental accounts, manipulative 
and violent behavior, altruism and reciprocity, the connections 
between emotions and economic behavior, concern for relative sta- 
tus, and habits and addictions. Much of the material comes from 
recent research. The psychological perspective comes mostly from 
the field of evolutionary psychology. 
Donald Cox 

EC 311 Mathematics for Economists (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Introductory Calculus, EC 201-202 (EC 203-204) 

The course is an introduction to the uses of calculus and other 
mathematical tools in economic analysis. 
Catherine Schneider 

EC 315 Numerical Methods and Scientific Computation (Spring: 4) 
Prerequisites: MT 202, and one of PH 330, MT 330, CH 330, EC 
314, plus permission of instructor 
Cross listed vsrith PH 430 

This course is intended for students who plan to minor in 
Scientific Computation. It is also an elective for Physics majors. 
Enrollment limited; significant writing/ research component. 

See course description in the Physics Department. 
David Broido (Physics) 
Jan Engelbrecht (Physics) 

EC 316 Advanced Scientific Computation (Fall: 4) 
Prerequisites: One oiVn 330, CH 330, MT 330 or EC 314, and 
oneofPH 430 or EC 315; or permission of instructors. 
Cross listed with PH 530 

See course description in the Physics Department. 
Christopher Baum (Economics) 
David Broido (Physics) 
Howard Straubing (Computer Science) 
EC 327 Advanced Econometrics (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: EC 228 or equivalent, calculus and linear algebra 
Enrollment limited; significant writing/ research component. 

Topics covered: estimation and inference of linear regression 
models, asymptotic theory, the principle of maximum likelihood, 
analysis of panel data, time series models, and non-parametric meth- 
ods. 

Christopher Baum 

EC 338 Law and Economics (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 203 

In this course, we utilize microeconomic analysis to evaluate 
the performance of legal institutions with particular attention to the 
issue of economic efficiency. We will focus on questions in the com- 
mon law fields of property, torts, and contracts (and in the theory 
and practice of criminal law if time permits). 
Mary Oates 

EC 340 Labor Economics (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: EC 201-202 

This course will introduce students to the methodology of 
labor economics from both institutional and neoclassical perspec- 
tives. The principal emphasis will be on neoclassical theory and 
empirical work dealing with the supply and demand for labor; the 
operation of the labor market; the determination of wages; and the 



impact of trade unions and collective bargaining. Special emphasis 

will be placed on applications of theory and empirical findings to 

policy questions. 

Francis McLaughlin 

EC 349 Economics of Human Resources (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 203 

This course addresses a variety of topics about labor markets, 
careers, labor-market policy, and family behavior. A sampling of 
issues explored: earnings prospects of baby-boomers, the superstar 
phenomenon in the labor market, how school affects workers, immi- 
gration policy, protectionism, discrimination, women in the labor 
market, life-cycle patterns in careers and earnings, motives for pri- 
vate transfers among family members, the economic value of human 
life, and health and safety policy. 
Donald Cox 

EC 355 Topics and Case Studies in Antitrust Law and 
Economics (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 203 
Enrollment limited; significant writing/research component. 

The course focuses on some of the principle issues in current 
antitrust law and public policy. Students will read articles and leading 
antitrust cases. The issues and cases will be discussed in class. Areas to 
be covered include market definition for assessing market power; a 
framework for analyzing price fixing; predatory pricing; merger poli- 
cy (DOJ/FTC versus FERC); antitrust damages (causation and mea- 
surement); and determinants of executive compensation. 
James Dalton 

EC 361 Monetary Theory and Policy (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 202 or EC 204 

An analysis of the operation and behavior of financial markets 
and financial institutions. Emphasis is placed on financial interme- 
diaries, including commercial banks and the central bank. The 
money supply process and alternative theories of the demand for 
money are considered, as well as their implications for monetary 
policies and macroeconomic performance. 
Hossein Kazemi 

EC 364 Monetary and Fiscal Policy (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 202 or EC 204 
Enrollment limited; significant writing/research component. 

This course will examine both the theoretical and practical 
aspects of monetary and fiscal policy. On the monetary side, it will 
look at the mechanism through which monetary policy impacts the 
real economy and the price level. The fiscal side will explore the the- 
oretical arguments about the effectiveness of fiscal policy and the 
practical developments that have precluded fiscal policy initiatives in 
recent years. 
Alicia Munnell 

EC 365 Public Finance (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 203 

This is a course in the microeconomics of the public sector We 
will discuss the rationale for the government's role in a market econ- 
omy, major expenditure programs, and the theory and structure of 
the tax system. The focus will be on the federal (as opposed to state 
and local) government's expenditure and tax programs, with special 
attention given to topics of current concern. 
Richard Tresch 

EC 371 International Trade (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 203 

This course is an analysis of the foundations of trade and the 
principle of comparative advantage leading to a sophisticated study 



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of protectionism. Current U.S. protectionist issues will be illumi- 
nated, as well as economic warfare, control of international factor 
movements, and interaction of trade and economic development. 
The Department 
Istvan Konya 

EC 372 International Finance (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 202 or EC 204 

Macroeconomic aspects of international trade and the balance 
of payments will be studied by using analytical models of the open 
economy. Particular emphasis will be placed on current policy issues 
related to the world debt crisis, the international monetary system, 
and exchange rates. 
Hossein Kazemi 

EC 380 Capital Markets (FaU: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 201 or EC 203 and EC151 or EC157 

Valuation of assets, rates of return, measurement of earnings, 
finance and securities markets, risk and portfolio choice, and special 
problems in investment. The course is designed to give students an 
appreciation of the role of securities markets in the allocation of cap- 
ital. It assumes some background in economics, but no prior work 
in finance. Finance majors should not take the course since they 
would encounter most of the material elsewhere and anyone who has 
had basic finance would find about half of the topics redundant. 
Harold Petersen 

EC 435 Capstone: Business as a Calling (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: EC 131-132 

Cross listed with UN 535 

Enrollment limited; significant writing/ research component. 

This seminar explores the question of business as a calling, as 
an activity that yields great personal satisfaction quite apart from the 
money it brings. Is business a noble activity or is it a rather crass, but 
necessary pursuit? Does a view of business as a calling help us to 
bridge the spiritual and the temporal? For an economy to work, do 
we need moral and political capital as well as economic capital? If so, 
how do we sustain our moral and political capital, or rebuild it if it 
is eroding, or develop it where it is missing? 
Harold Petersen 
EC 497 Senior Honors Research (Fall: 3) 

This course provides guidance in developing a thesis topic and 
preparing a detailed proposal. 
Robert Murphy 

EC 498 Senior Honors Thesis (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 497 

Required of all seniors seeking a degree with Honors in 
Economics. 
Robert Murphy 

EC 601 Advanced Independent Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Formerly known as Scholar of the College 

Required of all seniors seeking a degree with Advanced 
Independent Research status. 
Francis McLaughlin 

Graduate Course Offerings 

EC 720 Math for Economists (Fall: 3) 

This course consists of two modules: one on linear algebra and 
the other on economic dynamics. The linear algebra portion of the 
course covers fundamental material in vector spaces, metric spaces, 
linear equations and matrices, determinants, and linear algebra. This 
basic material finds application in numerous economics courses, 
including macro theory, micro theory, and econometrics, and will be 



assumed in the theoretical econometrics sequence. The dynamic 
optimization portion of the course covers differential equations, dif- 
ference equations, and various topics in dynamic optimization. 
Peter Ireland 
EC 740 Microeconomic Theory I (Fall: 3) 

This course covers basic consumer and producer theory and 
expected utility maximization. Also covered are special topics in con- 
sumer theory such as welfare change measures and revealed prefer- 
ence theory. 
Marvin Kraus 
Uzi Segal 
EC 74 1 Microeconomic Theory II (Spring: 4) 

This course comprises three modules. The first treats pure and 
applied aspects of general equilibrium theory. The second is an 
introduction to non-cooperative game theory. The third covers top- 
ics in information economics. 
Uzi Segal 
Hideo Konishi 
EC 750 Macroeconomic Theory I (Fall: 3) 

The first half of the course presents Keynesian and classical 
models, rational expectations and its implications for aggregate sup- 
ply, and economic policy. The second half covers the Solow growth 
model, infinite horizon and overlapping generation models, the new 
growth theory, real business cycle theory, and traditional Keynesian 
theories of fluctuations. 
Fahio Schiantarelli 

EC 751 Macroeconomic Theory II (Spring: 4) 

The first half of this course covers models of consumer behav- 
ior under complete and incomplete asset markets, asset pricing, the 
consequences of agent heterogeneity, and the foundations of dynam- 
ic stochastic general equilibrium modeling of the business cycle. 
The second half of the course incorporates money and nominal 
rigidity in the framework and addresses the role of monetary policy. 
Fahio Ghironi 
Tommaso MonacelU 
EC 770 Statistics (Fall: 3) 

The first part of this course deals with topics in probability the- 
ory, including random variables, conditional distributions, expecta- 
tion and multivariate distributions. The second part presents topics 
in mathematical statistics, including moment estimation, hypothesis 
testing, asymptotic theory and maximum likelihood estimation. 
Jushan Bai 
EC 771 Econometrics (Spring: 3) 

This is a first year graduate course in econometrics. Topics 
include estimation and inference in classical regression analysis, esti- 
mation by maximum likelihood, generalized methods of moments, 
simultaneous equation models, time series models, and panel data 
methods. 
Jushan Bai 
Christopher F Baum 

EC 799 Readings and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Frank Gollop 

EC 810 Social Choice and Justice (Spring: 3) 
Uzi Segal 

EC 821 Time Series Econometrics (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 76 1 (or equivalent) and EC 751 

This course covers major advances in time series analysis. In addi- 
tion to univariate and multivariate models for stationary time series, it 
addresses the issues of unit roots and cointegration. The Kalman Filter 
and time series models of heteroskedasticity are also discussed. The 



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course stresses the application of technical tools to economic issues, 
including testing money-income causality, stock market efficiency, the 
life-cycle model, and the sources of business cycle fluctuations. 
Jushan Bai 

EC 822 Cross Section and Panel Econometrics (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 761 (or equivalent) 

This course covers major advances in microeconometrics. The 
course will present developments in estimating models with limited 
dependent variables, random and fixed effects models, and duration 
models. 

Peter Gottschalk 
EC 827 Econometric Theory I (Fall: 3) 

This course provides an introduction to the basic tools and the- 
ory of econometrics. Relevant matrix algebra and multivariate distrib- 
ution theory are developed and applied to the traditional linear regres- 
sion model and its extensions. Autocorrelation, errors in variables, and 
other single equation problems will be discussed in this context. 
Arthur Lewbel 

EC 828 Econometric Theory II (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: EC 761 

This course focuses on estimation and inference in non-linear 
econometric models. An emphasis will be placed on current theory 
and methods. Topics covered will include asymptotic theory, quasi- 
likelihood, least absolute deviations, generalized method of moments, 
two-step estimators, specification testing, and the bootstrap. 
Arthur Lewbel 
EC 853 Industrial Organization I (Fall: 3) 

This course is an introduction to modern industrial organiza- 
tion theory. Topics will include, as time permits, the game theoretic 
approach to oligopoly theory, theories of barriers to entry, predatory 
pricing, R&D competition, and applications to trade theory. 
Hideo Konishi 
EC 854 Industrial Organization II (Spring: 3) 

This course includes an economic analysis of antitrust and reg- 
ulatory policies: a review of modern antitrust policy, including a 
study of major cases and the economics literature commenting on 
antitrust policy, analysis of the genesis of regulation, peak-load pric- 
ing, optimal departures from marginal cost pricing, automatic 
adjustment clauses, the empirical evidence regarding regulation- 
induced inefficiencies, and an investigation of the special problems 
of regulatory reform and deregulation in particular industries. 
Frank M. Gollop 
EC 861 Monetary Economics I (Fall: 3) 

This course covers models of money demand, recent develop- 
ments in the foundation of a role for monetary policy in affecting 
the real economy, and issues in the formulation and conduct of 
monetary policy for closed and open economies. 
Fabio Ghironi 

EC 862 Monetary Economics II (Spring: 3) 

This course considers various topics in monetary theory and 
policy with a particular emphasis on empirical applications. Included 
among the topics covered are money demand, the term structure of 
interest rates, asset pricing models, macroeconomic aspects of public 
finance, and models of unemployment and inflation. 
Fabio Schiantarelli 
EC 865 Public Sector Economics I (Spring: 3) 

This course covers most of the traditional topics in the subject: 
welfare economics, market failure and rationales for government 
intervention, the theory of tax policy and tax structure, the positive 
effects of taxation on labor supply, on intertemporal decisions, and 



on risk-taking tax incidence, taxation and growth, and normative, 
second-best tax, and public expenditure theory, including cost-ben- 
efit analysis and public enterprise pricing. 
Richard Tresch 
EC 866 Public Sector Economics II (Fall: 3) 

This course emphasizes problems of collective decision-making 
under complete and incomplete information. Topics include Arrow's 
Impossibility Theorem, the "new" political economy, an introduc- 
tion to mechanism design with special emphasis on demand-reveal- 
ing mechanisms for public goods, voluntary provision of public 
goods, and the regulation of externalities 
Richard Arnott 
EC 871 Theory of International Trade (Fall: 3) 

Emphasis on the structure of general equilibrium, welfare and com- 
mercial policy propositions, and the foundations of comparative advan- 
tage. The course also covers imperfect competition and uncertainty. 
Istvan Konya 
EC 872 International Finance (Spring: 3) 

Analysis of macroeconomic adjustment in open economies 
with attention to foreign exchange markets, balance of payments, 
and the international monetary system. 
Tommaso Monacelli 
EC 875 Political Economy of Trade and Development (Spring: 3) 

This course will consider economy-wide models of endogenous 
growth, as well as the sector-specific issues that arise from missing 
markets and asymmetric information. The perspectives of neoclassi- 
cal political economy will also be emphasized. 
James E. Anderson 
EC 885 Analysis of Labor Markets (Fall: 3) 

A comprehensive microeconomic approach to wage theory and 
the theory of labor markets focusing on labor supply, household pro- 
duction, marginal productivity, human capital, search discrimina- 
tion, and dual labor market theories. Heavy emphasis will be placed 
on specification and estimation of empirical models. 
Peter Gottschalk 
EC 886 Current Topics in Labor Economics (Spring: 3) 

This course covers topics of current interest in labor economics. 
Examples include analysis of life-cycle consumer behavior estimation 
techniques applied to survey microdata, minimum wage legislation, 
agency problems, informational economics, and intergenerational 
transfers. Both theoretical and empirical issues are investigated. 
Donald Cox 
EC 888 Interim Study (Fall/Spring: 0) 

Required for Master's candidates who have completed all course 
requirements, but have not taken comprehensive examinations. 
The Department 
EC 893 Urban Economics I (Spring: 3) 

This course covers basic urban economic theory-spatial eco- 
nomics, housing, transportation, and local public finance. 
Marvin Kraus 
EC 894 Urban Economics II (Fall: 3) 

This course covers a selection of more advanced topics in urban 
economic theory agglomeration, systems of cities, non-monocentric 
cities, non-competitive models of housing, transportation and the 
theory of the second-best, and the economics of downtown parking. 
Richard Arnott 

EC 900 Third Year Thesis Workshop (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Ingela Alger 
Arthur Lewbel 



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EC 901 Fourth Year Thesis Workshop (Fall/Spring: 2) 

Ingela Alger 

Arthur Lewhel 

EC 998 Doctoral Cotnprehensives (Fall/Spring: 0) 

Required for Doctoral students who have completed all course 
requirements and are preparing for comprehensive examinations. 
The Department 
EC 999 Doctoral Continuation (Fall/Spring: 0) 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy for the 
Ph.D. degree are required to register for doctoral continuation dur- 
ing each semester of their candidacy whether or not they remain in 
residence. Doctoral Continuation requires a commitment of at least 
20 hours per week working on the dissertation. 
The Department 

English 

Faculty 

Leonard Casper, Professor Emeritus; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University 

of Wisconsin 

Albert Duhamel, Professor Emeritus; A.B., Holy Cross; A.M., 

Boston College; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Joseph A. Longo, Professor Emeritus; B.S., Ed.M., A.M., Rutgers 

University 

John McAleer, Professor Emeritus; A.B., A.M., Boston College; 

Ph.D., Harvard University 

Kristin Morrison, Professor Emerita; A.B., Immaculate Heart 

College; A.M., St. Louis University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

John Fitzgerald, Associate Professor Emeritus; A.^., M.A., Boston 

College; Ph.D., Fordham University 

John F. ^cCatihy, Associate Professor Emeritus; B.A., Harvard 

University; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 

Daniel L. McCue, Jr., Associate Professor Emeritus; A.B., Boston 

College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 

John H. Randall, III, Associate Professor Emeritus; B.A., Columbia 

University; M.A., University of California at Berkeley; Ph.D., 

University of Minnesota 

Joseph A. Appleyard, S.J., Professor and Vice President; A.B., 

Boston College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

J. Robert Barth, S.J., Mclntyre Professor; B.A., Ph.L., Bellarmine 

College; M.A., Fordham University; S.T.B., S.T.L., Woodstock 

College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Rosemarie Bodenheimer, Professor; A.B., Radcliffe College; 

Ed.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., Boston College 

Mary Thomas Crane, Professor; A.B., Harvard College; A.M., 

Ph.D., Harvard University 

Dayton W. Haskin, Professor; A.B., University of Detroit; A.M., 

Northwestern University; B.D., University of London; Ph.D., Yale 

University 

Paul Lewis, Professor; Chairperson of the Department; A.B., City 

College of New York; A.M., University of Manitoba; Ph.D., 

University of New Hampshire 

Robin R. Lydenberg, Professor; A.B., Barnard College; A.M., 

Ph.D., Cornell University 

John L. Mahoney, Rattigan Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston College; 

Ph.D., Harvard University 

Suzanne M. Matson, Professor; B.A., Portland State University; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Washington 

Frances L. Restuccia, Professor; B.A., M.A., Occidental College; 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 

Alan Richardson, Professor; A.B., Princeton University; A.M., 

Ph.D., Harvard University 



Richard J. Schrader, Professor; A.B., Notre Dame University; 

A.M., Ph.D., Ohio State University 

E. Dennis Taylor, Professor; A.B., College of the Holy Cross; 

A.M., Ph.D., Yale University 

Christopher P. Wilson, Professor; A.B., Princeton University; 

Ph.D., Yale University 

Judith Wilt, Professor; A.V>., Duquesne University; Ph.D., Indiana 

University 

Henry A. Blackwell, Associate Professor; A.B., Morgan State 

College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Amy Boesky, Associate Professor; B.A., Harvard College; Ph.D., 

Harvard University 

Robert L. Chibka, Associate Professor; B.A., Yale University; 

M.F.A., University of Iowa; M.A., Ph.D., Cornell University 

Paul C. Doherty, Associate Professor; A.B., College of the Holy 

Cross; A.M., Boston University; Ph.D., University of Missouri 

Elizabeth Graver, Associate Professor; B.A., Wesleyan University; 

M.F.A., Washington University 

Carol Hurd Green, Adjunct Associate Professor; B.A., Regis College; 

M.A., Georgetown University; Ph.D., George Washington 

University 

Marjorie Howes, Associate Professor; B.A., University of Michigan; 

Ph.D. Princeton University 

Robert Kern, Associate Professor; A.B., City College of New York; 

A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Elizabeth Kowaleski-Wallace, Associate Professor; B.A., Trinity 

College; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Paul Mariani, Associate Professor; B.A., Manhattan College; M.A., 

Colgate; Ph.D., CUNY 

Philip T. O'Leary, Associate Professor; A.B., College of the Holy 

Cross; Ph.D., Harvard University 

M^^aaa. SeshaaAti-Croo^, Associate Professor; B.A., St. Francis 

College; M.A., M.Phil., University of Hyderabad; Ph.D., Tufts 

University 

Robert Stanton, Associate Professor; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University 

of Toronto 

\ji\xta.Tanne.t, Associate Professor; B.A., Colgate University; Ph.D., 

University of Pennsylvania 

Laurence Tobin, Associate Professor; B.A., Earlham College; M.A., 

University of Chicago; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 

Andrew J. Von Hendy, Associate Professor; A.B., Niagara 

University; A.M., Ph.D., Cornell University 

James D. Wallace, Associate Professor; B.A., Earlham College; 

M.A., Bread Loaf School of English; Ph.D., Columbia University 

William T. Youngren, Associate Professor; A.B., Amherst College; 

A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University; Ph.D., Brandeis University 

Rhonda Frederick, Assistant Professor; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Pennsylvania 

Paula Mathieu, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Illinois at 

Urbana-Champaign; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago 

James ^a.]a.Tiaa, Assistant Professor; B.A., M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D, 

Yale University 

Kevin Ohi, Assistant Professor; B.A., Williams College; M.A., 

Ph.D., Cornell University 

Carlo Rotella, Assistant Professor; B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., 

Ph.D., Yale University 

Andrew Sofer, Assistant Professor; B.A., University of Jerusalem, 

Israel; M.F.A., Boston University of Theater Arts; M.A., Ph.D, 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 

Min Song, Assistant Professor; A.B., University of Michigan at Ann 

Arbor; Ph.D., Tufts University 



86 



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James Smith, Assistant Professor; B.A., M.A., University College, 

Dublin; Ph.D., Boston College 

John Anderson, Lecturer; B.S., University of Colorado; M.A., 

Ph.D., Boston College 

Bonnie K. Rudner, Lecturer; B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., 

Boston College 

Susan Roberts, Lecturer; B.A., St. Michael's College; M.A., Boston 

College 

George O'Har, Lecturer; B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., 

Boston College; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Ellen Donovan-Kranz, Lecturer; B.A., Boston College; M.A., 

Northeastern University; M.F. A., University of Massachusetts, 

Amherst 

Departmental Notes 

• Administrative Secretary: Harold Davis, 617-552-3701, 
davishc@bc.edu 

• Undergraduate Advisor: Treseanne Ainsworth, 
617-552-8485, treseanne.ainsworth@bc.edu 

• Department Secretaries: Melissa Cote, 617-552-3708, 
mehssa.cote@bc.edu 

Judith Plank, 617-552-8281, judith.plank@bc.edu 

• World Wide Web: http://wvvw.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/ 
eng/english.html 

Undergraduate Program Description 

In an academic milieu fragmented into departments and spe- 
cialized disciplines, the study of literature is one of the few remain- 
ing elements of the old liberal education that still offers students a 
point of view from which they can integrate the diversity of their 
own experience. Language is the mirror of the human mind and lit- 
erature the record of its preoccupations — intellectual, aesthetic, psy- 
chological, political, social, historical, moral and religious. 

The study of literature is thus a schooling in human experience, 
and its primary use is for the development of those who study it. It 
is also, of course, good training for any field in which understanding 
of behavior is valued. The tools used, because they deal with lan- 
guage and the forms of expression, have applicability in any kind of 
work where precise and effective communication is important. 
English majors can develop these skills to a considerable degree while 
undergraduates, and non-majors will find that taking even a few 
well-chosen courses beyond the Core requirement can widen their 
knowledge of literature and sharpen their linguistic abilities. 

The English major at Boston College is designed to introduce stu- 
dents to a wide range of expression in the literary traditions of the past 
and present. It aims to help undergraduate students develop a strength- 
ened ability to work critically and sensitively with texts in poetry and 
prose, to write with clarity and grace, and to articulate judgments about 
literature with an awareness of various critical approaches. English 
majors will become familiar with some of the major developments in 
the history of British and American literature, and will have the oppor- 
tunity to choose from an array of courses covering topics from the 
medieval period to contemporary cultural studies. 
Information for First Year Majors and Non-Majors 

The English Department has primary responsibility for two 
Core requirements — EN 010 First Year Writing Seminar, taught 
entirely by English Department faculty, and EN 080-084 Literature 
Core, taught largely by English Department faculty. Students may 
not take courses through the College of Advancing Studies for the 
purpose of fulfilling their English Core requirement. 
EN 010 First Year Writing Seminar 

The First Year Writing Seminar helps students use their writing 
as a source of learning and a form of communication. Designed as a 



workshop in which each student develops a portfolio of personal and 
academic writing, the seminar follows a semester-long process. 
Students write and rewrite essays continuously, discuss their works- 
in-progress in class, and receive feedback during individual and small 
group conferences with the instructor. In connection with their writ- 
ing, students read and discuss a wide range of texts, including vari- 
ous forms of non-fiction prose. In addition to regular conferences, 
the class meets two hours per week to discuss the writing process, the 
relationship between reading and writing, conventional and innova- 
tive ways of doing research, and the evolving drafts of class members. 
EN 080-084 Literature Core 

In this part of the Core program, students explore the principal 
motives which prompt people to read literature: to assemble and 
assess the shape and values of one's own culture, to discover alterna- 
tive ways of looking at the world, to gain insight into issues of per- 
manent human importance as well as issues of contemporary 
urgency, and to enjoy the linguistic and formal satisfactions of liter- 
ary art. Individual Core literature courses are designed with separate 
titles and reading lists in four major areas: 

• EN 080 Literary Forms 

• EN 081 Literary Themes 

• EN 082 Literature and Society 

• EN 083 Literature: Traditions and Counter-Traditions 
EN 084 Literatures of the World 

In different ways these courses will strive to develop the stu- 
dent's capacity to read and write with clarity and engagement, to 
allow for that dialogue between the past and present we call history, 
and to provide an introduction to literary genres. 
Major Requirements 

Students ordinarily begin an English major in their sophomore 
year, after completing the First Year Writing Seminar and the 
Literature Core, or equivalents. In addition to the two Core courses, 
students must take ten courses from the department's offerings. 
These must include the following required courses: EN 131 Studies 
in Poetry and then EN 133 Narrative and Interpretation. These 
courses are usually taken in sequence in the sophomore year. Both 
courses train students intensively in the close reading of literary texts 
and in writing with critical awareness about literature. 

Also required are three other courses that must include: 

• 1 course in pre- 1700 British or American literature 

• 2 courses in pre- 1900 British or American literature 

These courses may be taken at any time in the student's major, 
but preferably after the completion of Studies in Poetry. Students 
who have a special interest in American literature are advised to take 
American Literary History I as a foundation for later courses. 

During the sophomore year, historical survey courses such as 
Introduction to British Literature and Culture I and II and the 
American Literary History sequence may be useful to fill in students' 
knowledge of the development of English and American literature. At 
this point, students should be in a position to begin making their own 
choices about how they will complete the major requirements. They 
will have many options from among the thirty or more electives the 
department offers each semester in English and American literature, in 
Irish Studies, in writing, in the different genres, and in particular 
themes. Students are reminded that courses taken through the College 
of Advancing Studies and/or over the summer cannot be counted 
toward the major. By senior year students will have the opportunity to 
focus on some well-defined topics (individual authors, important sin- 
gle works, specialized themes). Each year the department will offer 
seminars to enable students, usually seniors and juniors, to work close- 
ly with a faculty member on a topic of special interest. 



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Individually Designed Major 

For some students with specific interdisciplinary interests, in 
American Studies for instance, an individually designed sequence of 
courses under the English major is appropriate. Students who satis- 
fy their major requirements this way may count for English credit up 
to two courses taken in other departments. This plan must be 
approved by the Chairperson and the student's department advisor 
by the end of the first semester of junior year. 
English Courses for Non-Majors 

Though there is no English minor, students majoring in other 
subjects have always been welcome in English courses for the diversi- 
ty of viewpoint and variety of knowledge they often bring with them. 
From the students' point of view, English courses offer the enjoyment 
of reading good literature; insight into history, culture, and human 
character; and a chance to polish skills of reading and writing. 
American Studies Program 

The minor is committed to interdisciplinarity, meaning that it 
requires one to think beyond assumptions of any single department. 
The over-arching subjects an American Studies minor investigates 
are race, class, ethnicity and gender. But within these broadly 
defined categories, minors are exposed to a number of more explic- 
it, and contentious, debates within the field of American Studies. By 
the end of the six-course sequence, minors can expect to have a 
working knowledge of these topics, and their significance to an 
understanding of American culture. Minors can elect to enroll in a 
special concentration in Asian American Studies. This concentration 
requires minors to take the requisite course in the minor, as well as 
five other pre-defined courses that specifically address Asian 
American identity, culture, history, gender and literary production 
within a larger discussion on race. Students interested in the 
American Studies program should contact Professor Carlo Rotella. 
Irish Studies 

Irish Studies, an integral part of Boston College's distinguished 
Irish Programs, offers an interdisciplinary approach to the culture and 
society of Ireland. Individual courses cover the areas of social, political, 
and economic history, literature, medieval art, sociology, folk music, 
and the Irish language. In addition, there are several courses that are 
jointly taught by faculty from various disciplines. These include a 
three-semester sequence of courses integrating the history and litera- 
ture of Ireland, from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries. 

For Irish Studies minors, the Irish Studies Program offers first- 
semester senior year courses at University College Cork and 
University College Galway. The program at University College Cork 
provides extensive exposure in areas of Irish culture not ordinarily 
available in the United States, such as archeology, ethnography, folk- 
lore, and anthropology. The program at University College Galway 
offers intensive study in the Irish language for students who have had 
experience with the language. Interested students should apply to 
the Center for International Partnerships and Programs or see 
Professor O'Neill of the History Department. 
Women's Studies 

Please contact Professor Judith Wilt in the English 
Department. 
Creative Writing Concentration 

The English Department offers a creative writing concentra- 
tion that allows certain students to intensify and focus their English 
majors by taking a series of practice-based writing courses along with 
their literature courses. The creative writing concentrator undertakes 
a 12-course English major instead of the usual ten courses. Three of 
these courses must be writing workshops in any genre, selected with 
the help of the student's concentration advisor Applicants must have 



received a grade of B+ or better in the First Year Writing Seminar or 
have placed out of it. They must submit an 8-page creative writing 
manuscript in order to be considered. Applications, due at the end 
of the fall semester sophomore year, are available in the English 
office. Interested sophomores are strongly encouraged to register for 
fall sections of "Introduction to Creative Writing" or "Writing 
Workshop: Creative Nonfiction" to help generate a stronger writing 
sample for the application. Some seats in these courses will be held 
for prospective concentrators. 
Secondary Education Majors and Minor 

English majors who are also completing Lynch School of 
Education majors must fulfill more specific major requirements to 
demonstrate a broad range of knowledge within the discipline. In 
addition to the First Year Writing Seminar, the Literature Core, 
Studies in Poetry and Narrative and Interpretation, these students 
must fulfill the following requirements: 

1 Pre- 1700 class 

1 Pre- 1900 class 

• 1 course on Anglophone or Ethnic American Authors 

• 1 course on Women Authors 

• 1 course on the History of Language/Grammar/Linguistics 

• 1 course in Adolescent and Young Adult Literature 

• 2 English electives 

To acquire sufficient knowledge across this spectrum, LSOE 
students should consider taking more general survey courses (e.g.. 
Introduction to British Literature and Culture I and II, American 
Literary History I, II and III) to fulfill some requirements. Students 
with questions about the EN/LSOE requirements should contact 
Treseanne Ainsworth. 
Minor in Secondary Education 

Students in the College of Arts and Sciences majoring in 
English may apply to minor in Education, in order to gain certifica- 
tion for teaching. The program begins in the junior year. Interested 
students should contact the Coordinator of Secondary Education or 
the Associate Dean in the Lynch School of Education during the 
first semester in sophomore year. The department recommends that 
English majors completing a secondary education minor follow the 
guidelines listed above for course selection as well. 
Information for Study Abroad 

While the department is flexible as to the number of courses 
that majors need to complete before studying abroad, English 
majors wishing to study abroad should complete (at minimum) the 
required Studies in Poetry and Narrative and Interpretation. Because 
each student's background varies, students are advised on an indi- 
vidual basis. Two courses per semester from an English speaking 
country and one course per semester from a non-English speaking 
country will be counted for major credit. These courses may be his- 
torical requirements as well as major electives. 

Journalism and communications courses are not considered 
English electives unless they are taught within an English depart- 
ment. Students in the creative writing concentration are strongly dis- 
couraged from studying abroad for a full year. 

Students may study abroad for either or both semesters, but 
must contact Treseanne Ainsworth, Assistant to the Chairperson, 
Carney 448, when planning their study abroad. 

There are many strong English programs offered through uni- 
versities overseas. Majors are encouraged to discuss options with their 
faculty advisors. Some examples of particularly strong programs 
include: Mansfield and Manchester Colleges, Oxford University; 
King's College, Cambridge University; University College London 
(UCL), Queen Mary & Westfield (QMW), University of London; 



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Advanced Studies in England, Bath; Lancaster University; University 
of Glasgow; University College Dublin (UCD); Trinity College 
Dublin; NUI Galway; University of Paris. 
University of Nijmegan Student Exchange 

The English Departments of Boston College and the 
University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands exchange one student 
each year. Usually a junior English major goes to Nijmegen, and a 
graduate student comes here. Nijmegen is a city of some 150,000 
inhabitants located on the Rhine near the German border, and the 
university has 16,000 students, about 350-400 in the English 
Department. The Boston College student may attend both under- 
graduate and graduate courses. All teaching in the department is 
done in English, and outside the English Department, faculty and 
students usually have a fair knowledge of English. 
Honors Program 

The English Department offers an honors program for English 
majors. Students admitted to the program will write an honors the- 
sis. Students who are contemplating a senior thesis are encouraged to 
take one of the department's seminars during their junior year. A 
description of this program is available in the department office. 
Linguistics 

The Program in Linguistics, housed in the Department of 
Slavic and Eastern Languages, offers courses for English majors who 
want to study English from a linguistic perspective or to examine the 
nature of language. 

Graduate Program Description 
Master of Arts Program 

The Master of Arts in English degree is intended for students 
who wish to extend and consolidate their knowledge of the field 
before moving on to work at the Ph.D. level, and for students ori- 
ented toward careers in secondary education, publishing, or related 
fields who desire a challenging, rigorous, and up-to-date academic 
program. Candidates pursuing the M.A. degree will be expected to 
complete courses granting at least 30 hours of graduate credit. Three 
of these course credits must be in a theory course (ordinarily thought 
of as a course primarily concerned with the study of texts in literary 
and/or cultural theory) from among the department's regular offer- 
ings; and three must be in the "Introduction to Advanced Research" 
course (or its equivalent). Students may devote up to six of the 
required 30 credits to independent work under the supervision of 
department faculty, resulting in one or more longer papers. Students 
wishing to pursue this option should consult with the Program 
Director early in their graduate careers. 

Students must also pass two examinations: a language and a lit- 
erary studies examination. The first will demonstrate reading knowl- 
edge of a foreign language. The second will gauge the student's mas- 
tery of three different skills or practices integral to advanced literary 
studies: the ability to analyze in detail a short poem or prose passage; 
the ability to place a number of passages in their proper literary-his- 
torical context based on their form, style, and content; and the abil- 
ity to reflect on the theoretical, methodological, or interpretive issues 
involved in reading and criticism. The examinations are offered year- 
ly in December and May. 

The language exam may be taken at any time during the course 
of a student's program; the literary studies exam is ordinarily taken 
after all courses have been completed or are in the process of com- 
pletion. Students should consult with the Program Director and 
with other faculty to plan an appropriate course of study in antici- 
pation of the examination. The language exam may be taken in a 
wide range of languages and may be waived if either (1) the candi- 
date can supply proof of proficiency in a foreign language in the 



form of an undergraduate transcript carrying credits for the comple- 
tion of at least six semester hours in an advanced course with grades 
of B or above (taken within three years of the application for waiv- 
er) or (2) the candidate successfully completes a 12-week intensive 
language course administered by the Graduate School of Arts and 
Sciences at Boston College. 
Master of Arts Concentration in Irish Literature and Culture 

Boston College offers a Master of Arts degree with a concen- 
tration in Irish literature and culture under the auspices of the 
English Department. Candidates seeking the degree will be expect- 
ed to complete within two years requirements in courses granting 
thirty hours of graduate credit, at least twelve of which must be in 
Anglo-Irish literature. In addition, unless proficiency is demonstrat- 
ed in a written examination, all candidates will be required to com- 
plete twelve credits of course work in the Irish language as a step 
toward achieving reading ability in modern Irish. Remaining credits 
may be taken in Irish Studies courses offered by other University 
departments, such as History, where there is already a graduate pro- 
gram in Irish History, Music, Fine Arts, and Slavic (where Old Irish 
is taught). At the end of the course of study, students will take an 
oral examination, focusing on a specific period, genre, or theme cho- 
sen by themselves after consultation with members of the Irish 
Studies faculty. 

English faculty offering graduate courses in Irish Studies include 
Professors Philip O'Leary, James Smith and Marjorie Howes. In addi- 
tion, the distinguished visiting scholar holding the Burns Chair in 
Irish Studies will teach graduate courses in the program. 

Information concerning the program can be obtained by writ- 
ing to the Program Director, Philip O'Leary, at the Department of 
English, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467. 
Master of Arts in Teaching 

The Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T) degree is adminis- 
tered through the Lynch School of Education in cooperation with 
the Department of English. It requires admission to both the Lynch 
School of Education and to the Department of English. Course 
requirements vary depending upon the candidate's prior teaching 
experience; however, all Master's programs leading to certification in 
secondary education include practical experiences in addition to 
course work. Students seeking certification in Massachusetts are 
required to pass the Massachusetts Educators Certification Test. For 
further information on the M.A.T, please refer to the Lynch School 
of Education section entitled, "Master's Programs in Secondary 
Teaching," or call the Office of Graduate Admissions, LSOE, at 
617-552-4214. 
Graduate Assistantships and Teaching Fellowships 

Students in the first year of the M.A. program are eligible to 
receive financial aid in the form of tuition remission. Second year 
students are eligible for Teaching Fellowships, conferring a stipend 
and partial remission of tuition. 
Doctor of Philosophy Program 

Usually, no more than four students will be admitted to the 
doctoral program each year. The small number of students makes 
possible a flexible program, individually shaped to suit the interests 
and needs of each student. 

All students accepted into the program receive stipends and 
tuition remission. Fellowships are renewed for five years as long as 
the student is making satisfactory progress toward completion of 
requirements for the degree. 
Course Requirements 

The only specified course requirements are four doctoral semi- 
nars to be taken usually in the first two years. The remainder of the 



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89 



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student's program may include other courses in the graduate English 
Department or related disciplines, small reading groups, or individ- 
ual tutorials. Most students will have taken eight to ten courses by 
the end of the second year. An advanced research colloquium is 
taken in the third or fourth year. 
Language Requirement 

Students must demonstrate an ability to read two foreign lan- 
guages or a working knowledge and application of one foreign lan- 
guage and its literature. The first alternative requires successful per- 
formance on two translation examinations in which a short text 
must be translated adequately (with use of a dictionary) in two 
hours. The second involves submitting a paper in which knowledge 
of the foreign language is used to work out a literary question, or 
translating a substantial critical or literary text currently unavailable 
in English. 
Examinations 

Each student will direct a course of study toward completion of 
one major and three minor examinations. 

A major examination consists of a two-hour oral examination 
usually on a period or genre. 

A minor examination is narrower in scope and normally runs 
one and one-half hours. It may consist of an oral examination on a 
reading list or revision of a paper for publication. Students are 
encouraged to choose forms for minor examinations that approach 
the material with a particular pedagogical or scholarly end in view. 
Minor exams may focus on an author, field, or genre; a particular 
theoretical or methodological approach to literary study; or the 
design of course and preparation of syllabi on the topic covered by 
the examination. 

All examinations are graded according to the University scale 
for graduate examinations. The Chairperson of the examining board 
submits the grade immediately and prepares, as soon as possible, a 
written evaluation of the examination for the student and the 
departmental records. Other members of the board may also submit 
individual reports. 
Teaching 

As part of their program, Ph.D. students engage in a carefully 
organized sequence of teaching experiences. In the second year, stu- 
dents will spend one semester assisting in a course taught by a facul- 
ty member. In the third and fourth years, students teach four inde- 
pendently taught courses: at least one semester of Freshman English, 
a course in the student's major field or subject area, and two more 
courses selected to provide the best range of teaching experience for 
each individual student. Faculty mentoring is a part of every phase 
of this program. 

Dissertation 

After consultation with a faculty advisor, the student will write 
a prospectus describing the thesis topic and include a tentative bibli- 
ography. This material will be submitted to a dissertation director and 
two readers who will supervise, read, and approve the dissertation. 

Students are responsible for acquainting themselves with all 
University requirements, fees, and deadlines pertinent to thesis sub- 
mission and graduation. This information can be obtained from the 
English Department office or from the Graduate Arts and Sciences 
Dean's office. 
Graduate Colloquium 

A student committee organizes and schedules graduate coUo- 
quia, at which faculty members, outside speakers, or doctoral stu- 
dents lead discussions on literary topics. Graduate students and fac- 
ulty are invited. 



Course of Study 

Each student plans and paces an individual course of study in 
consultation with the Program Advisor. Students should keep the 
following guidelines in mind (counting each required seminar, 
examination, or semester of teaching as one unit): 

• 5 units should be completed by the beginning of the second 
year 

• 10 units should be completed by the beginning of the third 
year 

• 13 or more units and the language requirement should be 
completed by the beginning of the fourth year 

The fourth year should be largely devoted to the dissertation, 
but the student is urged to choose a topic, consult with a thesis 
director, and begin work before the end of the fourth year, even if an 
examination remains to be passed. 

Program in Linguistics 

In the Department of Slavic and Eastern Languages, the 
Program in Linguistics offers courses for graduate students in 
English who want to study English from a linguistic perspective, or 
to examine the nature of language generally. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
EN 010 First Year Writing Seminar (Fall/Spring: 3) 
A 15-student course designed to engage students with writing as a 
source of learning and a form of communication. 

Designed as a workshop in which each student develops a 
portfolio of personal and academic writing, the seminar follows a 
semester-long process. Students write and rewrite essays continuous- 
ly, discuss their works-in-progress in class, and receive feedback dur- 
ing individual and small group conferences with the instructor. 
Students read a wide range of texts, including various forms of non- 
fiction prose. In addition to regular conferences, the class meets two 
hours per week to discuss the writing process, the relationship 
between reading and writing, conventional and innovative ways of 
doing research, and evolving drafts of class members. 
The Department 

EN 080 Literary Forms (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

Courses listed under this title are meant to increase awareness 
of form and genre as significant factors in the experience of reading 
literature. They address formal genres like the novel, lyric poetry, 
and drama, or multi-genre forms like tragedy, comedy, romance, or 
other ideas of "form." They include examples of forms from differ- 
ent literary periods to study their variety and development. 
The Department 

EN 080.01 Literary Forms (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

This class literally ranges from Beowulf to Virginia Woolf — 
and beyond. The "form" in question is the epic, which we will 
explore in its amazing variety. We will read two translations — 
Robert Fitzgerald's elegant version of the Aeneid and Seamus 
Heaney's marvelously Irish new translation of Beowulf. The other 
works were written in English: John Earth's jokey American short 
stories build wryly on the epic tradition as does Woolf 's entertaining 
English novel Orlando. Australian Les Murray's 1 999 novel in verse 
Fredy Neptune, drawing on the super hero conventions of comic 
books, brings the epic up to date. 
John Anderson 



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EN 081 Literary Themes (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

These courses follow a particular "theme" through several gen- 
res and historical periods or cultures, focusing especially on elements 
in the theme which persist and seem to address what is enduring in 
human experience, but addressing also elements of the theme which 
change with the literary genre or the historical period and culture. 
The Department 

EN 081.01 Literary Themes (Fail: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 
Margarit Tadevosyan 

EN 081.02 Literary Themes (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

This section of literary themes looks at the way various anglo- 
phone writers have used the body to explore issues of race, gender, 
spirituality, nation, family or society. Readings will include 
Shakespeare's Othello, selections from Milton's Paradise Lost, short 
stories by Flannery O'Connor and Salman Rushdie, George 
Meredith's novel Diana of the Crossways, Nella Larsen's novel Passing, 
William Gibson's science fiction novel Neuromancer, and poetry by 
Sharon Olds and Dylan Thomas. 
Beth Bradburn 

EN 081.05 Literary Themes: Class and Conflict (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

In this course, we will explore the intertwined issues of class 
struggle and international conflict as they appear in the writings of 
two critical periods in English history: the height of the Industrial 
Revolution and WWI. Class tension and the condition of the poor 
will be our theme as we read literature of the "Hungry '40s," while 
our discussion of the early twentieth-century will focus on the treat- 
ment of war in literature. Readings will include: Mary Barton, 
Elizabeth Gaskell; The Communist Manifesto, Marx and Engels; 
Major Barbara, George Bernard Shaw; Return of the Soldier, Rebecca 
West; Three Guineas, Virginia Woolf; The Waste Land, T S. Eliot; 
plus short works by Charles Dickens, D.H. Lawrence, and others. 
Colleen Lannon 

EN 081.13 Literary Themes: House and Garden (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

Our houses define us as they tap into issues of identity, security, 
freedom, and our sense of belonging in the world outside. We will 
read about a range of "houses and gardens," and their symbolic pro- 
jections of self, as well as the evolving social meanings of home and 
property. In the works of Austen, Cisneros, Chekov, Dubus III, 
Forster, Shakespeare, and Wharton, we will read about the human 
efforts to obtain, maintain, and/or grow within an ownership of 
place. These works will give us an opportunity to discuss this theme 
and introduce others as we enjoy the fundamentals of great literature. 
Beth Dacey 

EN 082 Literature and Society (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

Courses listed under this title treat literature as an integral part 
of a larger cultural experience. They examine the relationship 
between literary works and specific social issues as the relationship 
develops in particular cultures across time. These courses may use 
several kinds of cultural and historical documents both to link liter- 
ature to culture and to raise the question of how and whether to dis- 
tinguish some of them as "literature." 
The Department 



EN 082.02 Literature and Society (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

The weird sisters in Macbeth — as supernatural powers to be 
feared they are a bit old-fashioned — but they continue to have a pow- 
erful effect on readers of the play because of their profounder signifi- 
cances. This is why Shakespeare and also writers who live in more sci- 
entific ages — from Emily Dickinson to Toni Morrison to Tony 
Kushner — people their fiction, poetry, and drama with witches, 
ghosts, and other occult figures. Students in this course read the "ghost 
stories" of these great writers as incisive, but very indirect approaches 
to social issues like AIDS, the heritage of slavery, the psychology of 
political ambition, and the social and political roles of the arts. 
John Anderson 

EN 082.03 Literature and Society: Staging the American Family 
(Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

What makes an American family? Is the family a blessing or a 
curse? In this course we will read representative plays from the nine- 
teenth and twentieth centuries to see how "family values," together 
with our very notion of what constitutes a family, have shifted in 
response to changing social, cultural, and sexual mores. Our play- 
wrights will include Eugene O'Neill, Arthur Miller, Tennessee 
Williams, Sam Shepard, Lillian Hellman, and Tony Kushner. 
Andrew Safer 

EN 082.05 Literature and Society (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

This course treats the subject of individual and group alienation 
from a number of related but separate vantage points — social, moral, 
political, religious, intellectual and economic. Readings will be exam- 
ined critically (close reading) and contextually (culturally and historical- 
ly); the hope is to strike a balance. Readings are: Madame Bovary, 
Flaubert; Miss Lonelyhearts, West; Where L'm Calling From, Carver; The 
Great Gatsby, Fitzgerald, and The Complete Stories of Flannery O'Connor. 
George O'Har 

EN 082.06 Literature and Society (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

In this course we will be studying the bildungsroman, literature 
that considers the theme of "coming of age" or coming to awareness. 
The progress of an individual through social, sexual, racial, gender 
and familial influences will be tracked, looking in particular at the 
ways in which dialect, or, quite literally, the way one speaks, is a fac- 
tor in both an individual's self-perception and his/her evaluation by 
the community and society — how speech may affect one's coming of 
age. Works will include: Roddy Doyle, Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha, 
Zora Neale Hurston, Their Eyes Were Watching God, Dorothy 
Allison, The House on Mango Street, Sandra Cisneros, Maus, D.H. 
Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, the medieval poem "Sir Gawain and the 
Green Knight," and the poetry of Robert Burns and Alexander Pope. 
Sue Roberts 

EN 082.08 Literature and Society — Love and Other Difficulties 
(Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

Love is a subject that used to be worth studying and we once 
understood that this most basic of human emotions needed to be 
studied, not just felt, in order to better understand just what's going 
on when we fall in love, when we suffer love. Taking stories, novels, 
plays and poetry from various sources, we'll look at the history of 
romantic love from the Medieval troubadours (who, according to 
Nietzsche, invented romantic love) up to the present reordering of 
gender roles and how that effects and guides our loving. 
Tom Kaplan-Maxfield 



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EN 082.09 Literature and Society (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

In this course we will explore the ways literature speaks — to us as 
readers; one literary work to another; and to big themes. Here we will 
study literature and its ways of engaging topic and theme through char- 
acter and technique. We'll study various authors, from Homer to 
Becket, representing literatures range from oral tradition to contempo- 
rary written forms, including poetry, novels, drama and short stories. 
Eileen Donovan-Kranz 

EN 082.13 Literature and Society: Literature and the Making of 
Identity (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

In this course, we will investigate how men and women have 
formed their identities — both as individuals and as a collective group. 
We will consider how social stereotypes have shaped our conception of 
"normal" gender stereotypes, and question if these "norms" have also 
caused social deviancy Through the representations of a diverse array 
of identities in an assortment of "texts," including novels, short stories, 
drama, fdm, and music, we will explore how such social forces as race, 
class, gender, religion, sexuality, ethnicity, and politics have shaped and 
allowed men and women to shape the boundaries of their identities. 
Diane Hotten-Somers 

EN 083 Literature: Traditions and Countertraditions 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 

These courses put two "traditions" of literature in English into dia- 
logue with one another They attempt to define the concept of a literary 
tradition, and to explore the ways it may develop in relation, opposition, 
or parallel with other traditions. Most courses will treat traditions built 
around national and/or ethnic experience, but traditions and counter- 
traditions built around gender, religion, or class are also possible. 
The Department 

EN 083.02 Literature: Traditions and Countertraditions: Faces of 
War: Writing and Rewriting War Literatures (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

By looking closely at both male and female responses to war — 
in short stories, novels, poetry, and drama — we will attempt to 
develop an understanding of what it means to write about war, how 
depictions of war shift over time and across cultures, and how writ- 
ers work both with and against war-writing traditions in order to 
fashion and refashion wars of the past, present, and future. Our 
reading list may include such texts as Beowulf, Henry V,A Farewell To 
Arms, The Pegnitz Junction, The Things They Carried, A Clockwork 
Orange, and A Handmaid's Tale. 
Trevor Dodman 

EN 083.03 and 083.06 Literature: Traditions and 
Countertraditions: The Land of the Free: Native American and 
African American Stories (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

In this course we will be reading the stories of two groups of 
Americans whose freedom was taken from them. Native Americans 
were wrested from their homes and lands by the white Europeans 
who came to develop this country. African Americans were stolen 
from Africa and brought here to work as slaves. Their stories tell us 
about their cultures and the impact the loss of freedom had on them. 
Readings will include: Paula Gunn Allen's Spider Woman's 
Granddaughters, Silko's Ceremony, Douglass' Life of an American 
Slave, Morrison's Beloved, plus several films. 
Dorothy Miller 



EN 083.04 Literature: Traditions and Countertraditions — Heroes 

(Spring: 3) 

Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

This course will consider the relationships between heroes and 
society. Do heroes' standards vary according to culture? Or do heroes 
have "a thousand faces," but common characteristics? Authors 
include Morrison, Silko, King, Miller, and O'Brien. 
Bonnie Rudner 
EN 083.09 Literature: Traditions and Countertraditions (Fall: 3) 

This course will explore the Native American text both in terms 
of its content and form and in terms of European expectations of 
such texts. Within the Native American tradition, we will move 
toward an analysis of the texts in terms of a masculine or feminine 
viewpoint. In order to provide a framework for our investigation, we 
will also look at some of the cultural and religious framework for the 
writings. Possible authors: Momaday, Silko, Erdrich, Alexie, and 
Allen. 

Dacia Gentilella 

EN 084 Literatures of the World (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with CL 084/GM 084 / RL 084 / SL 084 

These courses introduce students to literatures around the 
globe. Within this context, a variety of explorations based on the- 
matic, formal, social and philosophical questions will emerge. A 
given course may focus on Classical epic and lyric poetry, modern 
European drama, literature of exploration, confrontation of the self 
and other, and so on. All these courses will help students discover 
and assess the shape of their own language and thought by exploring 
literatures of other places and time. 
The Department 

EN 084.01 Literatures of the World (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with RL 393 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 
Life Stories 
All texts will be read and conducted in English. 

See course description in the Romance Languages and 
Literatures. 
Matilda Bruckner 

EN 084.03 Literatures of the World — Triumphs and Failings of 
Modern Man (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with CM 063.01 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

See course description in the German Studies Department. 
Christoph Eykman 

EN 084.06 Literatures of the World (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with CL 217.01 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 
Heroic Poetry: Homer, Virgil and Beyond 

See course description in the Classics Department. 
Maria Kakavas 

EN 084.20 Literatures of the World — Twentieth-Century Voices 
(Spring: 3) 

Cross listed with SL 084.20 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 
All readings in English translation. 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Thomas Epstein 



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EN 093 Introduction to Modern Irish I (Fall: 3) 

This course continues in second semester as SL 028/EN 094. 

A course for beginners in standard modern Irish, with attention 
to regional variants. The course is intended to develop both conver- 
sational and compositional skills and the ability to read Irish prose. 
Philip T. O'Leary 

EN 094 Introduction to Modern Irish II (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: SL 027/EN 093 Introduction to Modern Irish I 
or equivalent 

The continuation of a course for beginners in standard modern 
Irish with attention to regional variants. The course is intended to 
develop both conversational and compositional skills and the ability 
to read Irish prose. 
Philip T. O'Leary 
EN 097-098 Continuing Modern Irish I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This is a continuing course in modern Irish for those with a 
basic knowledge of the language. Emphasis will be on developing the 
ability to read contemporary literature in all genres. The primary 
focus of the course will be on the Irish of Conamara (County 
Galway), but other dialects will be studied as well, and some atten- 
tion will be given to reading texts in the older Gaelic type in use 
through the 1940s. 
Donna Wong 

EN 110 Classical and Biblical Backgrounds of English Literature 
(Fall: 3) 

The goals for this course include: (1) exposure to a broad range 
of Greek, Latin, and Hebrew literature in translation (myths, histo- 
ries, authors, characters, plots, themes); (2) attentiveness to what is 
at stake, theoretically and practically, in translation; and (3) the 
development of comparatist practices of reading that respect cultur- 
al differences. Emphasis on the Homeric epics, Greek tragedies, the 
more conspicuously poetical parts of the Hebrew Bible, and the 
metamorphoses of the Greek and Hebrew traditions in the Roman 
world during the transition to the Common Era. 
Dayton Haskin 
EN 113 Drama Survey I (Spring: 3) 

A comparative study of drama from two distinctive eras: fifth- 
century Athens and Elizabethan and Jacobean England. Works by 
Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides will be examined as vehicles for 
contemporary performances in English; likely plays for considera- 
tion include Prometheus Bound, Antigone, Hippolytus, and the 
Bacchae. The second half of the course will take up Marlowe's Dr. 
Faustus against the backdrop of medieval morality plays, then con- 
sider two or three dramas by Shakespeare along with works by 
Jonson and Webster. Possibly the course will end with considera- 
tion of Dryden's All for Love. 
Dayton Haskin 

EN 118 Essentials of English Composition (for Foreign Students) 
(Fall: 3) 

Cross listed with SL 1 18 

Exclusively for students whose native language is not English. 
Enrollment by placement test only. 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Margaret Thomas 
Mary E. Hughes 
Susan McEuien 



EN 1 19 The Craft of Writing (for Foreign Students) (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Cross listed with SL 119 

Satisfies Writing Core Requirement 

Exclusively for students whose native language is not English. 

Enrollment by placement test only. 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Mary E. Hughes 
Susan McEwen 

EN 120 The Study of Literature (for Foreign Students) 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with SL 120 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 

Exclusively for students whose native language is not English. 
Enrollment by placement test only. 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Susan McEwen 
Margaret Thomas 

EN 123 Language and Ethnicity (Spring: 3) 
Cross hsted with SL 279/SC 275 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 
Offered Biennially 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Margaret Thomas 
EN 131 Studies in Poetry (Fall/ Spring: 3) 

The goals of the course are: close reading of poetry, developing 
the student's ability to ask questions which open poems to analysis, 
and to write lucid interpretative papers. 
The Department 
EN 133 Narrative and Interpretation (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course introduces students to questions that they might 
bring to the study of narrative works — primarily novels, tales, and 
non-fictional narratives, though it may also include drama, film, and 
narrative poems. It aims to introduce the various critical frames 
through which we construct interpretations. As part of the process 
of reading, students will be introduced to common critical terms, the 
narrative genres, conventions, and discourses, the construction of 
character and the ways of representing consciousness, and the order- 
ing of narrative time. The course will also expose the student to the 
implications of taking critical positions. 
The Department 

EN 141-142-143 American Literary History I, II, and III 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 

Formerly known as Major American Writers I, II, and III 
Students need not take these courses in chronological order. 
Satisfies the pre- 1900 requirement 

American Literary History 1, II, and III follow the development 
of American literature from 1620 to the present. American Literary 
History I deals with American literature up to 1 865; American Literary 
History II with American literature from 1865 to 1914; American 
Literary History III with American literature from 1914 to the present. 
Henry Blackwell 
Paul Lewis 
Min Song 
Christopher Wilson 

EN 170 Introduction to British Literature and Culture I (Fall: 3) 
Fulfills the pre- 1700 requirement 

This course offers a survey of British literature from Beowulf to 
Swift. This semester covers the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and 



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Restoration, exploring such texts and authors as Beowulf, Chaucer, 
Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Aphra Behn, and Daniel 
Defoe. Topics will include the history of the English language; the 
history of the book and print culture; courtly literature; the English 
Reformation; modes of exploration in the Renaissance; and the evo- 
lution of drama, romance, and narrative. 
Amy Boesky 

EN 171 Introduction to British Literature and Culture II 
(Spring: 3) 
Fulfills the pre- 1900 requirement 

This course follows from Introduction to British Literature and 
Culture I, given the previous term. It will study British literature and 
culture from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. The course 
will look at fiction, poetry, and non-fiction prose in light of connec- 
tions to British history and its cultural developments: economic, sci- 
entific, artistic, and social. 
Kalpana Seshadri-Crooks 

EN 182 Irish Literature Survey: Beginning to 1800 (Fall: 3) 
Philip O'Leary 

EN 183 Women in the Greek Cultural Spectrum (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with CL 244 

See course description in the Classical Studies Department. 
Maria Kakavas 

EN 201 Versions in Black (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

The phrase "Black Women's Writing" implies that such writing 
is a fixed, if not homogenous, "thing" that can be neatly defined and 
represented. Our course constitutes itself against this idea; rather 
than experiencing writing by black women as easily definable, we 
seek to represent "Black Women's Writing" as diverse, complicated, 
and contradictory. Reading these works will encourage us to re- 
examine notions of "blackness," gender, sexuality, community, and 
history. We will examine the varied genres black women writers use 
to articulate their experiences. 
Rhonda Frederick 
EN 204 The Literatures of Homelessness (Fall: 3) 

"Homeless" is a term that came into common usage during the 
1980s and has been used to describe everything from a temporary 
housing situation to a type of person who may or may not have a place 
to sleep. In this course, we will explore the development of various lit- 
eratures surrounding homelessness — news account, policy studies, fic- 
tion, as well as writing (memoirs, editorials and poetry) by people 
identified to varying degrees with the term "homeless." This course 
will examine connections between how and by whom stories of home- 
lessness get told and the material consequences of those stories. 
Paula Mathieu 

EN 220 Classical Mythology (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with CL 230/PL 229 

See course description in the Classics Department. 
Christopher McDonough 
EN 221 Introduction to Creative Writing (Fall/Spring: 3) 

An introductory course in which students will write both poet- 
ry and short fiction, and read published examples of each. We will 
experiment with the formal possibilities of the two genres and look 
at what links and separates them. The course is workshop-based, 
with an emphasis on steady production and revision. Through exer- 
cises and/or open and directed writing assignments, students will 
produce a portfolio of short fiction and poetry. 
The Department 



EN 229 Literature of the Other Europe (in translation) (Spring: 3) 

Cross listed with SL 232 

All readings in English translation 

Offered Biennially 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Mariela Dakova 
Cynthia Simmons 
EN 230 Literature and Social Change (Spring: 3) 

This course will examine the possibility of using literature as a 
force of social change in the twentieth century. We will explore the 
way in which literary worlds reflect, transform or revise contemporary 
attitudes toward poverty, violence against women, and AIDS. Texts 
may include novels such as Gifts of the Body and The Book oft Ruth, 
short fiction by Sontag, Naylor and Selby, poetry by Mark Doty, 
memoirs such as Angela's Ashes and Heaven's Coast, as well as several 
examples of social criticism in contemporary photography and film. 
Laura Tanner 

EN 237 Studies in Children's Literature: Disney and the 
Wondertale (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with ED 140 

Disney films have remained outside the critical landscape 
because they have been considered either beneath artistic attention, or 
beyond reproach. The goal of this course will be to explore the issues 
presented in such Disney films as The Lion King, Aladdin, Prince oft 
E-gypt, and Pocahontas. To do this, we will read source material ( The 
Arabian Nights, Hamlet, tales about Pocahontas, Bible stories about 
Moses, Exodus, etc) and secondary studies. 
Bonnie Rudner 

EN 238 Medieval Women Writers (Spring: 3) 
Fulfills pre- 1700 requirement. 

This course examines female-authored texts from the Middle 
Ages, ranging in date from the eighth to the fifteenth centuries. This 
body of work is remarkable for its size and range, given the limita- 
tions on women's writing: we will read Anglo-Saxon nuns' letters. 
Old English "women's songs," biography, autobiography, saints' 
lives, fables, love poetry, mystical and visionary literature, Utopian 
literature, and political theory. 
Robert Stanton 

EN 241 Playwriting (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with CT 285 

See course description in the Theatre Department. 
Scott T. Cummings 

EN 246 Introduction to Asian American Literature (Spring: 3) 

This course examines literary works by and about Asian Americans 
dating back to the early stages of Asian immigration to the United States 
(1850-1965) and ending at the present emphasis on coalition building. 
This course defines the term Asian American broadly and will discuss at 
length why this term has been adopted by so many different peoples. 
Min Song 

EN 248 Playwriting II (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with CT 385 

See course description in the Theatre Department. 
Scott T. Cummings 

EN 250 Approaches to Russian Literature (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with SL 306 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Cynthia Simmons 



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EN 255 Introduction to Post-Colonial Literature (Fall: 3) 

Colonialism is the domination of one country by another for 
economic and political advantage. In our last century, the British 
and French empires finally crumbled as colonized peoples over the 
world struggled for independence. This context of domination and 
struggle for freedom inspired a new wave of artists and writers who 
sought to explore and redefine issues of racial and ethnic identity, 
sexuality, and gender relations. Today the issues of American impe- 
rialism and economic domination are producing a whole new set of 
artistic concerns. We will read literature and films that directly 
respond to such power and domination. 
Kalpana Seshadri-Crooks 

EN 257 Eighteenth Century Traveling Cultures (Spring: 3) 
Elizabeth Wallace 

EN 263 Nature in American Culture (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with BI 161 

See course description in the Biology Department. 
Matthew Kennedy 
Charles Lord 

EN 270 Reading and Teaching Young Adult and Adolescent 
Literature (Fall/Spring: 3) 

An introduction to the interpretation and teaching of fiction 
for young adults. After considering the emergence of the young 
adult market, we will explore four major categories of fiction written 
for young adults: realism, fantasy, historical fiction, and nature writ- 
ing. Selected readings will include works regularly taught in the high 
school classroom. 
Amy Boesky 
Bonnie Rudner 
EN 285 Nineteenth Century Popular Genres (Fall: 3) 

British writers and readers consolidated and elevated the realis- 
tic and philosophical novel during the nineteenth century, but the 
era also saw the development of mass market readerships and a num- 
ber of now-familiar popular culture genres — historical and Gothic 
fiction, science fiction and detective novels, which specialized in 
melodrama, adventure and romance. We'll begin our study of these 
developments with Walter Scott's Ivanhoe and Mary Shelley's 
Frankenstein, read stories by LeFanu, Rider Haggard, Margaret 
Oliphant and others, and conclude with the detective fiction of 
Arthur Conan Doyle and the scientific romances of H. G. Wells. 
Judith Wilt 
EN 305 Literary Narrative in a Digital Age (Fall: 3) 

This course explores the ever-changing relationship between 
literature and digital technology in American culture. In the first 
half, writing assignments will help you develop your own under- 
standing of key concepts and prepare you to construct your own 
research project. During the second part, you will locate outside 
sources, integrate them into successive drafts of your project, provide 
feedback on others' drafts, and eventually produce a "final" draft of 
a final group project. Throughout the semester, you will be asked to 
integrate technology in a number of your assignments. 
Jeanne Po 

EN 309 James Joyce (Fall: 3) 
Paul Doherty 

EN 310 Shakespeare (Spring: 3) 
Fulfills the pre- 1700 requirement. 

An introduction, placing Shakespeare's drama in the historical 
and theatrical contexts of his time. Topics will include Elizabethan 
playhouses and companies; stage conventions such as blank verse, 
doubling, and cross-dressing; and the textual and performance his- 
tories of the plays. Our plays will most likely include Titus 



Andronicus, Richard II, Henry IV Part One, A Midsummer Night's 
Dream, Hamlet, Othello, Measure for Measure,?indi The Tempest. Since 
one learns much about Shakespeare on one's feet, students will be 
asked to collaborate on short scenes. 
Paul Doherty 

EN 316 Chaucer (Fall: 3) 
Fulfills pre- 1700 requirement. 

The course will survey the poetry of Geoffrey Chaucer in the 
original Middle English, including a majority of the Canterbury Tales 
and Troilus and Criseyde. Among the ancillary readings are Boethius' 
Consolation of Philosophy, which is fundamental to an understanding 
of Chaucer, and C. S. Lewis' Discarded Image, which is a study of the 
medieval world view. 
Richard Schrader 
EN 323 Maps and Meaning in Irish Culture (Spring: 3) 

This course will introduce students to Ireland's history and its 
culture via close analysis of a series of texts that feature maps or "map 
moments." Why have so many 20th-century Irish writers and artists 
turned to the map as metaphor, or chosen to thematise cartography 
in such cultural practices as poetry, novels, painting and sculpture? 
The interest in maps shown by Irish painters, sculptors, poets, 
dramatists and novelists has never been stronger. Why this enduring 
cultural curiosity in maps and the meanings they generate? Authors 
will include: Elizabeth Bowen, Flann O'Brien, Brian Friel, Ciaran 
Carson, and Eilis Nf Dhuibhne. 
Claire Connolly 
EN 331 Irish Literary Renaissance (Fall: 3) 

The course will examine some of the key texts of this period, 
focusing on writings by J. M. Synge, W.B. Yeats, Lady Gregory and 
James Joyce. It will also critically examine the dominant preoccupa- 
tions and assumptions that structure the writing of the Revival, and 
ask students to consider these in relation to the formal and stylistic 
innovations of the texts under discussion. Thematic issues to be con- 
sidered include: the myth of the West in Irish culture, the changing 
role of women, attitudes to sexuality, class, heroism, violence and 
emigration. 
Claire Connolly 
EN 340 Milton (Spring: 3) 
Fulfills pre- 1700 requirement. 

Readings in Milton's English poetry and prose, with emphasis 
on Lycidas, Paradise Lost, and Samson Agonistes. The contexts within 
which we will explore these materials will be the literary traditions 
(classical, biblical, English) against which Milton was writing and 
the personal and political imperatives felt by writers and readers dur- 
ing the English Revolution and after its failure. 
Dayton Haskin 

EN 351 British Romantic Poetry (Fall: 3) 
Fulfills the pre- 1900 requirement. 

In this course we will read and discuss the poetry of Blake, 
Barbauld, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Hemans, Keats, 
Clare, and Landon. In addition to reading a few essays in literary crit- 
icism and theory by the poets themselves, we will consider a variety of 
critical perspectives, including formalism (the study of poetic and other 
literary devices and structures) and other approaches, such as feminism, 
that bring out the cultural, social, and historical contexts of the poems. 
Alan Richardson 

EN 356 Nineteenth-Century Literary Protest (Fall: 3) 
Fulfills the pre- 1900 requirement. 

Victorian poetry, fiction, and prose protests nineteenth-centu- 
ry social differences in ways that descend from late eighteenth-cen- 
tury and Romantic literary models. In this course, we will look at 



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Romantic and Victorian responses to slavery, women's place, educa- 
tion, and poverty. We will examine how the social and poetic solu- 
tions of Wbllstonecraft, Wordsworth and Shelley are re-examined, 
questioned, and elaborated by writers later in the century. 
James Najarian 
EN 358 Poets, Poems and Poetics (Spring: 3) 

An upper-division course for students interested in a rigorous 
and engaging encounter with the fine art of poetry. The course will 
study poems by major poets (Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Pope, 
Wordsworth, Keats, Browning, Arnold, Dickinson, Yeats, and Eliot) 
from the tradition along with the work of a variety of more recent 
poets (Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Elizabeth Bishop, Louise 
Gluck, and Seamus Heaney). A special feature of the course will be 
regular reading and consideration of theories of poetry from as early 
as Aristotle to more recent developments like New Criticism to the 
latest historicist, deconstructionist and feminist approaches. 
John Mahoney 
EN 359 Literature and Culture of the 1950s (Spring: 3) 

In this course we will examine a variety of fiction, nonfiction, 
and poetry, as well as film and other forms produced in the 1950s. 
Reading each artifact against its historical moment and against the 
other artifacts we analyze, we hope to discern how each of them 
expresses, addresses, or reflects the moment in which it was produced 
and consumed by Americans. We will build an increasingly complex 
and layered understanding of "The Fifties," a time of significant 
change not only in the social and cultural landscapes but in the ways 
that American culture took shape, circulated, and reached audiences. 
Carlo Rotella 

EN 361 Crime Stories (Fall: 3) 

This course will attempt to bring together insights from narra- 
tive theory, the contemporary sociology of crime, and the history of 
American journalism in order to explore how literary and mass cul- 
tural stories have shaped modern readers' cultural understandings of 
class, race, ethnicity and urban social disorder. In essence, the course 
will ask students to explore the narrative forms — ^within literature, 
popular culture, and modern media — conventionally used to repre- 
sent the most senseless of violations of a community's fabric. 
Christopher Wilson 

EN 364 Nineteenth-Century British Fiction: Literary Realism 
and Social Protest (Spring: 3) 
Fulfills the pre- 1900 requirement. 

In this course, we will examine the Victorian novel as a vehicle 
for social protest. Particularly, we will explore the way authors 
engaged with, and challenged, the prevailing economic system that 
came into dominance during that century. But we will also consid- 
er broader social issues: poverty and education, the role of women in 
domestic and political spheres, and issues of empire. Authors will 
include Charles Dickens, Ehzabeth Gaskell, Charlotte Bronte, 
George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, and George Gissing. 
Colleen Lannon 
EN 370 Catholic Characters in Film and Fiction (Spring: 3) 

Within the general field of "religion and literature" the new 
field of "Catholic Studies" is now emerging. In that context this 
course is interested in the imagination and presentation of Catholic 
characters, and the character of "the Catholic" in modern culture, by 
writers and filmmakers in England and America over the past hun- 
dred years. We'll read classic stories by Joyce, Hemingway and 
Graham Greene, and more contemporary texts by Mary Gordon, 
Robert Stone, Louise Erdrich and others. Films include Angels with 
Dirty Faces, Bells of Saint Mary's, Household Saints, Priest and others. 
Judith Wilt 



EN 374 Medieval Arthurian Literature (Spring: 3) 

Myth, legend, and history conspired to make the most popular 
and enduring set of characters in all of medieval literature. The stories 
of Arthur and Guinevere, the sorcerer Merlin, the lustful Uther 
Pendragon, Sir Gawain, Sir Lancelot, Sir Perceval, and the Knights of 
the Round Table exerted a fascination that has outlived most other 
popular literature from the Middle Ages. Texts and authors will include 
Mabinogi, Culhwch, Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chretien de Troyes, 
Marie de France, Prose Vulgate, Alliterative and Stanzaic Mortes 
d'Arthur, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Malory's Morte dArthur. 
Robert Stanton 

EN 377 Modern Drama (Fall: 3) 

This course concentrates on the work of Ibsen, Chekhov, 
Strindberg, Glaspell, Wilde, Shaw, O'Neill, Brecht, and Beckett, 
dramatists who used theater to challenge conventional social and 
political arrangements and confront a more general crisis of faith. 
Topics include the transformation from melodrama to modern 
drama; the social consciousness of the modern stage; and female sex- 
uality as a key subject of dramatic inquiry. While no previous the- 
atrical background or experience is required, we shall emphasize 
reading drama for its performative qualities. 
Andrew Sofer 
EN 379 Self-Conscious Fictions (Fall: 3) 

Most fictions try to make us forget they're fictions. This course 
will confront a variety of shorter and longer texts that, if they do 
that, also do the opposite, highlighting narrations' mechanics, the 
artifactuality of story, the inescapable mediation of narrators and 
conventionalized expectations. What are the uses and results of nar- 
rative self-consciousness? Must foregrounding literary artifice trivi- 
alize socio-political realities, psychological depths, and our own 
investment in invented stories; or can it undermine complacencies 
that keep us from apprehending them? What irreducibly matters in 
these fictions? What can they teach us about the hidden workings 
of other kinds of narrative? 
Robert Chibka 
EN 382 Varieties of Shorter Fiction (Spring: 3) 

See course description in EN 379 above. 
Robert Chibka 
EN 385 British Fiction 1790-1830 (Fall: 3) 

This course will introduce students to a number of key genres, 
including the novel of ideas, the novel of sensibility, Gothic fiction, the 
national tale and historical fiction. Novels in this period were highly 
sensitive to political events, and the course will chart a path from the 
radical fervor of Jacobean fiction to the counter-revolutionary strate- 
gies of writing post 1790s. Texts include: Mary WoUstonecraft, Mary 
a Fiction and The Wrongs of Woman; or Maria, a Fragment; William 
Godwin, Caleb Williams; Maria Edgeworth, Belinda; Sydney 
Owenson (Lady Morgan), The Wild Irish Girl, Walter Scott, Waverley; 
Jane Austen, Mansfield Park; Mary Shelley, Frankenstein. 
Claire Connolly 
EN 388 Autobiography (Spring: 3) 

This course will pursue the tantalizing questions raised by the 
act of writing retrospectively about the self. How does memory work 
in the act of writing? Can autobiography tell the truth? What con- 
cepts of childhood and selfhood shape writers' autobiographies? 
What is the relation between the "I" who tells the story and the "I" 
who is its subject? Readings will be drawn from many periods and 
countries, and range from Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Confessions to 
Annie Dillard's An American Childhood. 
Rosemarie Bodenheimer 



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EN 392 Syntax and Semantics (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with SL 344 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Margaret Thomas 

EN 393 Jane Austen and Her Contemporaries (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies the pre- 1900 requirement. 

A new historical analysis of Jane Austen's six major novels. 
Thinking about literature as social process, we will discuss the cul- 
tural work done by Austen and her contemporaries such as Maria 
Edgeworth, Hannah More, and Mary WoUstonecraft. 
Beth Kowaleski Wallace 
EN 397 The Whitman Tradition (Spring: 3) 

Our effort here will be to define and trace the development of a dis- 
tinctive tradition in American poetry grounded in the formal strategies 
and philosophical assumptions of Whitmans Leaves of Grass, character- 
ized by free verse, long lines, a radically democratic, anti-hierarchical 
ethos, and the call of the open road. To what extent, we will ask, do poets 
whose work looks very different fi'om Whitmans still find a place in this 
tradition. Writers to be considered (other than Whitman) may include 
Emerson, Dickinson, Stevens, Williams, Ginsberg, Snyder, and others. 
Robert Kern 

EN 399 The City and American Literature (Fall: 3) 

This course considers the place and meaning of cities in 
American fiction, poetry, and film in the 20th century — from 
Dreiser's Sister Carrie to Blade Runner, from London's "South of the 
Slot" to Lee's Native Speaker, from Sandburg's "Chicago" to Brooks' 
"The Third Sermon on the Warpland." We'll consider selected cases 
to see how writers and filmmakers engaged the formal, social, and 
conceptual problems posed by cities. We'll sample significant ele- 
ments of American urban literature/history in exploring the fit 
between the hard facts of city life and the stories, images, and aes- 
thetic choices that artists have imposed on them. 
Carlo Rotella 
EN 403 Faulkner, O'Connor, Percy and Wright (Spring: 3) 

A study of the role of character, in a world that is losing its abil- 
ity to distinguish between good and evil, in four twentieth-century 
writers of the American South. 
Henry A. Blackwell 
EN 410 American Fiction to 1860 (Fall: 3) 

The origin and development of the American tradition in the 
novel, from its local beginnings in sentimental fiction to its interna- 
tional triumph. We will read novels by such authors as Charles 
Brockden Brown, Lydia Maria Child, James Fenimore Cooper, 
William Wells Brown, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, 
Harriet Beecher Stowe and Henry James. The contributions of such 
subgenres as the epistolary novel, bildungsroman, the historical 
novel, Gothic romance, and "woman's fiction" will be considered. 
The aim of the course is to understand the work American novels 
have done in the development of American political and cultural life. 
James Wallace 
EN 411 American Fiction 1860-1914 (Spring: 3) 

A survey of the development of the American novel from 
Realism to Post-Modernism, emphasizing the response of writers to 
historical and social conditions, the creation of the "modern" sensi- 
bility, and definitions and themes of postmodernity. We will be 
interested in such phenomena as the impact of journalism, film, and 
the growth of the mass audience. Authors may include James, 
Twain, Edith Wharton, Djuna Barnes, Hemingway, Faulkner, 
Nabokov, and Pynchon. 
James Wallace 



EN 412 Writing Workshop: Creative Nonfiction (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Formerly Prose Writing 

Over the past few decades, the best nonfiction being written has 
expanded to include not only such traditional forms as argument and 
exposition but also the mixed modes of creative nonfiction. As an 
intermediate-level course, we will build on the work of the First- Year 
Writing Seminar and hone the skills needed in advanced writing elec- 
tives. Students in this course choose their own topics and explore the 
range of possibilities now available to the nonfiction writer. 
The Department 
EN 416 The Epic Novel (Spring: 3) 

The epic is an ambitious literary work that uses conventions 
established by Homer and Virgil to tell a story expressing the essen- 
tial details of an entire civilization. For years an additional attribute 
of the epic was that it must be written in verse. But when Cervantes 
wrote Don Quixote, he showed that the epic could be written in the 
form of a novel. Students will read five epic novels, including works 
from the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries, both English and 
American, by such novelists as Fielding, Woolf and Ellison. 
John Anderson 

EN 418 Introduction to African American Literature (Fall: 3) 
Cross Listed with BK 106 

See course description in the Black Studies Department. 
Joyce Scott 

EN 422 Self and the City: A Personal Response (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Philosophy Core Fulfilled 
Cross Listed with PL 222 

See course description in the Philosophy Department. 
Kathleen Hirsch 
EN 434 Global Fiction (Spring: 3) 

One of the striking effects of globalization in the literary realm 
has been the appearance of certain transnational features in experi- 
mental prose fiction. The course is a sampling of some of these signif- 
icant global fictions. Prime candidates will include: Garcia-Marquez, 
One Hundred Years of Solitude, Calvino, Invisible Cities, Rushdie, 
Midnight's Children, Coetzee, Waiting For the Barbarians, Pamuk, The 
Black Book, Gao, Soul Mountain and Sebald, The Emigrants. 
Andrew Von Hendy 
EN 437 War Literature (Fall: 3) 

The epic of war confronted in the works of Crane, Remarque, 
Mailer, Shaara, Cornwell, Forester, Mc Aleer-Dickson, and in 
O'Brian's acclaimed Maturin-Aubrey saga. 
John Mc Aleer 

EN 446 Experimental Writing (Spring: 3) 
Robin Lydenberg 

EN 462 Materialist Theory and Culture (Spring: 3) 
Paula Mathieu 
EN 463 Religious Dimensions of the Modern Novel (Fall: 3) 

This course will study novelists writing from different religious 
and national traditions: American Protestantism (Faulkner), 
Continental Judaism (Kafka), English Roman Catholicism 
(Greene), and Russian Orthodoxy (Dostoevsky). It will consider 
how the nature of an artist's work is influenced by his or her religious 
background, with some attention to the issue of the relationship 
between the religious imagination and the artistic imagination. 
EN 474 Black Women Writers (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with BK 216 

See course description in the Black Studies Department. 
Joyce Scott 



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EN 482 African American Writers (Spring: 3) 

Cross listed with BK 410 

Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

This course is a study of classical and non-canonical texts of 
African American literature. Works by Terry, Wheatley, Dunbar, 
Toomer, Wright, Ellison, Morrison and others will be examined in 
their own right and in cross-cultural perspective. Short works by 
Faulkner, O'Connor, Joel Chandler Harris and others may be used to 
provide comparisons of African American and American traditions. 
Henry A. Blackwell 

EN 486 The Drama of Ethnic Renaissance: Theater and Society 
in Early Twentieth-Century Dublin and Harlem (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

An examination of two ethnic renaissances in English-language 
theater and culture: the Irish dramatic movement of Yeats, Gregory, 
etc., and the Harlem Renaissance's dramatic wing, initiated by Du 
Bois. Problems to explore include the attempt to create a group iden- 
tity, the dominant culture's exorcism of negative stage and media 
images, the rewriting of history, the place of dialect and folk mater- 
ial in dramas written for urban audiences, the relation of theaters to 
political movements, the friction with factions of the audience, and 
the divisive effect of plays of urban poverty. 
Philip T. O'Leary 

EN 493 Shakespeare's England, 1450-1603 (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with HS 429 

See course description in the History Department. 
Burke Griggs 

EN 494 Revolutionary Britain, 1603-1714 (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with HS 430 
Fulfills the pre- 1700 requirement 

See course description in the History Department. 
Burke Griggs 

EN 499 Shakespeare and the Reformation (Fall: 3) 
Fulfills the pre- 1700 requirement 

A study of Shakespeare's plays and their background in the English 
religious/political setting. The course focuses on key works, comedies, 
histories, tragedies, romances, in which Shakespeare explores the rifts, 
traditions, revolutions, in his society. We will chart Shakespeare's evolv- 
ing response to the world of Queen Elizabeth I and James I. Likely plays 
include: Twelfth Night, All's Well That Ends Well Othello, King Lear, 
Antony and Cleopatra, The Tempest, King Henry VIII. 
Dennis Taylor 
EN 502 Abbey Theatre Summer Workshop (Fall/Spring: 3) 

The Abbey Theatre Program, a six-week Summer Workshop in 
Dublin, consists of an intensive five weeks of classes, lectures, and 
demonstrations by members of the Abbey Theatre Company in act- 
ing, directing, production, and management, culminating in the 
staging of an Irish play. There will also be lectures in the history of 
Irish theatre. A week of travel, at will, in Ireland will be provided at 
the end of the workshop. Interested students should apply to 
Professor Philip O'Leary, English Department before March 1. 
Philip T. O'Leary 
EN 503 Ireland: The Colonial Context (Fall: 3) 

As Seamus Deane asserts, "Ireland is the only Western 
European country that has had both an early and a late colonial 
experience." This course spans the major cultural and historical 
moments and surveys the associated literary production connecting 
these experiences: from the Elizabethan plantations to post-indepen- 
dent Ireland's decolonization. The main objective is to evaluate how 



Irish culture manifests and/or resists the colonial encounter. 

Particular attention is paid to the issues of language and authority, 

and to representations of place, gender, and identity. 

James Smith 

EN 508 Queer Theory (Spring: 3) 

Kevin Ohi 

EN 510 Contemporary American Women Writers (Fall: 3) 

This course explores literature written by American women 
since World War II. We will address textual and social concerns 
raised in works by Sharon Olds, Jhumpa Lahiri, Toni Morrison, 
Patti Kim, Marilynne Robinson, Lorrie Moore and others. In class, 
we will explore topics including female sexuality, the relationship 
between gender and issues of race, class and ethnicity, representa- 
tions of the female body in pregnancy, birth and illness, 
mother/daughter relationships and the portrayal of the object world. 
Laura Tanner 

EN 526 Shakespeare: Early Plays (Fall: 3) 
Fulfills pre- 1700 requirement. 

In this course we will read a selection of Shakespeare's 
Elizabethan plays. The syllabus is likely to include selections from 
his early comedies, histories, and tragedies including The Comedy of 
Errors, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, As You 
Like Lt, Twelfth Night, Measure for Measure, Richard III, and Romeo 
and Juliet. 
Mary Crane 

EN 527 General Linguistics (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with SL 3 1 1 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Michael Connolly 
EN 537 Aestheticism (Spring: 3) 

Exploring the movement known for its doctrine of "art for art's 
sake," we will examine aestheticist texts from (primarily) the turn of 
the century in England and America. Why do critics find aestheti- 
cism "morbid," "unhealthy," "unwholesome," and "insincere," and 
why are queer writers and readers often drawn to it as a mode of 
expressing their desires? What use have women writers made of aes- 
theticism? Emphasizing the fascination in many decadent texts with 
the seductions of perverse sexuality, disease, crime, hysteria, and the 
unnatural, we will explore the links between such thematic concerns 
and aesthetic styles of artificiality, difficulty, and self-referentiality. 
Kevin Ohi 
EN 544 Milan Kundera (Fall: 3) 

This course will cover all the works, including the literary crit- 
icism, of Milan Kundera. We will consider Kundera's aesthetic the- 
ory (his famous ambiguity), his depiction of women (in conjunction 
with some feminist theory), his angle on desire (with some psycho- 
analytic theory) , and the political influence (which Kundera vocifer- 
ously denies) on his writing (especially Communism in 
Czechoslovakia) . We will also read Kundera criticism along the way, 
some Nietzsche, and view the film The Unbearable Lightness of Being. 
Frances Restuccia 
EN 551 Literary and Cultural Theory (Spring: 3) 

For students seeking a challenge, planning on attending gradu- 
ate school, and/or interested in contemporary theory, this interactive 
course will examine full-length studies as well as some essays and 
excerpted chapters in contemporary literary and cultural theory. While 
a strong psychoanalytic undercurrent runs through much of the mate- 
rial, a wide variety of theories will be covered. Theorists typically 
included are Kristeva, Lacan, Zizek, Butler, Bersani, Fanon, Bhabha, 



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Gilroy, and Foucault. This course is designed to enable students to par- 
ticipate in current national and international debates that, especially 
due to their political vitality, manage to touch on all literary fields. 
Frances Restuccia 
EN 558 Victorian Poetry and Cultural Criticism (Spring: 3) 

This course will study the interrelationships between poetry 
and debates about society in the nineteenth century through such 
issues as education, the class system and the "two nations," idealiza- 
tions of past or fitture societies, religious doubt, the ideal role of 
women, and prosperity's relationship to and decadence. We will 
read social critics, along them Carlyle, Thackeray, Ruskin, 
Martineau, Newman, and Walter Pater, alongside poets, including 
Tennyson, Barrett Browning, Dante and Christina Rossetti, 
Matthew Arnold, Swinburne, Dowson, and Hardy. 
James Najarian 
EN 563 Gothic and Romantic Novel (Spring: 3) 

The late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries saw remark- 
able developments in the novel form, including the emergence of the 
Gothic, the historical novel, women's domestic fiction, the psycho- 
logical novel, and the ideological (propaganda) novel. Although best 
known for the achievements of Jane Austen and Walter Scott, the 
period also produced a number of strange and brilliant works that 
far too many readers miss out on. Concentrating on works by 
Walpole, Lewis, Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Hogg, Edgeworth, Scott, 
Austen, Shelley, and Emily Bronte, we will consider the novel from 
historical, ideological, feminist, and psychological perspectives. 
Alan Richardson 

EN 571 Advanced Creative Non-Fiction: Writing About Place 
(Spring: 3) 

Through the reading and writing of creative non-fiction essays, 
this course will ask students to explore, chart, question and describe 
different places in the natural and human world. Students will write 
and radically revise three ambitious, sustained essays over the course 
of the semester: the first about a place in nature; the second about a 
place with strong personal associations; and the third (a 
researched/reported piece of immersion journalism) about a com- 
munity or subculture. Readings will include work by Annie Dillard, 
Wendall Berry, Joy Williams, Edward Abbey, John McPhee, Ruth 
Behar, Joan Didion, Jamaica Kincaid and Barbara Ehrenreich. 
Elizabeth Graver 
EN 577 Writing Workshop: Poetry (FaU: 3) 

A course in writing poetry in a variety of forms (including free 
verse). We'll look at how poets approach voice, form, content, 
rhythm, image and metaphor, and try some increasingly complex 
exercises along these lines. But much of the time will be spent going 
over — both in class and in individual conferences — drafts of your 
poems. A final chapbook with ten finished poems and a short prose 
introduction will be due at term's end. This chapbook, along with 
regular class participation, a journal of your own reading kept dur- 
ing the term, and your class exercises will determine your grades. 
Paul Mariani 

EN 579 Writing Workshop: Fiction (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Enrollment limited to 15. 

This course provides encouragement, practice, and criticism for 
students seriously interested in writing short fiction. The workshop 
format demands self-motivation and universal participation. Since 
students' stories are texts for class discussion, a generous willingness 
to respond to others' writing and to expose one's own work to such 
reactions is an essential prerequisite. Individual conferences with the 
instructor supplement the workshop discussions. Students are 



expected to produce a steady stream of new and revised fiction 

throughout the semester. Narrative preferences from the traditional 

to the experimental are welcome. 

Steve Almond 

Robert Chibka 

Michael Lowenthal 

EN 582 Advanced Non-Fiction Workshop: Profiles and 

Personalities (FaU: 3) 

Admission by permission of instructor only 

Enrollment limited to 1 5 students 

A&E's "Biography" and similar programs have renewed inter- 
est in the profile, a form that has long been a staple of literary non- 
fiction. This workshop focuses on ways of capturing, on the page, 
the vivid personalities of folks around us. Beginning with the skills 
of successful interviewing, the course progresses through various 
forms of documentary writing: the "testimonials" popularized by 
Stud Terkel's Working; the composite "oral biographies" of "partici- 
patory journalism"; and finally the kind of extended personality pro- 
files made famous by The New Yorker. Our subjects will range from 
prominent artists to "the woman on the street." 
Michael Lowenthal 

EN 591 Advanced Independent Research (Fall/Spring: 6) 
Formerly known as Scholar of the College 
Frances Restuccia 
EN 592 Advanced Non-Fiction Workshop: Childhood (Fall: 3) 

In this section we'll explore a variety of areas that deal with the 
theme of childhood. We'll also look at how memory functions in the 
writing and analyzing of childhood events, and how other writers 
have dealt with this. Coursework will consist of short papers each 
week for the first half of the semester, moving toward completion of 
a longer, 25 page (minimum) final document. Students will work- 
shop their drafts and provide written feedback to their peers. 
Readings will include excerpts from memoirs and essays by Dorothy 
Allison, Michael Ondaatje, James Baldwin, Lorene Gary, Tobias 
Wolff and John Updike. 
Susan Roberts 

EN 595 Advanced Non-Fiction Workshop: Genre-Bending 
(Spring: 3) 

In this course, we will find threads and disparities between gen- 
res including memoirs, fiction, and personal essays. The goal is to 
understand the reasons certain texts defy categorization. Assigned 
readings will be chosen from toe-liners such as Dante, Borges, Eggers, 
Sebald, Capote, Genet, Stein, and Lydia Davis. Visionaries such as 
Rimbaud and Rilke will provide models of artistic breakthrough. 
During workshops and conferences, we will discuss stumbling blocks 
and strategies. Students will write and revise one or more pieces that 
above all, engage the reader. We will have guest lectures by profes- 
sional writers of nonfiction and autobiographical fiction. 
Ricco Siasoco 

EN 599 Undergraduate Reading and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 

The Department 

EN 600 Honors Thesis (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Judith Wilt 

EN 601 Internship (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Treseanne Ainsworth 

EN 603 Seminar in College Teaching: Women's Studies (Spring: 3) 

Cross listed with HS 665 

See course description in the History Department. 
The Department 



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EN 607 Seminar: Henry James (Fall: 3) 

A writer of exquisite indirection and redoubtable subtlety, 
Henry James presents unique challenges and pleasures that make him 
a formidable yet peculiarly inassimilable presence in the traditions he 
inherits, transforms, or engages. He asks us to form new modes of 
reading, thwarting the tools we often use to make texts intelligible. In 
the semester's overview, we will immerse ourselves in close readings of 
his novels, tales, and theoretical and critical writing. Sometimes rav- 
ishing and always rewarding, James's writing is therefore also very dif- 
ficult, and reading assignments will be dense and long. 
Kevin Ohi 
EN 610 Transatlantic Romantic Poetry (Fall: 3) 

Romanticism was an international movement, spreading from 
Germany through England to the United States and changing as it 
went. This course juxtaposes poets of the Romantic tradition in 
America and England in order to compare important crosscurrents 
from Blake, Coleridge, and Wordsworth through Poe, Whitman and 
Lady Caroline Lamb, to Dickinson and Elizabeth Barrett, and such 
themes as romantic naturalism, the noble savage, revolution, the 
development of the poet's mind, and the supernatural. 
James Wallace 
EN 611 Seminar: Literature and Beliefs (Spring: 3) 

This course studies intentions, motives and beliefs of charac- 
ters, authors, audiences and genres as they struggle toward enlight- 
ened understanding and a sense of responsibility. Texts such as 
Dante's Inferno and Crime and Punishment may be read side by side 
with modern American novels and short stories by writers such as 
Hemingway, Faulkner, Joyce Carol Oates, Richard Wright, Toni 
Morrison, Raymond Carver, and Flannery O'Connor 
Henry Blackwell 
EN 613 Seminar: British Literature in Global Context (Fall: 3) 

This course follows British literature over a long period of 
imperial expansion, colonial activity, and globalization, with a con- 
cluding glance at decolonization. We will read literary texts from the 
Renaissance through the nineteenth century with a range of ques- 
tions regarding the relations of literature to empire, colonialism, and 
slavery in mind. Texts to be studied will most likely include 
Shakespeare's Hamlet, Behn's Oroonoko, Swift's Gulliver's Travels, 
selected Oriental tales and antislavery poems, slave narratives by 
Equiano and Prince, Shelley's Frankenstein, Conrad's Heart of 
Darkness, and one more recent work, Achebe's Things Fall Apart. 
Alan Richardson 

EN 615 Advanced Fiction Workshop (Spring: 3) 
Admission by permission of the instructor only. 
Enrollment limited to 15. 

This course provides encouragement, practice, and criticism for 
students who have demonstrated accomplishment in writing fiction. 
The workshop format demands self-motivation and universal par- 
ticipation. Since students' stories are texts for class discussion, a gen- 
erous willingness to respond to others' writing and to expose one's 
own work to such reactions is an essential prerequisite. Individual 
conferences with the instructor supplement the workshop discus- 
sions. Students are expected to produce a steady stream of new and 
revised fiction through the semester. Narrative preferences from the 
traditional to the experimental are welcome. 
Elizabeth Graver 

EN 617 Advanced Poetry Workshop (Spring: 3) 
Admission by writing sample only 

This is a workshop designed for those who already have some 
experience writing poetry, and who wish to work intensively on mat- 



ters of craft and revision. Students will produce roughly one poem 

a week, and critique each other's drafts in group discussion. 

Assigned reading and exercises. 

Suzanne Matson 

EN 618 Senior Seminar: Marck Twain and Charlotte Perkins 

Gilman (Fall: 3) 

A research seminar devoted to two of the most prolific and 
influential American writers at the turn of the twentieth century. 
After opening sessions focusing on biographical and autobiographi- 
cal writings, personal letters, and family histories, students will 
spend several weeks in common readings from the diverse body of 
Twain and Gilman's work. The last phase of the seminar will be 
devoted to individual student projects. 
Christopher Wilson 
EN 623 Seminar: The Novels of Dickens (Spring: 3) 

Popular showman and cultural critic, Charles Dickens was a 
national phenomenon: his novels defined a Victorian world teeming 
with energy but anxious about the very things it was celebrating — 
progress, national power, individual success, global commerce, per- 
sonal desire. The seminar will share the work of studying the artist's 
development in the history of his times through Dickens' novels, 
journalism, autobiography. Novels — probably Oliver Twist, Bleak 
House, Great Expectations, A Tale of Two Cities, and Our Mutual 
Friend, as well as an "immersion" viewing experience of the Royal 
Shakespeare Company's video version of Nicholas Nickleby. 
Judith Wilt 
EN 624 Reading Visual Ctdture (Fall: 3) 

This course is an introduction to some aspects of the emerging 
field of Visual Culture, with particular attention to conceptual art, 
photography and video, installation and performance art, texts 
incorporating word and image, advertising. Our readings will be 
organized thematically to touch on representations of race, gender, 
sexuality, class, power, and "ways of seeing." We will be exploring 
these issues across a range of disciplines: in philosophy, history, liter- 
ature, aesthetics, psychoanalysis. Our readings will include theoreti- 
cal and critical texts as well as primary material from the visual arts 
and from a variety of written genres. 
Robin Lydenberg 

EN 625 Seminar: Toni Morrison (Spring: 3) 
Rhonda Frederick 

EN 627 Capstone: Ways of Knowing (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with UN 513 

This course looks at the working of memory and its transmu- 
tation into value-expressing narrative. We will explore the represen- 
tation of public memory in writing, films, and material texts, and 
private memory of place, family, and the discovery of vocation as 
expressed in memoirs and diaries, oral history, photographs, and 
meditation. We will write about the ways in which gender, class, 
race, ethnicity and location affect interpretation of experience and 
construction of memory; observe and practice the languages avail- 
able for the expression of memory; and seek ways in which the 
process of remembering can unfold toward the future. 
Carol Hurd Green 

EN 628 Capstone: Five Heroic Americans (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with UN 531 

This course will examine the writings of two American women 
and three American men whose intellectual and spiritual gifts have 
enriched our heritage. Participants will read and reflect upon 
Thoreau's Journals, poems by Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost, 
essays by Emerson, sections of Mary Rowlandson's account of her 



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capture by the Quabog Indians. Students will discuss their findings 

in light of the four concerns of the Capstone program: relationships, 

work, civic responsibility and spirituality. 

Robert Farrell, S.J. 

EN 630 Capstone: Passages (Spring: 3) 

Cross listed with UN 538 

In our passages through this enigmatic world we reflect on the 
vision of St. Theresa of Avila, "All things pass; only God remains." 
Life embraces us in paradox. Through novel, short story, poetry and 
essay the many writers considered in this Capstone, including 
Virginis Woolf Marcus Aurelius, John Cheever, Alice Walker, Anne 
Bradstreet, Gerard Manley Hopkins, will share their insights with us 
and help us to appreciate the Capstone ideals: wholesome relation- 
ships, generous citizenship, spiritual development and joy in work. 
Robert Farrell, S.J. 

EN 634 Twentieth Century Irish Poetry: Yeats and Heaney 
(Spring: 3) 

Between them, Yeats (1865-1939) and Heaney (b. 1939) span the 
twentieth century, standing as the twin peaks of Modern Irish Poetry. 
Yeats, Protestant and Anglo-Irish, began with the High Romanticism 
of the Celtic Twilight and then, in his forties, remade himself into one 
of our great Modern poets. Heaney, emerging from an Irish Catholic 
working-class background in a time of renewed bloodshed in Ireland, 
came to view his experience through the multiple lenses of Greek 
tragedy, Dante, Beowulf, and European totalitarianism. By force of 
their genius, each invented an Ireland for his own time. 
Paul Mariani 
EN 635 Seminar: Los Angeles in American Literature (Fall: 3) 

This course explores ways in which concepts of L.A. have influ- 
enced our understanding of American literature and culture. We will 
read novels, and works of cultural criticism, watch films, and spend 
a good portion of this course on the literary, cultural, and critical out- 
put that surrounded the 1992 Los Angeles riots. Much of the mate- 
rial is on the widespread anxiety about immigration that has affected 
everyone who lives in Los Angeles, and about how artists and critics 
alike have sought to represent their city in the face of such anxiety. 
Min Song 
EN 640 History and Memory in Modem Irish Literature (Spring: 3) 

This course will examine representations of history and mem- 
ory in modern Irish fiction and memoir, through a wide-ranging 
selection of writings. Novels will include Kate O'Brien's The Ante- 
Room, Liam O'Flaherty's Famine, Eoin McNamee's Resurrection 
Man and Seamus Deane's Reading in the Dark. Memoirs will include 
Richard White's Remembering Ahanagran and Eavan Boland's Object 
Lessons. Through reading and discussion of these works, we will 
examine topics of central significance to contemporary Irish culture: 
the role of recent fiction and memoir from Northern Ireland, the 
representation and commemoration of the Great Famine, and the 
relationship of the woman writer to Irish literary tradition. 
Margaret Kelleher 

EN 643 Seminar: Contemporary Irish Narratives: The Novel and 
the Nation (Fall: 3) 

This course examines significant cultural shifts and attempts 
answers to ongoing cultural questions: What does it mean to be Irish 
in an Ireland revising perception of itself and the world?. If the coun- 
try buries its past, what will replace it? Can the Irish become modern 
without becoming less Irish? We'll read novels by Roddy Doyle, Colm 
Toibi'n, Edna O'Brien, Patrick McCabe, and Emma Donoghue, 
recent memoirs by Nuala O'Faolain and Frank McCourt, and view 
films by Neil Jordan, Jim Sheridan and Margo Harkin. 
James Smith 



EN 654 Junior Honors Seminar: Contemporary Literary and 
Cultural Theory (Fall: 3) 

This course focuses on issues in contemporary literary study, 
including Formalism, Structuralism and Deconstruction, New 
Historicism and Cultural Criticism, Gender Studies and Queer Theory. 
The seminar is meant to offer juniors who are thinking about writing an 
English Honors Thesis exposure to a variety of theoretical positions and 
critical practices as well as research methods and techniques that will be 
usefiil in shaping the thesis — or in any other research project. 
James Wallace 

Undergraduate and Graduate Course Offerings 

EN 121 The Linguistic Structure of English (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisite: Previous or simultaneous coursework in Linguistics or 
in the history of the English language. 
Cross listed with SL 323 
Offered Biennially 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Margaret Thomas 

EN 392 Syntax and Semantics (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with SL 344 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Margaret Thomas 
M. J. Connolly 

EN 527 General Linguistics (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with SL 3 1 1 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
M.J. Connolly 

Graduate Course Offerings 

EN 702 Reading Historically (Spring: 3) 

This course has several goals. First, it will allow students to 
develop close reading skills while considering the historical and the- 
oretical contexts for reading. Second, it will introduce students to a 
range of critical approaches and examine the role of reading in each. 
Third, and most practically, it aims to help students prepare for the 
historical placement section of the MA exam by attending to con- 
ventions of genre and style across chronological periods. 
Beth Kowaleski Wallace 

EN 707 W.C. Williams and Wallace Stevens (Fall: 3) 

A graduate seminar focusing on two Modern American poets, 
who together shaped the modern dialogue between a poetry focused on 
the things of this world and the world within. The terms are slippery, 
because even for both there are the concomitant claims of the external 
pressures of reality and the interior pressures of language and the imag- 
ination. The course will look at the development of each poet's work in 
light of what other Modernists were doing, including Cezanne, Picasso, 
Gris, Schoenberg, Stein, Moore, Pound, Eliot, and Hart Crane. 
Paul Mariani 
EN 709 Introduction to Visual Culture (Spring: 3) 

This course will introduce students to basic concepts in the 
emerging field of visual culture studies. We will explore potential 
and limitations of a semiotic approach to "reading" images drawn 
from popular culture and high art (with help of Roland Barthes, 
John Berger, Mieke Bal, WJT Mitchell and others). Readings will 
engage with the history of seeing as it is continually transformed by 
technology, ideology, and various cultural institutions of knowledge 
and control (through Benjamin, Crary, Krauss and others). 



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Theoretical readings will take us through methodologies and disci- 
plines including psychoanalysis, political theory, aesthetics, decon- 
struction, gender studies, philosophy, and (yes, even) literature. 
Robin Lydenherg 
EN 714 Gender, Writing, Romanticism (Spring: 3) 

In this course we will explore the relation of gender differences 
(and the social construction of femininity in particular) to literature 
and other kinds of writing in the British Romantic era (1780-1832). 
The genres we will study include feminist treatises, novels, poetry, the 
slave narrative, and essays, by writers including Mary Wollstonecraft, 
Hannah More, Ann Yearsley, Anna Barbauld, Joanna Baillie, Jane 
Austen, Felicia Hemans, Letitia E. Landon, Mary Prince, and Maria 
Edgeworth. Along with these primary texts we will read recent essays 
in feminist, new historicist, and cultural criticism. 
Alan Richardson 

EN 717 Theory and Pedagogy in the Language Arts Classroom 
(Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with ED 472 

See course description in the School of Education. 
Beth Kowaleski-Wallace 
Audrey Friedman 
EN 719 Reading and Teaching American Poetry (Spring: 3) 

This course is designed to prepare graduate students to teach 
American poetry by focusing on (1) poems and their formal effects, 
(2) historical placements and tradition, (3) speakers and "voice" in 
poems, and (4) the range of reading and interpretive strategies open 
to us as students and as teachers. All of our work with poem-texts will 
be twofold: investigating our own responses, interpretive behaviors, 
and theoretical assumptions as readers, as well as inventing models for 
bringing poems to the classroom with the richest possible results. 
Suzanne Matson 
EN 732 Contemporary Irish Fiction (Fall: 3) 

This course examines significant cultural shifts and attempts 
answers to ongoing cultural questions. These include issues of 
national identity in an era of globalization, the relationship between 
tradition and innovation in "Celtic Tiger" Ireland, the challenges 
and contradictions posed by the Northern Ireland Peace Process, 
issues of gender, sexuality and ethnicity in the "new Ireland." 
Novelists include Roddy Doyle, Dermot Bolger, Cohn Tdibi'n, Edna 
O'Brien, Patrick McCabe, Emma Donoghue, Mary Morrissy, Anne 
Enright, Eoin McNamee, Colin Bateman and Deirdre Madden. 
James Smith 
EN 735 17th Century English Literature (Fall: 3) 

This course will offer an introduction to the principal writers 
(exclusive of Milton), literary systems, and cultural currents in the 
century ruptured by the English civil wars. Writers likely to be fea- 
tured include Ben Jonson and Aemilia Lanyer; Donne, Herbert, 
Vaughan and Marvell; Bacon, Burton, and Sir Thomas Browne; 
Rochester, Aphra Behn, Walton, Bunyan, and Dryden. Among gen- 
res, the course will attend especially to drama, to lyric poetry, and to 
(auto) biographical and fictional narratives. 
Dayton Haskin 

EN 739 Major Irish Writers (Spring: 3) 
Philip O'Leary 
EN 743 Elizabethan and Jacobean Drama (Fall: 3) 

This course will cover a number of plays written in England 
during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, including works by 
Kyd, Marlowe, Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton, Tourneur, Webster, 
and others. We will also consider aspects of genre and staging as well 



as the political and social implications of theater in the period. In 

addition, we will read critical works representing a range of 

approaches to these plays. 

Mary Crane 

EN 748 Early American Fiction and Nonfiction (Spring: 3) 

This course reads fiction by such writers as Rowson (Charlotte 
Temple and Lucy Temple), Murray (The Story of Margaretta), Foster 
(The Coquette), Brown (Ormond), Sedgwick (A New England Tale), 
Poe (Ligeia), Hawthorne (Rappaccini's Daughter), Melville (Benito 
Cereno), Douglass (The Heroic Slave) and Stowe (Uncle Tom's Cabin) 
in relation to contemporaneous nonfiction. Such conjunctions lead 
to an awareness not only of the expanding canon of antebellum fic- 
tion but also of the cultural contexts within which it evolved. Topics 
we will follow across generic boundaries include gender roles, pover- 
ty and slavery. 
Paul Lewis 
EN 752 Contemporary Literary and Cultural Theory (Spring: 3) 

This course will expose students to full-length studies, some 
essays and excerpted chapters in contemporary literary and cultural 
theory. While a strong psychoanalytic undercurrent runs through 
most of the material, a wide variety of theories will be covered. 
Theorists typically included are Freud, Kristeva, Lacan, Zizek, Parveen 
Adams, Eve Sedgwick, Judith Butler, Leo Bersani, Fanon, Bhabha, 
Gilory, and Foucault. This course is meant to allow students to par- 
ticipate in current national and international debates that, especially 
due to their political vitality, manage to touch on all literary fields. 
Frances Restuccia 
EN 760 Irish Romanticism (Spring: 3) 

This course traces the literary and historical contours of a cen- 
tral period in Irish culture by plotting cultural and political ques- 
tions side by side. We will establish an understanding of Irish roman- 
ticism as a specific period in literary and cultural history that has 
important connections with the literature of British and European 
romanticism. Seminars will be organized around the following 
issues: ruins, religion, sensibility, language and translation, popular 
culture, money and the cash nexus, crime. Authors will include: 
Burke, Roche, Bunting, Brooke, Edgeworth, Owenson and Moore. 
Claire Connolly 
EN 763 Modern British Fiction (Fall: 3) 

A reading of some of the major novels of high modernism. 
Texts will include: James, The Ambassadors, Conrad, Nostromo, 
Lawrence, The Rainbow, Ford Madox Ford, The Good Soldier, 
Woolf Mrs. Dalloway, Forster, Passage to India and Beckett, Watt. 
Andrew Von Hendy 
EN 777 Asian American Cultural Studies (Fall: 3) 

This course focuses on a young cohort of scholars in Asian 
American studies who have been busy publishing sophisticated cul- 
tural critiques in the past decade. These critiques are grounded in 
exploring different modes of cultural production by and/or about 
Asian Americans while engaging in intense dialogue with theories 
informed by postcolonialism, area studies, feminism, Marxism, psy- 
choanalysis, and queer studies. We will be reading works by some of 
the most prominent and/or innovative figures working in this field. 
The course also explores some examples of Asian American cultural 
production, but the focus will remain squarely on the criticism. 
Min Song 
EN 795 19th Century Irish Novel (Fall: 3) 

This course will examine the history and development of the 
nineteenth-century Irish novel, focusing on the changing configura- 
tions of tradition and modernity during this period. The seminars 
will also discuss recent critical studies of nineteenth-century Irish 



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culture and will explore issues of canon-formation, literary produc- 
tion and reception history. Writers will include Maria Edgeworth 
{Ormond and The Absentee), Sydney Owenson, Lady Morgan {The 
Wild Irish Girl), William Carleton ( Traits and Stories of the Irish 
Peasantry; The Black Prophet), Emily Lawless (Hurrish and Grania), 
George Moore {A Drama in Muslin), Somerville and Ross {The Real 
Charlotte), and Bram Stoker {Dracula). 
Margaret Kelleher 

EN 801 Thesis Seminar (Fall/Spring: 3) 
The Department 

EN 825 Composition Theory and the Teaching of Writing 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course is designed to prepare graduate students to teach 
introductory college-level writing courses; to introduce students to 
central issues, problems, and theories in composition studies; and to 
examine ways in which contemporary critical theory has influenced 
the teaching and study of composition. 
Paula Mathieu 
lad Tohin 

EN 835 Literature, Religion, and Theory (Spring: 3) 
E.D. Taylor 
EN 857 American Nature Writing (Fall: 3) 

A course devoted to the historical, critical, and ecocritical study 
of environmental literature in America. We will trace the develop- 
ment of the genre from the romantic/quasi-scientific accounts of 
American wilderness in early writers like Audubon, to the religio- 
philosophical mode of Emerson and the place-sense of Thoreau, to 
the ecocentrism and environmental advocacy of more recent writers 
(Annie Dillard, Wendell Berry, Gary Snyder) in our own era of nat- 
ural degradation and loss. 
Robert Kern 
EN 858 Debates and Issues in Post-Colonial Studies (Fall: 3) 

The course will be divided into three segments: (1) the dis- 
courses of colonialism and anticolonialism — writers such as Fanon, 
Senghor, Cesaire, and Gandhi who dealt with issues such as negri- 
tude, revolution, and soul force; (2) the critiques of postcoloniali- 
ty — writers such as Edward Said, Gayatri Spivak, Homi Bhabba, and 
CLR James who have raised the issues of Orientalism, cultural trans- 
lation, hybridity and authenticity, and the problem of identity poli- 
tics; and (3) the contemporary debates within postcolonial studies, 
pertaining to Marxism, psychoanalysis, postmodern, third world lit- 
erature, and fdm. 
Kalpana Seshadri-Crooks 
EN 887 Introduction to Advanced Research (Fall: 3) 

Students first learn how to find information on all areas of lit- 
erary study, drawing upon traditional library resources and the 
newer electronic media. Next is a long sequence dealing with the 
creation and reception of literary works: how the text is influenced 
by printing practices, market forces, copyright laws, censorship, and 
theories of editing. Textual problems (and the theoretical problem 
of what is a text) will be considered in relation to representative 
works from various periods of English and American literature. 
Richard Schrader 
EN 888 Interim Study (Fall/Spring: 0) 

Required for master's candidates who have completed all course 
requirements but have not taken comprehensive examinations. Also 
for master's students (only) who have taken up to six credits of 
Thesis Seminar but have not yet finished writing their thesis. 
The Department 



EN 899 Readings and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 

The Department 

EN 934 Advanced Research Colloquium (Fall: 3) 

This colloquium, given every other year, is designed for Ph.D. 
students in the third and fourth years of their program. The collo- 
quium is concerned not only with refining research methods but, 
more centrally, with maximizing opportunities for producing original 
scholarship and exploring various means for disseminating one's 
work. Topics for discussion include: the dissertation; producing and 
placing journal articles; proposing and submitting scholarly talks and 
panels; writing abstracts, cover letters, and responses to reader's 
reports; grant-writing and funding opportunities; and various ways of 
entering into productive exchange with scholars at other institutions. 
laura Tanner 

EN 936 Ph.D. Seminar: The City in American Literature and 
Culture (Spring: 3) 

We will consider how American literature has responded to the 
formal, material, and conceptual challenges posed by cities. We will 
also consider some approaches to the interdisciplinary task of relating 
urban literature to the social, economic, and political facts of city life in 
particular places and times. Primary texts on the syllabus may include 
The Rise of Silas lapham, A Street in Bronzeville, Chinatown, The 
Comer. Scholars we engage will include familiar figures (e.g., Raymond 
Williams, Mike Davis) as well as representatives of a new wave in urban 
literature studies (e.g., Farah Griffin, Catherine Jurca, Richard Lehan). 
Carlo Rotella 
EN 998 Doctoral Comprehensive (Fall/Spring: 0) 

For students who have not yet passed the Doctoral 
Comprehensive, but prefer not to assume the status of a non-matric- 
ulating student for the one or two semesters used for preparation for 
the comprehensive. 
The Department 
EN 999 Doctoral Continuation (Fall/Spring: 0) 

All students who have been admitted to candidacy for the 
Ph.D. degree are required to register and pay the fee for doctoral 
continuation during each semester of their candidacy. Doctoral 
Continuation requires a commitment of at least 20 hours per week 
working on the dissertation. 
The Department 

Fine Arts 

Faculty 

Josephine von Henneberg, Professor Emerita; Doctor in Letters, 

University of Rome 

Pamela Berger, Professor; A.B., A.M., Cornell University; Ph.D., 

New York University 

Richard Blake, S.J., Professor; A.B., Ph.L., M.A., Fordham 

University; M.Div., Woodstock College; Ph.D., Northwestern 

University 

John Michalczyk, Professor; Chairperson of the Department; A.B., 

A.M., Boston College; M.Div., Weston College School of 

Theology; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Nancy D. Netzer, Professor; B.A., Connecticut College; M.A., 

Tufts University; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

John Steczynski, Professor; B.F.A., Notre Dame University; M.F.A., 

Yale University 

Sheila S. Blair, Norma Jean Calderwood Professor of Islamic and 

Asian Art; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Jonathan Bloom, Norma Jean Calderwood Professor of Islamic and 

Asian Art; Ph.D., Harvard University 



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Claude R. Cernuschi, Associate Professor; B.A., University of 

Vermont; M.A., Ph.D., Institute of Fine Arts, New York University 

Kenneth M. Craig, Associate Professor; B.A., M.A., Ohio State 

University; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

JefferyW. Wawe, Associate Professor; K.li., Carleton College; 

Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Michael W. Mulhern, Associate Professor; B.F.A., University of 

Dayton; M.F.A., Columbia University 

Stephanie Leone, Assistant Professor; B.A., George Washington 

University; M.A., Syracuse University; Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Andrew Tavarelli, Visiting Artist and Adjunct Associate Professor; 

B.A., Queens College 

Mark Qoof a. Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.S., Indiana University; 

M.F.A., Tufl:s University 

Charles ^eye.t. Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., Goddard College 

Alston Conley, Lecturer; B.F.A., Tufts University 

Departmental Notes 

• Administrative Secretary: Mary Carey, 617-552-4295 

• World Wide Web: http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/ 
cas/fnart/art.html 

Undergraduate Program Description 

The department offers three majors: Art History, Film Studies, 
and Studio Art. Advanced students may participate in the Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts Seminar Program, which offers art history 
courses taught by the museum staff Internships are available in local 
museums and galleries. For details, inquire at the Fine Arts 
Department office. 
Major Requirements: Art History 

The major in Art History offers the student an opportunity to 
develop a knowledge and understanding of the visual environment 
created by humans over the course of time. The departmental courses 
provide a broad foundation in the humanities and the preparation for 
further work that can lead to professional careers in art. These include 
careers in teaching and research, curatorships, conservation, educa- 
tional positions in museums and art centers, occupations as art critics 
or employment in the art business world such as commercial galleries 
and auction houses. Students majoring in Art History plan integrated 
programs in consultation with their department advisors. Students are 
encouraged to take as many courses as possible in history, literature, 
and foreign languages, especially German, French, or Italian, and 
other fields related to their specialization. For the Art History major a 
minimum of 1 1 courses must be completed in the following way: 

• FA 101 Art from Prehistoric Times to the High Middle Ages 

• FA 102 Art from the Renaissance to Modern Times (6 credits) 

• FA 103-104 Art History Workshop (2 courses) ordinarily to 
be completed by the end of the sophomore year. 

• Seven additional courses of which four must have FA num- 
bers at or above the 300 level and three must have FA num- 
bers at or above the 200 level. 

At least one course must be chosen from each of the following 

periods: 

Ancient Art 

Medieval Art 

Renaissance through Eighteenth Century Art 

Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Art 

• FA 401 Seminar in Art Historical Research (3 credits) is 
required and must be taken during the junior or senior year. 
This course may be counted as one of the seven courses listed 
in section 2 above. 

Double majors in the department must fulfill all requirements 
for both majors. 



Major Requirements: Film Studies 

The Film Studies major applies the liberal arts tradition to the 
present-day culture of images and technologies. Courses in film his- 
tory, theory and criticism enable students to become active, selective 
and ethical participants in a world progressively more dominated by 
the media of visual communication. 

Research-based studies in American and world cinema explore 
the mutual influence of the films and their respective diverse cultures 
and historic periods. Familiarity with several of the great films and 
filmmakers provides a basis for understanding the relationship 
between contemporary artists and industrial society. Each student 
will have an opportunity to apply this theoretical knowledge to the 
experience of film making and exhibition both through programs in 
scripting, photography, production and digital editing and through 
an extensive internship program in the Boston area. 

Students are encouraged to widen and deepen their under- 
standing of the medium through additional courses in Art History, 
Studio Art, Theater and Communication. While this Film Studies 
major provides a solid foundation for further studies and profes- 
sional involvement in the industry, it also offers the liberal arts stu- 
dent a broad-based preparation for other career options. 

The Film Studies major requires 1 2 courses, 8 of which must 
be above the 200 level. 

• FM 202 Introduction to Film Art 

A required foundation course designed to ground the student 
in film language, history, and criticism 

• FM 283 History of European Cinema 

A study of six European movements, most of which have par- 
allels in art movements: German Expressionism, Russian 
Constructionism, Italian Neo-Realism, French New Wave, 
British Free Cinema, Swedish 

• 2 American Film History Courses 

Two (2) required 

FM 28 1 American Film History II 

FM 392 American Film History III 

FM 389 Three American Directors: Specific 

chronological history courses, genre studies, or directors 

series which focus on American film. 

• FM 383 Film Theory and Criticism: A combination of modes 
of scholarship relating to other academic disciplines (litera- 
ture, sociology, history, art, etc.) with a strong emphasis on 
clarity of written expression. 

• Photography Component 

One (1) required 

FS 161 Photography I 

FS 167 Documentary Photography: The study of the 
visual image at the basis of the film experience. 
Photography and cinema are the focus of the course as 
they come together historically and at the present time. 

• FM 171 Film Making I 

Reinforces film language and history with an emphasis on 
creativity. 

Three (3) Electives— 200 (1) and 300 or 400 (2) level. 
For courses offered in the department in addition to those list- 
ed above, please check the web at http://www.bc.edu/courses. 

• Courses in Non-Linear Editing, Film Making II, and Photo- 
graphy II are highly encouraged to supplement the major. 

• Junior/Senior Year: 

FM 384 History and Art History into Film and/or 
FM 382 Documentary Film (primarily historical) are 
oriented toward research in preparation for the Senior 
Research Project. 



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' Senior Seminar 

A seminar that serves as a basis for and accompanies the stu- 
dent research project. An advisor will determine if the stu- 
dent is prepared to undertake the specific written thesis. 
Since film is a humanistic discipline, the students are also 
encouraged to take the supplementary courses in history, political 
science, literature, music, and theater. 
Major Requirements: Studio Art 

The Studio Art major provides students with a genuine oppor- 
tunity to participate in the shaping of their education. At the basis 
of this program of study is a dependence on the students' own per- 
ceptions, decisions, and reactions. Courses are available in many 
media and all involve direct experience in creative activity. Studio 
courses aim at developing the techniques and visual sensibility nec- 
essary for working with various materials. An understanding and 
exploration of the meanings and ideas generated by the things we 
make, and an awareness of the satisfaction inherent in the process of 
the making are integral parts of the program. 

The Studio Art major is designed both for the student artist 
and the student interested in art. It teaches how to make art and an 
appreciation of how art is made. The department courses are con- 
ceived as an integral part of the liberal arts curriculum, and the stu- 
dio major provides a solid basis for continuing work in graduate 
school and in art-related fields such as teaching, conservation, art 
therapy, publishing or exhibition design. Students intending to 
major in Studio Art are encouraged to begin the major in their fresh- 
man year. They are required to take a minimum of 1 2 courses for a 
total of 36 credits, to be distributed as indicated below. The program 
is to be worked out in consultation with the department advisor. 

• FS 100 Ceramics, FS 101 Foundations of Drawing, FS 102 
Foundations of Painting, FS 161 Photography, select two 
courses (6 credits) 

These courses offer an introduction to the four areas of the 
studio program. Students are strongly advised to make choices 
(in conjunction with their departmental advisor) that provide 
a foundation for a concentration in one of these studio areas. 

• FA 101 Art: Prehistoric to the High Middle Ages, FA 102 Art 
from the Renaissance to Modern Times, FA 257-258 Modern 
Art: Nineteenth Century and Twentieth Centuries, FA 285 
History of Photography, choose one (3 credits) 

• FS 498 Senior Project Part I (Fall) and Senior Project Part II 
(Spring) (6 credits) 

• A minimum of seven (7) additional courses 100 and above 
(21 credits) 

Students must have taken at least 4 semesters of work relating 
to their Senior Project prior to their senior year. Portfolio reviews are 
required in the second semester of the sophomore and junior years. 

In addition to the required courses, the following are recom- 
mended: 

FA 257-258 Modern Art 

• FA 361 Issues in Contemporary Art 

Summer travel and summer courses are also recommended for 
enrichment. Consult department advisor. 
Art History Minor 

The minor in Art History provides the student with an intro- 
duction to the art of the western world. In addition to the two intro- 
ductory courses, the student will have a choice of four upper level 
classes covering specific art-historical periods. In these courses, the 
student will be exposed to the methods of the discipline and will 
complete a research paper. 



Studio Art Minor 

The minor in Studio Art offers the students the opportunity to 
pursue a course of study in ceramics, painting, drawing, or photog- 
raphy. It is designed to encourage an in-depth investigation of one 
medium, rather than a generalized sampling of many. There are fea- 
tures of the minor program that resemble, in an abbreviated way, 
aspects of our majors studio program which we have found to be 
successful. The required Advanced Studio Seminar class for example 
will function analogous to our Senior Project. 

The minor comprises 6 classes to be selected as follows: 

• 2 introductory level classes to be selected from: FS 101 
Drawing I, FS 102 Painting I, FS 141 Ceramics I, FS 161 
Photography I 

• The concentration of classes that follow must be related to 
(only) one of the above listed areas and must be selected as 
follows: 

2 classes at the 200 level or above 

1 class at the 300 level 

1 Advanced Studio Seminar (during which students will be 

expected to complete a significant thesis project), FS 325 
Therefore if a student takes Painting I and Photography I as 
his/her introductory classes, he/she must select the additional 3 
classes from either painting or photography, but not both, i.e., three 
painting or three photography classes. If a student wishes to pursue 
a discipline that they have not taken an introductory course in, they 
must take that introductory course as an elective before taking addi- 
tional classes in that discipline. 
Additional requirements: 

• No more than one independent study in your field of concen- 
tration. 

• Courses to be counted in the minor must be taken for a grade 
(no pass/fail). 

• It is suggested that if students wish to strengthen their minor 
by taking electives, they add additional classes from the offer- 
ings in their chosen area of specialty. The department also 
encourages students to take: 

FS 100 Visual Thinking 
FA 101 and 102 Introduction to Art History 
FA 356 Art Since 1945 
FA 285 History of Photography 
Film Studies Minor 

The Film Studies minor, a joint undertaking of the Fine Arts 
and Communication Departments, assists students in developing 
critical and technical abilities in the area of film. 

The minor consists of two required courses and four electives. 
Normally, a student begins with either FM 283 History of European 
Cinema or FM 202 Introduction to Film Art. The other required 
course is FM 171 Film Making. The four electives may be chosen 
from the areas of film history and criticism, film or video produc- 
tion, communications or photography. At least one of these electives 
must be taken in the Communication Department. 

Students interested in the Film Studies minor may contact one 
of the Co-Directors, Prof John Michalczyk in Devlin 424 or Prof 
Richard Blake, S.J., in Devlin 416, 617-552-4295. 
Information for First Year Majors 

First Year Art History majors are required to take FA 101 Art 
from Prehistoric Times to the High Middle Ages with FA 103 Art 
History Workshop. First Year Studio Art majors are advised to select 
two studio courses from FS 100, FS 101, FS 102, or FS 161 and one 



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art history course from FA 102, FA 257, FA 258, or FA 285. FM 
202 Introduction to Film Art is a required foundation course to 
ground the student in film language, history, and criticism. 
Information for Study Abroad 
Art History 

Students normally come to a Fine Arts major in sophomore or 
even junior year, hoping to complete the coursework within a short 
period. The department tries to assist them in doing so with close 
supervision as well as encouragement to take several art history 
courses in approved programs abroad. 

No prerequisites are required although students are encouraged 
to take the Introduction to Art History (FA 101-102) as a founda- 
tion for further study. An extensive study abroad would serve as a 
substitute. Students are limited to one or two semesters abroad but 
prior to senior year. 

Since our department would like to offer its own stamp on the 
Art History major. Fine Arts prefers that the student take no more 
than three courses abroad. Most often courses taken abroad are used 
as major electives. These courses should not be taken in senior year, 
since the Senior Seminar is crucial to the completion of the major. 
In selective programs, e.g., in Florence, the students would be 
allowed to take an additional course or two with the prior approval 
of the department. 

The most successful programs have been those in Europe — 
Italy, France, Spain, and England. 

The department believes strongly that the study of art history in 
a location where there are first-class museums and programs will 
greatly enhance the student's understanding of the works of art in 
context. We will try to accommodate most worthwhile programs and 
make suggestions for the most effective ones based on former stu- 
dents' past experiences. For Art History, Prof Claude Cernuschi 
Prof. Pamela Berger, and Prof. John Michalczyk, Chairperson, are 
Department Study Abroad Advisors and contacts for course approval. 
Film Studies 

Although there are no prerequisites, students are encouraged to 
take the Introduction to Film Art (FM 202) and/or History of 
European Cinema (FM 283) to serve as strong foundation for Film 
Studies, prior to going abroad. 

Normally, the student should take no more than three film 
studies courses abroad. With the approval of the Co-Directors, the 
student may take other courses where there are solid, established 
programs, e.g., Paris. These courses should ideally be taken in junior 
year, since the student should complete the Senior Project under the 
close supervision of the advisor within the department. There are no 
restrictions on the term that a student may study abroad. 

Often courses taken abroad are used as major electives. On 
occasion, parallel courses offered abroad might substitute for the 
required courses if the syllabi are close in content and approach. 

Programs in France, Spain, Italy, England/Scotland, and 
Australia have been the most successful. 

Co-directors, Profs. John Michalczyk and Richard Blake, S.J. 
are the department Study Abroad Advisors and the department's 
contacts for course approval. 

The Co-directors strongly approve of the study of foreign film 
and make every effort to allow students to select their own area of 
interest in world cinema. The film studies offerings abroad in gener- 
al are often limited to three or four courses during any one term. 
Prior to enrolling in courses abroad, it is required that the student 
get approval for the courses and have several options in case a spe- 
cific course is not offered during the term(s) abroad. 



Studio Art 

The department believes strongly that study abroad is worth- 
while, exposing students to not only other cultures but other forms 
and traditions of artistic expression. At the same time it cautions 
Studio majors to consider their growth and development in the 
major and to integrate study abroad with their chosen area of con- 
centration in consultation with their department advisor. 

Students should have the following courses completed prior to 
studying abroad: 

• Two courses (6 credits) of the following: FS 100 Ceramics, FS 
100 Drawing I, FS 102 Painting I, FS 161 Photography I 

• Selection of four courses in your area of concentration 

• Up to 2 of the 7 electives that are required for the Arts and 
Sciences Studio major may be taken abroad. 

There are no restrictions on courses taken abroad, but it is rec- 
ommended that they are used to fulfill major electives or to develop 
the student's area of concentration. Study abroad should be limited 
to one semester. It is strongly advised that students speak to their fac- 
ulty advisor about possible ideas for their Senior Project before going 
abroad. Andrew Tavarelli, Assistant Chairperson, is the department 
Study Abroad Advisor and contact for course approvals. The depart- 
ment recommends programs in Italy, England, and photography 
programs in Prague and Paris. 
Studio Courses for Non-Majors 

Students majoring in other disciplines, and those who are 
undecided about their majors, are always welcome in studio courses. 
The diversity of background and uniqueness of vision they bring to 
courses enlivens and renews the ever expanding language of the visu- 
al arts. Studio courses offer students at Boston College a unique 
opportunity to learn the skills and disciplines that will enable them 
to make works of art which most exactly and clearly express their 
thoughts and feelings about the world. The sequences of studio 
courses, which do not constitute official minors, are intended to help 
non-majors concentrate their vision and give the breadth and depth 
of experience necessary for future achievement. 

Students should speak to the instructor to determine where 
they should begin in this sequence. Studio majors should work out 
the sequence of their courses in consultation with their department 
advisor. 

Studio courses carry a lab fee. The lab fee is used by the 
University to help defray the costs of supplies, props, models, and 
other studio related expenses. Studios are open most nights and on 
Sundays for student use. 

Graduate Program Description 

Although the Fine Arts Department does not offer an advanced 
degree, undergraduate courses can be taken for graduate credit upon 
application to the department. These offerings may provide comple- 
ments for the various interdisciplinary and special programs offered 
by the University. 

Advanced students may participate in the Boston Museum of Fine 
Arts Seminar Program, which offers art history courses taught by the 
museum staff For details, inquire at the Fine Arts Department office. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
FA 101 Art from Prehistoric Times to the High Middle Ages 
(Fall: 3) 

This is the fundamental course for understanding and enjoying 
the visual arts: painting, sculpture and architecture. The major mon- 
uments in the history of art will be discussed in their historical and 
cultural context beginning with Paleolithic cave art through the art 



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of the medieval period. This course will examine some of the ancient 
material from an archaeological perspective, but its main emphasis 
will be on style and meaning in art. Assignments will include muse- 
um visits and study of significant works of art in greater Boston. 
Pamela Berger 
Kenneth Craig 

FA 102 Art from the Renaissance to Modern Times (Spring: 3) 

This is the fundamental course for understanding and enjoying 
the visual arts: painting, sculpture and architecture. The major mon- 
uments in the history of art will be discussed in their historical and 
cultural context beginning with the Renaissance in Europe down to 
the art of our own time. The emphasis will be on style and meaning 
in art. The class meets for two slide lectures and one small discussion 
group per week. Assignments will include museum visits and study 
of significant works of art in greater Boston. 
Kenneth Craig 
Jeffery Howe 

FA 103-104 Art History Workshop I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Required for art history majors. 

The primary objective of this two-semester course is to expose 
the student to a series of problems in order that he or she may under- 
stand more fully the formal and technical aspects of works of art 
studied in the general survey of art history (FA 101-102). Critiques 
and discussions also try to develop greater aesthetic sensitivity. 
Aileen Callahan 

FA 107 History of Architecture (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

The evolution of architectural styles in the Western world. 
Consideration will be given to the historical, religious, social, political 
and structural problems that influenced development of those styles. 
Josephine von Henneberg 

FA 108 Great Ait Capitals of Europe (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

This course is for artists, art lovers, and travelers. It deals with 
selected works of painting, sculpture and architecture from the fifth- 
century golden age of Athens through the post-impressionism of 
nineteenth century Paris. The course will treat particular monu- 
ments in depth, emphasizing their artistic styles, as well as the ideo- 
logical and social contexts in which they were created. While look- 
ing at the art of the past, we will also consider how it has been inter- 
preted by historians. 
Pamela Berger 

FA 109 Aspects of Art (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

Art can be the stepping stone to the investigation and greater 
understanding of our world. In this course, we explore visual 
objects — paintings, prints, sculptures and buildings — which artists 
make to enrich our environment and expand our awareness of 
important issues. To get the artist's message, we learn the formal and 
aesthetic premises of visual language and the vocabulary of each 
medium. We then approach some of the major issues revealed and 
influenced by art: images of divinity, the effects of patronage, art as 
a political forum, the roles of women, racial imagery, art and science. 
Judith Bookbinder 
FA 176 Jerusalem (Fall: 3) 

Enrollment is limited to 12, with preference given to first year students. 

This seminar will explore the arts and architecture associated 

with millennia from the perspectives of the three great monotheistic 

religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. We will compare the city 



in belief and scripture with the artifact of the city in archeology and 

architecture to see how the role of the city and perceptions of it have 

changed over time. 

Jonathan Bloom 

FA 203 Great Cities of the Islamic Lands (Spring: 3) 

Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

Contrary to common stereotypes, Islam has traditionally been 
an urban culture. Its cities were some of the biggest in medieval 
times, and their products the finest money could buy. This course 
examines a dozen metropolises in the Islamic lands, ranging from 
Damascus in the 7th century to Delhi in the 17th, and their major 
monuments, both architecture and objects. 
Sheila Blair 

FA 210 Eire/Land: Cultural Views (Spring: 3) 

Eire/Land charts the cultural responses to the land in Celtic 
times, and from the late 18th to the 20th centuries. We will trace 
the history and development of Irish landscape painting and read 
key works of literature. The McMuUen Museum exhibition and its 
lecture series will be incorporated into the course. 
Katherine Nahum 

FA 21 1-212 Art of the Ancient Mediterranean World I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with CL 212-213 
Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

The visual history and arts of the Ancient Mediterranean world 
will be studied from the rise of civilizations along the Nile, in the 
Holy Land, and Mesopotamia to the fall of the western Roman 
Empire, about 480. Cities, sacred areas, palaces, and building for 
communication, civic services and war will be included, as well as 
painting, sculpture, jewelry, and coinages. 
The Department 

FA 213 Introduction to Islamic Art and Architecture (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

This course examines the development of Islamic art and archi- 
tecture through a variety of different approaches. In class, we will 
examine a dozen masterpieces of Islamic art and architecture and their 
settings. The examples are drawn from many media, arranged chrono- 
logically and spread geographically throughout the Islamic lands. 
Sheila Blair 

FA 214 The Art of the Silk Road (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

The Silk Road is the term coined in the 19th century for the 
overland trade route that connected China to the Mediterranean via 
Central Asia and Iran. This course surveys the arts and ideas that 
traveled and developed along this trans-continental route over sever- 
al millennia. 
Sheila Blair 

FA 221 Early Medieval Art: Mysteries and Visions (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

This course will illuminate the art of the so-called Dark Ages, 
from about 200 AD to around the year 1000 AD. We will begin 
with the art of the waning classical world where, in addition to the 
burgeoning imagery of early Christianity, one finds the magico-reli- 
gious art of the mystery cults of Cybele, Mithras and Isis. We will 
look at the art of Byzantium, as well as that of Celtic-Early Christian 
Ireland, and then go on to a study of the Carolingian "renaissance." 
The last part of the course will be devoted to the "apocalyptic" mil- 
lennial art of 10th century Spain. 
Pamela j 



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Arts and Sciences 



FA 222 Alt of the Later Medieval Art: Imagination and Imagery 
(Spring: 3) 

This course will look at the symbolism and the multiplicity of 
meanings in works of art from the Romanesque and Gothic world. 
We will study the various artistic styles of architecture, sculpture and 
painting of the period, all the while treating the art in its intellectu- 
al and social context. We will pay particular attention to the new 
ways medieval men and women envisioned space and time, as well 
as God and nature. 
Pamela Berger 

FA 231 Arts of the Italian Renaissance: Quattrocento (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

This course will survey developments in art from the four- 
teenth to the fifteenth century. Painting, sculpture and architecture 
will be considered, and their developments followed in Florence and 
other artistic centers in Central and Northern Italy. Artists to be 
studied will include, among others, Giotto, Masaccio, Donatello, 
Ghiberti, Brunelleschi, Alberti, Botticelli, and Leonardo. 
The Department 
FA 232 Northern Renaissance Art (Spring: 3) 

Painting in the Netherlands and in Germany in the 15th and 
16th centuries. Emphasis will be on the style and the meaning of the 
great works of the masters of Northern Renaissance art such as Jan 
van Eyck, Hieronymus Bosch, Pieter Bruegel, and Albrecht Durer. 
We will discuss how the Renaissance in Northern Europe is different 
from the Italian Renaissance and what influences it absorbed from 
the Italians. We will consider the importance of printed pictures in 
this era when books and broadsheets assumed such a crucial role. 
Kenneth Craig 

FA 238 Renaissance Art and Architecture in Florence (Fall: 3) 
The Department 

FA 251 Modern Architecture (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

This course is about the evolution of modern architectural 
form from the late eighteenth century revival styles to individual 
architects of the twentieth century such as F. L. Wright, Gropius, 
Mies van der Rohe, or Le Corbusier. 
Katherine Nahum 
FA 256 Impressionism and Nee-Impressionism (Spring: 3) 

This course focuses on the development of Impressionism and 
Neo-Impressionism in France, from Monet to Van Gogh. After a 
study of the intellectual and artistic roots of these trends, the style and 
subject matter of individual artists, as well as their relation to the 
social and political history of the time, will be considered. In addi- 
tion, attention is paid to how the interpretation of Impressionism and 
Neo-Impressionism has evolved since the later nineteenth century. 
The Department 

FA 257-258 Modern Art: 19th and 20th Centuries (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

This course is an introduction to art in the Western world from 
the late 18th century to the present. The work of some of the major 
painters and sculptors will be seen in relation to the contemporary 
cultural and political ferment that helped shape it while being shaped 
by it in turn. The fall semester will cover Neoclassicism through 
Impressionism. Artists studied in the first segment include David, 
Goya, Turner, Monet and Rodin. Spring semester begins with Post- 
Impressionism and ends with contemporary art. Artists covered 
include Van Gogh, Matisse, Picasso, Brancusi, Duchamp, and Pollock. 
Claude Cernuschi 
Jejfery Howe 
The Department 



FA 263 Arts in America (Spring: 3) 

The objective of this course is to introduce the student to the 
social, philosophical and formal currents that have contributed to 
the art of this century. Beginning with the last generation of the 
nineteenth century, we will trace the evolution of the visual arts in 
this century up to the present. Somewhat greater emphasis will be 
given to the work done after World War II, when American artists 
began to make their most revolutionary statements. Subjects to be 
considered will include the Ash Can School, Dada, Abstract 
Expressionism, Pop Art and Post Modernism. 
Charles Colbert 

FA 267 From Salt-Box to Skyscraper: Architecture in America 
17th-20th Centuries (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

This course will trace the development of American architec- 
ture from colonial times to the present. Particular attention will be 
paid to monuments in New England, with field trips to important 
buildings in the Boston area. In addition to studying stylistic 
changes, the class will consider the significance of changes in build- 
ing technology and social needs for the history of architecture. 
Jejfery Howe 

FA 285 Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Photographic 
History (Spring: 3) 

This course looks at the evolution of vision and practice 
through a selected survey of the history, technology, and aesthetics of 
photography from the earliest experiments in the medium to the 
present day. We will focus primarily on photographic practice in 
Europe and the USA. In this course, we will investigate the social, 
cultural, and political implications of the revolution of photography, 
paying critical attention to its manipulations within the contexts of 
entertainment, advertising, the state, science, journalism, modern 
and postmodern art. We will also carefully explore our relationship 
with the proliferation of mass media imagery today. 
The Department 
FA 293 The Museum of Art (Spring: 3) 

A study of the emergence of museums of art tracing their devel- 
opment from private and ecclesiastical collections of the middle ages 
to their present form as public institutions. Topics include: the func- 
tion of the the museum in its social context, the constituency of 
museums and their educational mission, the role of the university 
versus the public museum, philosophy of installation and care of col- 
lections, current problems of administration and financing, museum 
architecture as a reflection of changes in function, the art market, 
and questions of authenticity of works of art. 
Nancy Netzer 

FA 314 The Art and Archaeology of Egypt and the Ancient Near 
East (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

This course will examine two of the world's oldest civilizations. 
We will concentrate on the architecture, sculpture, and painting of 
Egypt and on the early cultures of Mesopotamia with frequent ref- 
erence to the broader archaeological contexts of the material. While 
the class will focus on the physical remains of these civilizations, 
ancient literary sources — read in translation — will be employed to 
enrich our understanding. 
Kenneth Craig 
FA 335 Italian Palaces from 1450 to 1650 (Spring: 3) 

In mid-fifteenth-century Florence, the Medici — the city's de 
facto ruling family — built a private palace unprecedented in its 
monumentality. This bold move prompted other wealthy families, 
first in Florence and then in centers like Rome and Venice, to express 



108 



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their status through grand private residences. This seminar will study 
the architecture, painted decoration, and material culture (furniture, 
collections, and objects) of Italian palaces from 1450 to 1650. 
Particular focus will also be placed on the motives and justifications 
behind living "magnificently" in Renaissance and Baroque Italy. 
Stephanie Leone 

FA 356 Art Since 1945 (Spring: 3) 

An analysis of artistic movements from 1945 to the present: 
Abstract Expressionism, Color Field, Neo-Dada, Pop Art, 
Minimalism, Post-Minimalism, Performance Art, Conceptual Art, 
Photo-Realism, Earthworks, Neo-Expressionism, and the more 
recent manifestations of appropriation associated with the 
Postmodern. 
Claude Cernuschi 

FA 406 Independent Study III (Fall: 3) 

Aileen Callahan 

FA 45 1 Symbolism and Decadence at the End of the Century 
(Fall: 3) 

This seminar will be an exploration of the parallels between the 
visual arts and literature of this era. The course will involve study of 
some of the most intriguing artists of the period, such as Gustave 
Moreau, Gauguin, Redon, Fernand Khnopff Edvard Munch and 
Gustav Klimt. Corresponding themes in Symbolist literature will be 
examined to enlarge the context of the inquiry. Readings will include 
works by Baudelaire, Mallarme, Maeterlinck, J.-K Huysmans and 
Oscar Wilde. As Symbolism was truly a multidisciplinary move- 
ment, the sculpture of Rodin and Art Nouveau architecture and dec- 
orative arts will also be included. 
Jejfery Howe 
FA 463 American Houses (Spring: 3) 

A seminar investigating the development of domestic architec- 
ture in America, from wigwams to mansions. Topics will include the 
development of particular styles and building technologies from the 
earhest Native American dwellings to the present. We will study 
regional patterns, the changing role of the builder and architect, and 
the role of new technologies. The changing relationship to European 
architectrue in light of an evolving national identity will also be con- 
sidered. Vernacular, or folk, style buildings will be included as well 
as high style mansions. Prior art history courses or a keen interest in 
architecture is strongly recommended. 
Jejfery Howe 
FA 465 Picasso (Spring: 3) 

This seminar will explore the various facets of Picasso's work 
with special emphasis on the development of analytic and synthetic 
cubism, Picasso's relationship to Surrealism, Neo-Classicism, as well 
as antifascist politics. Picasso's relationship with the old masters as 
well as his anticipation of postmodernism will also be covered. 
Claude Cernuschi 

FA 499 Advanced Independent Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Formerly known as Scholar of the College 

Arts and Sciences students who want the challenge of working 
intensively on a scholarly or creative project of their own design dur- 
ing their senior year should consider applying for this program. The 
application deadline is usually in the late fall of a student's junior 
year. See the Arts and Sciences section of this Catalog or contact the 
Dean's Office for a full description of the requirements. 
The Department 

FA 598 Teaching Assistantships (Spring: 3) 
' Smith 



Undergraduate and Graduate Course Offerings 
FA 3 1 1 Greek Art and Archaeology (Fall: 3) 

The art of the ancient Greeks is the visible testimony of one of 
the great ages of Western civilization. We will study architecture, 
sculpture and painting. This class will consider the art of Minoan, 
Crete, and Mycenae on the mainland of Greece as precursors to Greek 
art. Then we will study Greek art proper from its earliest appearance 
to the end of the Hellenistic period. Archaeological material will be 
covered primarily in relation to the major artistic monuments. 
Kenneth Craig 
FA 327 Early Medieval Art in Ireland and Britain (Fall: 3) 

This seminar will examine the origins and development of art 
in Ireland and Britain in the Early Medieval period and the produc- 
tion of Irish and English missionaries on the Continent. Emphasis 
will be placed on manuscripts, sculpture, and metal work of the sixth 
to the ninth century, on understanding works of art in their histori- 
cal contexts, and on their sources in the Celtic, Germanic and 
Mediterranean worlds. Students of art history, history, medieval 
studies, and Irish Studies are encouraged. 
Nancy Netzer 

FA 332 The Age of Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael 
(Spring: 3) 

The High Renaissance was of relatively brief duration, yet it 
attained a level of creative accomplishment that served as a model for 
generations to come. The works of the leading masters of this era 
will be examined as well as their influence on subsequent artists. 
Josephine von Henneherg 
FA 342 Age of Rembrandt (Fall: 3) 

In the seventeenth century the prosperous Dutch middle class 
became passionate art collectors. Wealthy merchants and tradesmen, 
and even butchers and bakers, bought art of the highest quality and 
displayed it proudly in their homes and shops. The artists living in 
the Netherlands responded by producing wonderful genre pictures, 
landscapes, still lifes and portraits as well as religious and mythologi- 
cal pictures for this, the first free market in the history of art. Among 
the artists we will study are Rembrandt, Jan Vermeer, Frans Hals. 
Kenneth Craig 
FA 347 Age of Baroque (Fall: 3) 

The seventeenth century is one of the great epochs in the his- 
tory of art. The style of this period, the Baroque, found its highest 
expression in the Italian masters such as Caravaggio, the Carracci, 
Bernini, and Borromini. Their powerful works influenced all of 
Europe and profoundly changed the face of the city of Rome. This 
course will discuss the painting, sculpture, and architecture that was 
produced in Italy in the seventeenth century as well as the historical 
environment that nurtured it with particular emphasis on Rome. 
Josephine von Henneberg 
FA 362 American Landscape Painting (Spring: 3) 

This course will concentrate on the aesthetic and social factors 
that endowed landscape painting with a particular importance for a 
civilization that sought to define itself in terms of its environment 
rather than its traditions. Some of the painters we will consider 
include Thomas Cole, Frederick Church, Winslow Homer, the 
American Impressionists, and Edward Hopper. The poetry and prose 
of Bryant, Emerson, Whitman, and Thoreau will also be reviewed. 
Charles Colbert 
FA 401 Seminar in Art Historical Research (Fall: 3) 

The seminar acquaints the student with the bibliography and 
research methods necessary for scholarly work in art history. 
Claude Cernuschi 



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FA 403 Independent Work (Fall: 3) 

This course may be given on an as needed basis to allow stu- 
dents to study a particular topic that is not included in the courses 
that are offered. 
The Department 
FA 404 Independent Work (Spring: 3) 

This course may be given on an as needed basis to allow stu- 
dents to study a particular topic that is not included in the courses 
that are offered. 
The Department 
FA 453 Psychoanalytic Approach to Art (Fall: 3) 

How can art be approached psychoanalytically? The focus of 
this seminar will be on such late 19th century artists as Manet, 
Gauguin, Cezanne and Van Gogh, and those psychoanalytic ideas 
that have been and have yet to be applied to art. Our particular con- 
cern is the lack of attention paid, as Meyer Schapiro and others have 
noted, to art's historical context, iconography and the evolution of 
style, in which the content and formal values of art have been 
ignored. We will explore how the formal means of the artist might 
be psychoanalytically interpreted. 
Katherine Nahum 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
FM 171 Film Making I (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Lab fee required 

How observations and visions are turned into images. How 
images are connected to form ideas. Projects in silent filmmaking, 
shooting, lighting, and editing are included. The course is also about 
film as a form of expression and communication. A class for begin- 
ners. Equipment is provided. 
The Department 
FM 202 Introduction to Film Art (Fall: 3) 

The basic course introduces essential concepts of film tech- 
nique, history and criticism, and supplies the background for more 
advanced work in film studies. It provides some familiarity with the 
artistic, economic, technological and social factors that exerted an 
influence on the development of the medium and the industry to its 
present influential role in cultures today. 
Richard A. Blake, S.J. 

FM 216 Shooting Nazis: German Film from 1933-1945 (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with GM 216 
Conducted in English. 

See course description in the German Studies Department. 
Rachel Freudenburg 
FM 273 Film Making II (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Filmmaking I or permission of the instructor 
Lab fee required 

This course is designed for students who want to make movies. 
Using state-of-art sound film cameras, students develop topics, 
shoot, and edit their own films. Emphasis is on demystifying the 
filmmaking process. Equipment is provided. 
The Department 

FM 274 Digital Non-Linear Editing (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Department permission 
Cross listed with CO 224 
Limited to 10 students. 

This course will provide the fundamental skills required for edit- 
ing moving pictures as well as hands-on experience on the Avid non- 
linear edit system. The Avid Media Composer is currently considered 



a standard tool in the video, television, and film industry. Using the 
system, students will learn the basics of pacing, continuity and elec- 
tronic storytelling by producing and editing their own material. They 
will also master the latest techniques in digitizing, organizing "bins" 
and "clips," building a timeline, saving sequences, and output to tape. 
James Ferguson 
Carl Schmidt 
FM 280 American Film History I: The Early Years (Fall: 3) 

A survey of the social, artistic, cultural, technological and eco- 
nomic foundations of the American motion picture industry serves 
as the background for the study of several of the most important 
directors of the silent era, like Chaplin, Griffith, Keaton and 
Flaherty, their audiences and the social impact of their work. The 
introduction of sound will include some early films of Frank Capra. 
Richard A. Blake, S.J. 
FM 281 American Film History II: The Studio Years (Spring: 3) 

During the period from the introduction of sound until the 
1950's, eight large corporations controlled Hollywood film produc- 
tion and national distribution. A study of the films of Ford, Hawks, 
Welles, Hitchcock and Huston investigates the emergence of these 
key individual artists within the corporate structure of the industry. 
Their films are viewed in their social context, as reflections of chang- 
ing mores, the Depression and World War II. 
Richard A. Blake, S.J. 
FM 282 Political Fiction Film (Fall: 3) 

Political fiction film has often served as a dramatic means to 
deliver an ideological message. Its roots go back to Griffith's Civil War 
epic Birth of a Nation (1915). During World War II with such popu- 
lar films as Casablanca, Hollywood directors offered patriotic messages 
to an American audience with its recent history of isolationism. More 
recently, Costa-Gavras' Z (1969) combined thriller elements with a 
non-conventional political perspective. Through readings, screenings, 
and discussion of these and other works, we are able to analyze the 
dual components of drama and politics in a chronological manner 
John Michalczyk 

FM 283 History of European Cinema (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

Using a survey approach, the course examines the principal 
movements of Expressionism in Germany, Neo-realism in Italy, and 
the New Wave in France with an occasional maverick film that 
becomes monumental in the history of cinema. 
John Michalczyk 
FM 297 Irish Political Film (Fall: 3) 

The recent "Troubles," or the socio-political unrest in 
Northern Ireland from the civil rights movement of the Sixties to the 
promising Good Friday Accords of 1998, have been graphically cap- 
tured in film. This course will offer a study of social, religious, and 
political issues with a focus on conflict resolution. From the post- 
World War 1 struggles of Michael Collins to the current return of the 
paramilitary prisoners into society, it will trace Ireland's evolving 
socio-political history. 
John Michalczyk 
FM 301 Screenwriter (Spring: 3) 

This course explores the role of the screenwriter in the film mak- 
ing process, from original story idea to the finished screenplay and film. 
Students learn about each of the elements of screenwriting, including: 
structure; creating character; the role of dialogue in film; theme and 
message; genre; and rule breaking. Students will read screenplays and 
analyze films to gain a better understanding of how those elements 
work in combination and contribute to the final project. 
Drew Yanno 



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FM 303 Advanced Screen Writing (Spring: 3) 
Limited to 15 students. 

Prerequisite: FM 301 Screenwriter 

This course is for students interested in writing for film. 
Students will apply the knowledge gained in FM 301 to write their 
own screenplays. Film Studies majors and minors will be given prefer- 
ence in enrolling. Students will select an idea for a film and transform 
that idea into a story suitable for the screen. Students will critically 
examine each other's ideas/stories and move on to outline their script. 
Drew Yanno 

FM 312 World Cinema (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Ctdtural Diversity Requirement 

This course provides the opportunity for students to explore 
films from regions other than Europe and North America. Films of 
Asia, Africa or the Middle East would serve as a focus for the course. 
Special attention is given to the social, economic, cultural and polit- 
ical contexts from which these films arise, both in the country of ori- 
gin and in the West. 
Bo Smith 
FM 384 History and Art History into Film (Fall: 3) 

This course will provide an introduction to the creation of 
authentic historical films. We will start with an exploration of the 
kinds of historical and art-historical sources that could be inspira- 
tional for scripting, and go on to look at the scripting process itself 
Then students will be introduced to script breakdown, location 
scouting, production design and the making of production boards. 
Each student will undertake a research project related to the props, 
costumes, or architectural settings that are needed for the creation of 
a specific historical film. 
Pamela Berger 
FM 391 American Film Genres (Fall: 3) 

This course will provide a critical method for analyzing the film 
genres that were characteristic of the American film from the intro- 
duction of sound to 1950's. It will include such topics as the 
Screwball Comedy, the Western, the Musical, the Gangster Film, the 
Film Noir and the Horror Film. 
Richard Blake, S.J. 
FM 392 American Film History III (Spring: 3) 

After the court-mandated demise of the old studio system 
beginning in 1948, the industry entered a period of independent 
production, media conglomerates and television production. A sur- 
vey of historiographical methods addresses the problems of creating 
a film history that accounts for these on-going changes in the indus- 
try. The films of Scorsese, Coppola, Allen, Airman and DePalma 
illustrate the response of the post-studio generation to the new real- 
ities of Hollywood and its audiences. 
Richard A. Blake, S.J. 
FM 440 Independent Work (Spring: 3) 

This course may be given on an as needed basis to allow stu- 
dents to study a particular topic that is not included in the courses 
that are offered. 
The Department 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
FS 101 Drawing I: Foundations (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Fine Arts Core Requirement 
Lab fee required 

The use of line, plane, and volume is explored to develop the 
student's comprehension of pictorial space and understanding of the 



formal properties inherent in picture making. Class work, critiques, 

and discussions will be used to expand the student's preconceived 

ideas about art. This course incorporates historical components and 

writing assignments. 

Mary Sherman 

Michael Mulhem 

Andrew Tavarelli 

Khalid Kodi 

John Steczynski 

FS 102 Painting I: Foundations (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Satisfies Fine Arts Core Requirement 

Lab fee required 

This is an introduction to the materials, methods and vocabu- 
lary of painting. The course uses observation and learning to see as 
the cornerstone for painting, but involves abstraction as well as rep- 
resentation. The emphasis is on making the painting come alive 
rather than on copying. Students are expected to paint in class as 
well as at home. Critiques, slide lectures, and museum visits are inte- 
gral parts of the course. This course incorporates historical compo- 
nents and writing assignments. 
Mary Armstrong 
Alston Conley 
Khalid Kodi 
Mary Sherman 

FS 103 Drawing: Issues and Approaches (Fall: 3) 
This course is intended for Studio Majors, Studio Minors, and 
serious students with previous drawing experience. 

This course enables students to develop skills and ideas by 
exploring objective, subjective, and conceptual approaches to a variety 
of materials, tools and methods. Practical exercises include working 
from the live model, scenarios, memory and the imagination. Students 
develop skills and confidences by exploring a variety of ideas and tech- 
niques in preparation for a more individually directed approach in 
subsequent courses. Discussion and group or individual critiques 
develop students' critical and analytical skills and provide an open 
forum for students to bring questions and problems for exploration. 
Michael Mulhem 
John Steczynski 

FS 141-142 Ceramics I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Lab fee required 

This course will deal with all phases of ceramics from slab con- 
struction to bowl making and a good deal of effort will go into con- 
sidering a variety of sculptural possibilities at a foundation level. 
This course covers the broadest range of ceramic techniques and 
information. The emphasis in the second semester will be on com- 
bining the various techniques and concepts acquired previously into 
a working order, as well as an exposure to additional technical and 
conceptual information. Those students starting ceramics in second 
semester will be given individual assistance in beginning techniques. 
Mark Cooper 

FS 146 Sculpture Projects (Fall: 3) 
(Studio Majors and Minors only) 

In the last twenty-five years artists have turned to every type of 
material imaginable in their efforts to produce sculpture and installa- 
tion. Artists like Anthony Goldsworthy, Janine Antoni, Tony Craig, 
Jessica Stockholder, and Judy Pfaff have used found materials, tele- 
phone wire, chocolate, lard, and piles of rocks to make their art. Other 
artists like Thomas Schutte and Kiki Smith have recontexternalized the 
traditional approach to figure sculpture. This course will address and 
develop these approaches through individual projects and research. 
Mark Cooper 



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FS 161 Photography I (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Lab fee required 

Topics to be covered include exposure, fdm development, 
printmaking and mounting for exhibition. Class time will be devot- 
ed to slide lectures on the work of historical and contemporary pho- 
tographers, critiques of student work, and darkroom demonstra- 
tions. Emphasis will be placed on helping each student realize a per- 
sonal way of seeing. Students will have weekly shooting and printing 
assignments. Please bring camera to first class. 
Karl Baden 
Charles Meyer 
Sharon Sabin 

FS 201 Drawing/ Another Dimension (Spring: 3) 
Michael Mulhern 

FS 203 Drawing II: Perspective and Tone (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: FS 101 or permission of the instructor 
Lab fee required 

A skills course that uses the classical academic drawing tradi- 
tion as a discipline to integrate intellectual analysis, visual accuracy 
and manual control through the free-hand rendering of primarily 
geometric objects. Students are expected to master proportion, fore- 
shortening and volumetric and spatial representation through 
applied perspective and modeling and shading in a variety of media. 
John Steczynski 

FS 204 Drawing III: Introduction to the Figure (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: FS 203 or permission of the instructor 
Lab fee required 

The course uses a sequence of observation and analytical prob- 
lems focusing on elements and aspects of the human body to lead to 
working from the live model. Expressive and experimental 
approaches are encouraged. 
John Steczynski 

FS 206 Large Scale Drawing in Another Dimension (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: FS 101 or permission of instructor 

Beginning where Drawing I leaves off with the issue of scale, 
this course will investigate the problems of the miniature and the 
gigantic, the sketch and the "cartoon." Through a theme or series of 
drawings, students will be encouraged to explore individual direc- 
tions in relation to subject matter and personal intent. Critiques, dis- 
cussions and slide presentations are an integral part of the studio ses- 
sions and students are expected to participate in these. Significant 
work outside of class will be expected. 
Michael Mulhern 

FS 223-224 Painting II and III (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: FS 101-102 or permission of the instructor 

The course focuses on the acquisition of basic painting skills 
and on the attitudes, awareness, and satisfactions that accompany 
this experience. Students will explore still life, figure painting, land- 
scape and abstraction. Although class time is primarily spent paint- 
ing, there are frequent discussions, critiques, and slide presentations 
of paintings. It is suggested that students have some familiarity with 
and interest in painting or drawing before electing the course. 
Mary Armstrong 

FS 225 Watercolor I (Fall: 3) 
Lab fee required 

Students are introduced to the painting materials and tech- 
niques of watercolor. Assignments in class are designed to expand the 
student's visual thinking. Class time includes painting from still life, 
the figure and landscape, critiques and slide presentations. Previous 
drawing experience is recommended. 
Andrew Tavarelli 



FS 226 Colored Works on Paper (Spring: 3) 
Lab fee required 

This course is an introduction to and exploration of various 
color media on paper. We will use watercolor, pastel, oil stick, ink, 
crayon and colored pencils. We will investigate each of these medi- 
um's particular characteristics and expressive potential. By working 
with still life, collage, landscape and the figure, students will have the 
opportunity to gain experience in seeing, drawing and all aspects of 
picture making. The link and continuity between abstraction and 
observation will be stressed. 
Andrew Tavarelli 

FS 261 Photography II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: FS 161 or permission of the instructor 
Lab fee required 

This course is for students with a strong commitment to pho- 
tography as a creative discipline. The class will emphasize under- 
standing and mastering the aesthetic and technical relationships 
among light, film, and camera, as well as the development of a per- 
sonal photographic vision. The class will serve as a forum for cri- 
tiquing work, for presenting historical and contemporary movements 
in photography and the development of a visual literacy, and for 
demonstrating photographic processes and equipment. Students are 
expected to produce work in a series and to present a final portfolio. 
Charles Meyer 

FS 267 Experimental Photography (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: FS 161 or permission of the instructor 
Lab fee required 

This will be a one-semester course for those interested in pho- 
tography as a personally expressive medium. Encouragement will be 
given to the student artist through non-standard application of pho- 
tographic principles. Topics available for discussion include Sabettier 
effect, high contrast, hand-applied color, toning, photogram, multi- 
ple printing, and reticulation. Significant work outside class will be 
expected. 
Karl Baden 

FS 276 Art and Digital Technology (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with CO 204 

This introductory course will offer students the opportunity to 
develop their visual imagination and their artistic skills through the 
use of digital technology. Adobe Photoshop and preliminary work 
with Illustrator will offer the principles of composition and two- 
dimensional design. Computer-aided drawing and design, as well as 
photo imaging, will be an integral part of the course. The various 
skills of graphic expression learned in the course will have an 
Internet application. 
Karl Baden 

FS 325 Studio/Contemporary Issues (Spring: 3) 
This class is a requirement for Studio Art minors. 

This course comprises hands on studio work and readings that 
address contemporary issues in the visual arts. It is an upper level 
class for those with a serious interest in art making and visual think- 
ing. Students are expected to work in a medium of their choice with 
which they are familiar. Studio assignments will be developed out of 
the issues explored in the readings. Students are expected to produce 
a body of studio work and to make an oral presentation that situates 
their work in relation to the topics under investigation. 
Michael Mulhern 

FS 352 Stage Design I (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with CT 352 

This course will concentrate on set design for the stage. We will 
study the evolution of theatre architecture and the development of 



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dramatic forms, various design problems, and research possibilities. 
This will include some basic work at script analysis from the per- 
spective of a designer. The student will learn the techniques of draft- 
ing, rendering, and model-making, skills that then are used to create 
a culminating final design project. 
Crystal Tiala 

FS 361 Photography III (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: FS 161, FS 261, FS 267 

This is an advanced production course in photography explor- 
ing both its documentary qualities and its symbolic potential. This 
course is for students who have a strong technical background in 
photography and an interest in exploring the medium as a means of 
visual expression. We will investigate the interrelationships of subject 
matter, approach, and technical decisions, and aesthetics. Students 
will be expected to develop their own project ideas, to work in series 
as well as in group projects. 
Charles Meyer 
FS 498 Senior Project (Fall: 3) 

This course is required of all Studio Art majors. Students must 
have taken at least four semesters of work relating to their project 
prior to the senior year. It is directed by a member of the 
Department and evaluated by Departmental review. 
Andrew Tavarelli 

Undergraduate and Graduate Course Offerings 
FS 301-302 Drawing IV and V: Figure (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: FS 204 or permission of the instructor 
Lab fee required 

The course uses the human figure to expand the student's abil- 
ities in the direction of more expressive and more individualized 
drawing skills. In addition to working from the live model in class, 
the first semester includes anatomical studies, and the second semes- 
ter stresses stylistic and spatial experimentation — seeing the figure as 
a component within a total composition. 
John Steczynski 

FS 323 Painting FV: Landscape (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: FS 223-224 or permission of the instructor 
Lab fee required 

Nature and landscape will provide us with painting imagery 
throughout the semester. Students will paint directly from the local 
landscape and these paintings will serve as source material for large- 
scale studio paintings. This class is designed for advanced students 
who are familiar with the fundamentals of painting and wish to 
broaden and strengthen this foundation. Students will be encour- 
aged to develop a personal vision and are free to work abstractly or 
representationally. 
Elizabeth Await 

FS 324 Painting V: Figure (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: FS 223-224 or permission of the instructor 
Lab fee required 

This advanced painting course introduces the student to the 
concept of extracting and abstracting images from life most notably 
from the figure. Students will strengthen their observational and 
technical skills by painting directly from the model. As the semester 
advances students may incorporate additional figurative imagery, 
culled from photographs and media imagery, into their paintings. At 
the conclusion of the semester the figure in the landscape may be 
introduced. It is assumed that students are working towards devel- 
oping a personal vision upon entering this class and they will be free 
to work either representationally or abstractly. 
Andrew Tavarelli 



FS 385-386, 485-486 Independent Work I, II, III, IV 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: Department permission 

A course allowing students who have sufficient background to 
progress to a higher level or in a more specialized area than other 
courses allow. The student works independently, under the direction 
of a member of the Department. 
The Department 
FS 473 Senior Project II (Spring: 3) 

This course is required of all Studio Art majors. Students must 
have taken at least four semesters of work relating to their project 
prior to the senior year. It is directed by a member of the department 
and evaluated by departmental review. 
Andrew Tavarelli 

FS 598 Teaching Assistantship (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Michael Civille 

Geology and Geophysics 

Faculty 

George D. Brown, Jr., Professor Emeritus; B.S., St. Joseph's 

College; M.S., University of Illinois at Urbana; Ph.D., Indiana 

University 

James W. Skehan, S.J., Professor Emeritus; A.B., A.M., Boston 

College; Ph.L., Weston College; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University; 

S.T.B., S.T.L., Weston College 

John F. Devane, S.J., Assistant Professor Emeritus; A.B., M.A., 

Boston College; Ph.D., Fordham University 

Emanuel G. Bombolakis, Professor; B.S., M.S., Colorado School 

of Mines; Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

John E. Ebel, Professor; A.B., Harvard University; Ph.D., 

California Institute of Technology 

J. Christopher Hepburn, Professor; A.B., Colgate University; 

A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

David C. Roy, Professor; B.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Rudolph Hon, Associate Professor; M.Sc, Charles University; 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Alan L. Kafka, Associate Professor; Chairperson of the Department; 

B.A., New York University; M.S., Ph.D., State University of New 

York at Stony Brook 

Gail C. Kineke, Associate Professor; B.A., Princeton University; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Washington 

Kevin G. Ylatrisoa, Assistant Professor; B.A., Brown University; 

M.S., Scripps Institute; M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 

David P. Lesmes, Assistant Professor; B.A., University of California, 

San Diego; Ph.D., Texas A&M University 

Departmental Notes 

• Administrative Secretary: Angelina Di Pietro, 
617-552-3641 or 3640, dipietro@bc.edu 

• Director of Undergraduate Studies: Dr. Kevin G. 
Harrison, harriskg@bc.edu 

• Director of Graduate Studies: Dr. John E. Ebel, 
ebel@bc.edu 

• Department Chairperson: Dr. Alan L. Kafka, 
kafka@bc.edu 

• World Wide Web: http://www.bc.edu/geology 

Undergraduate Program Description 

An undergraduate in the Department of Geology and 
Geophysics may develop a major program in one of the department's 
four majors: Geology, Geophysics, a combination of Geology and 
Geophysics, or Environmental Geosciences. Within the constraints 



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discussed below, programs can be individually designed to meet the 
interests and objectives of each student. Students may wish to major 
or to have a concentration in the earth sciences for a variety of rea- 
sons including (1) a desire to work professionally in one of the earth 
sciences, (2) a desire to obtain an earth science foundation prepara- 
tory for post-graduate work in environmental studies, resource man- 
agement, environmental law, or similar fields where such a back- 
ground would be useful, (3) a desire to teach earth science in sec- 
ondary schools, or (4) a general interest in the earth sciences. 

Earth scientists, geologists, geophysicists and environmental 
scientists study the earth's complex systems and interrelations with 
the hydrosphere, biosphere and atmosphere. Students trained in the 
earth sciences can look forward to exciting and rewarding careers as 
society will require ever larger amounts of energy and natural 
resources in the 21st century, and at the same time, face increasing 
environmental problems and concerns. The department provides 
students with the skills and varied background needed to address 
these problems. Earth scientists are naturally interdisciplinary and 
use science to solve real problems. Today's earth scientist can choose 
to work in the field in almost any area of the world, or in ultra-mod- 
ern laboratories equipped with the latest computing equipment, or 
commonly in some combination of these. 

Whether exploring for petroleum thousands of feet below the 
surface of the ocean, using geophysics to better understand earth- 
quakes in relation to city or emergency planning, or working with 
governmental agencies or industry to analyze pollution plumes, the 
earth sciences provide exciting possibilities. 
Department Honors Program 

Any major in the department may elect to enroll in the 
Department Honors Program, provided a satisfactory scholastic aver- 
age has been maintained (3.3 in the major, 3.2 overall). Application to 
the program should be made in the spring of the junior year. Each 
applicant must have a faculty advisor to supervise the proposed 
research project. Honors will be awarded upon (1) successful comple- 
tion of a thesis based upon the proposed research project as evaluated 
by the faculty advisor, and (2) approval of the thesis and the candi- 
date's academic record by the Undergraduate Program Committee. 

Students in the department are urged to fulfill at least one of 
the elective courses in any major program with a project-oriented 
research course during their senior year. Students may propose sub- 
stitutes for particular course requirements by a petition, in writing, 
to the departmental Undergraduate Program Committee. 
Minor in Geology and Geophysics 

In addition to the four major programs listed below, a student 
may choose to minor in the department. The minor is designed to 
be flexible and to allow the interested student to explore an area of 
interest in the earth sciences without the formal commitment of a 
major. Students interested in declaring a minor in the department 
are urged to see Professor Kevin G. Harrison, departmental advisor 
for this program, as early in their undergraduate careers as possible. 

A minor in the Department of Geology and Geophysics con- 
sists of a minimum of six (6) courses in the department structured 
as follows: 

(A) Two required courses: 

• Exploring the Earth I: Origin and Systems (GE 132) 
and lab 
Earth Materials (GE 220) and lab 

(B) Two additional departmental courses numbered 100 or 
higher 

(C) One additional 200-level departmental course 

(D) One additional course numbered 300 or higher 



With the exception of GE 132 and GE 220, which are required 
for all minors, a higher numbered course can be substituted for a 
lower-level course. Each student's minor program must be approved 
in advance by the faculty advisor in the Department of Geology and 
Geophysics. Students should be aware that many upper-level cours- 
es have prerequisites in Geology, Mathematics, Physics or 
Chemistry. Consult the Boston College catalog, or the departmental 
advisor and keep in mind that these prerequisites must be considered 
in designing a specific minor program. 

The minor program allows students flexibility in their choice of 
courses. Minor programs can be designed to emphasize specific areas 
of concentration within the broad range of subjects in geology and 
geophysics. 
Major Requirements: Environmental Geosciences 

This program serves as an excellent major for students who 
wish to concentrate in the sciences, but who may not be looking 
toward professional careers as scientists, as well as for students plan- 
ning graduate work in environmental studies. 

Students concentrating in Environmental Geosciences should 
work out their programs closely with a departmental advisor to 
insure both breadth and depth in this subject area. Students in this 
major must complete the following course requirements: A total of 
1 courses in the Department of Geology and Geophysics, no more 
than four of which may be at the 100 level. These courses must 
include: 

(A) Each of the following four courses: 

• Environmental Geosciences I (GE 167) 

• Exploring the Earth I: Origin and Systems with laboratory 
(GE 132*-133) 

• Earth Materials with laboratory (GE 220-221) 

• Environmental Geology with laboratory (GE 250-251) 

*GE 115 or GE 197 plus laboratory (GE 133) may substitute 
for GE 132-133 upon petition to, and approval by, the depart- 
mental Undergraduate Committee. 

(B) Two courses from among the following: 
Exploring the Earth II: Structure and Internal Processes (GE 1 34) 
Geologic Hazards of Volcanoes, Landslides, and Earthquakes 
(GE 143) 

Oceanography I and/or II (GE 157 and/or GE 160) 
Environmental Geosciences II (GE 168) 
Weather, Climate and Environment (GE 172) 
Global Warming (GE 175) 
Geoscience and Public Policy (GE 187) 
Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (GE 264) 

(C) At least two courses from among the following: 
Environmental Hydrology (GE 297) 
Geochemistry (GE 302) 
Petrology I (GE 372) 
Petrology II (GE 374) 
Environmental Geochemistry (GE 392) 
Statistical Analysis of Scientific Data (GE 398) 
River and Lake Environments (GE 400) 
Site Characterization, Remediation, and Long Term 
Monitoring for Hazardous Waste Sites (GE 410) 
Biogeochemistry of the Habitable Planet (GE 465) 
Geographical Information Systems (CIS) (GE 480) 
Coastal Processes (GE 535) 

(D) These electives may include courses in the department 
numbered 300 or above to be chosen by the student with his or 
her advisor, or they may include courses from outside the 
Department, approved by the departmental Undergraduate 
Program Committee, such as the following: 



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• Environmental Biology (BI 209) 

• Coastal Field Ecology (BI 443) 

• Environmental Economics (EC 378) 

• Environmental Law (PO 307) 

(E) A full year (2 semesters) of another laboratory science in 
chemistry, physics, or biology from among the following: 
Chemistry (CH 109-110 with laboratory CH 111-112) or 
(CH 117-118 with laboratory CH 119-120); Physics (PH 183- 
184 with laboratory PH 101-102) or (PH 209-210 with labo- 
ratory PH 203-204) or (PH 21 1-212 with laboratory PH 203- 
204); or Biology (BI 200-202 with laboratory BI 210-211). 
Students are encouraged to take additional courses in mathe- 
matics (calculus), chemistry, physics, and biology. Therefore, one 
semester of a laboratory science in addition to (E) above, or Calculus 
(MT 101 or MT 103), may be counted as one of the electives in (D) 
above. Other courses in the University pertinent to the 
Environmental Geosciences major may be substituted for the above 
requirements upon petition to, and approval by, the departmental 
Undergraduate Program Committee. 

Information for First Year Environmental Geoscience Majors and 
Non-Majors 

For those students who would like to explore the major in 
Environmental Geosciences, it is suggested that Environmental 
Geosciences I (GE 167) be taken during the first year and that 
Exploring the Earth I: Origins and Systems (GE 132) be taken dur- 
ing the second year. Environmental Geosciences I and II will satisfy 
the Core requirement in Natural Sciences. 

For example, Environmental Geosciences majors should take 
the following courses: 

Environmental Geosciences I: Resources and Pollution (GE 
167), fall semester, first year. Exploring the Earth I: Origins and 
Systems (GE 132), may be taken either freshmen or sophomore year. 
The Laboratory Science requirement (E above) may be taken in 
either freshmen or sophomore year. 
Major Requirements: Geology 

Students majoring in Geology need to complete the following 
courses, with a total often (10) courses in the department: 

(A) Students majoring in Geology must take the following 
seven (7) courses: 

• Exploring the Earth I and II (GE 132-134) with labora- 
tories (GE 133-135) 

Earth Materials (GE 220) 

• Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (GE 264) 
Petrology I and II (GE 372 and GE 374) 

• Structural Geology I (GE 285) 

(B) At least three (3) additional electives (with a minimum of 
two numbered 300 or above) in the department to bring the 
total number of departmental courses to ten (10). 

(C) Also required is a minimum of 

• Two semesters of Calculus (MT 102 and MT 103) or their 
near equivalent (MT 100, MT 101) 

• Two semesters of Physics using Calculus (PH 209-210 or PH 
211-212) 

• Two semesters of Chemistry with laboratory (CH 109-110 or 
CH 117-118) 

(D) The department strongly advises that mathematics courses 
beyond MT 1 03 be taken such as those required for the 
Geology-Geophysics major listed below. Also recommended is a 
geology summer field course for anyone planning a professional 
career in geology. Credit from a summer field course may be used 
for one of the 300 level Department electives upon written 



approval of the departmental Undergraduate Program 

Committee prior to taking the field course. 

Elective courses both within and outside the department 
should be determined by the student and his or her advisor. 
Alternatives to this program may be substituted upon petition to 
and approval by the departmental Undergraduate Program 
Committee. 
Information for First Year Geology Majors 

The following courses are recommended for First Year majors, 
if their schedules permit. 

• Exploring the Earth I and II with laboratories (GE 132 and 
GE 134) 

• General Chemistry with laboratories (CH 109-1 10, or CH 
117-118) 

Calculus (MT 102-103) 
Major Requirements: Geophysics 

Students majoring in Geophysics need to fulfill the following 
course requirements: 

(A) Students must take the following four (4) courses: 

• Exploring the Earth I and II with laboratories (GE 132 and 
GE 134) 

Earth Materials (GE 220) 

• Structural Geology I (GE 285) 

(B) Four (4) courses from the following list, with at least two 
(2) in Geophysics*: 

Petrology I (GE 372) 
Petrology II (GE 374) 

• Structural Geology II (GE 385) 

• Introduction to Geophysics (GE 391) 

• Hydrogeology (GE 418) 

• Environmental Geophysics (GE 424) 

• Exploration Seismology (GE 655) 

• Engineering Geology (GE 470) 

• Geophysical Data Processing (GE 572) 

• Physics of the Earth (GE 672) 

*A geology or geophysics summer field camp may be substituted 
for one of the courses in (B) above. 

(C) Two (2) additional electives approved in advance by the 
student's advisor. 

• The two (2) may be in departmental courses numbered 400 
or above, or in advanced courses in physics or mathematics 
beyond those required below. 

• This requirement may be fulfilled by a combination of cours- 
es, such as one (1) advanced departmental course and one (1) 
advanced physics course, etc. 

In addition to the required courses listed above, the outside sci- 
ence requirements for the Geophysics major are as follows: 

• One year of Chemistry with laboratory (CH 109-110 or CH 
117-118) 

Calculus through MT 305 (usually MT 102, 103, 202 and 
305) 

• Introduction to Physics with Calculus (PH 209-210 or PH 
211-212) 

Courses in Computer Science and additional electives in geol- 
ogy are recommended in the elective program. Elective courses both 
within and outside the Department should be determined by the 
student and his or her advisor. Alternatives to this program may be 
substituted upon petition to and approval by, the departmental 
Undergraduate Program Committee. 



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Information for First Year Majors 

The following courses are recommended for First Year 
Geophysics Majors, if their schedules permit: Exploring the Earth I 
and II (GE 132 and GE 134) with labs, General Chemistry (CH 
109-110 or CH 117-118) with labs, and Calculus (MT 102-103). 
Major Requirements: Geology-Geophysics 

This major combines elements of both the Geology and the 
Geophysics programs and is considered excellent preparation for 
those working toward graduate school or employment in industry 
following graduation with a B.S. degree. 

(A) Students majoring in Geology-Geophysics will meet the 
following course requirements: 

• Exploring the Earth I and II (GE 132 and GE 134) with lab- 
oratories 

Earth Materials (GE 220 with GE 221) 
Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (GE 264) 
Structural Geology I (GE 285) 
Hydrogeology (GE 418) 
Environmental Geophysics (GE 424) 

(B) Three (3) courses from the following list, with at least one 
in geophysics, approved by the student's advisor: 

Petrology I (GE 372) 

Petrology II (GE 374) 

Structural Geology II (GE 385) 

Introduction to Geophysics (GE 391) 

Exploration Seismology (GE 655) 

Biogeochemistry of the Habitable Planet (GE 465) 

Engineering Geology (GE 470) 

Geographical Information Systems CIS (GE 480) 

Geophysical Data Processing (GE 572) 

Physics of the Earth (GE 672) 

(C) Each of the following: 

Two semesters of Chemistry with laboratories (CH 109-110 
orCH 117-118) 

Calculus through MT 305 (usually MT 102, 103, 202 and 305) 
Introduction to Physics with Calculus (PH 209-210 or 21 1-212) 
Courses in computer science and a summer field geology 

course are highly recommended in the elective program, as is a 
senior year research project. 

The student should plan a program in consultation with his or 
her advisor. Alternatives to this program may be substituted upon 
petition to and approval by the departmental Undergraduate 
Program Committee. 
Information for First Year Geology-Geophysics Majors 

The following courses are recommended for First Year 
Geology-Geophysics majors if their schedules permit: 

• Exploring the Earth I and II (GE 132 and GE 134) with lab- 
oratories 

• General Chemistry (CH 109-110) with laboratories 
Calculus (MT 102-103) 

Fulfilling the Core Requirements 

Core courses in the department are designed to give non-sci- 
ence majors an introduction to aspects of the earth's history and 
dynamics. The course offerings include a wide variety of subjects and 
approaches that reflect the breadth of the earth sciences. This vari- 
ability provides maximum freedom of choice for introductory stu- 
dents. All courses presume no prior knowledge of the science and all 
fulfill the Natural Science Core requirement. They are designed to 
acquaint students with some exciting aspect of the world we live in 
while providing a background in the methods of analysis and rea- 
soning common to all science. GE 115, 125, 132, 134, 180 and 197 



are courses that provide insight into the wide scope of geological 
subjects; the other Core offerings cover more specific sub-fields, like 
Oceanography, Planetary Geology, Astronomy, Evolution, etc. 
Students wishing to find out more about Geology and Geophysics 
Core courses should call the department at 617-552-3640 (Devlin 
Hall 2 1 3) or see Professor Kevin Harrison (Devlin Hall 318). 
Information for Study Abroad 

Since the department has four majors, the prerequisites for 
study abroad vary with each individual major. Depending on the 
student's study plan and courses available in the foreign school, the 
department can be quite flexible. Most importantly, students should 
work out their program, in advance, with a departmental advisor 
and the Undergraduate Program Committee (contact Professor 
Kevin G. Harrison). 

Although there are no set prerequisites, students should gener- 
ally have the following courses completed prior to studying abroad: 
Geology and Geology & Geophysics majors: GE 132, 134 and 220; 
a year of calculus and a year of either chemistry or physics. 
Geophysics majors: GE 132, 134, and 200; 3 semesters of calculus 
and a year of physics. Environmental Geosciences majors: GE 167, 
132, and 220. It would also be helpful if students have a year of 
either physics, chemistry, or biology completed. 

There is no limit on the number of courses that can be 
approved as long as the courses are approved in advance by the 
Undergraduate Program Committee or the department Chairper- 
son. Whether or not courses from foreign institutions will be count- 
ed toward major credit depends entirely upon the school they are 
attending and the offerings at that particular university. Courses 
taken abroad are generally used as major electives. The department 
believes strongly that an abroad program is very worthwhile, expos- 
ing students to not only other cultures, but other physical environ- 
ments and geological situations. The department will try to be as 
flexible as possible to allow students the opportunity to study 
abroad. Based on prior student experience, the department recom- 
mends programs in Australia and Ecuador 

Students must contact Professor J. Christopher Hepburn to 
plan their semester or year abroad. 

Graduate Program Description 
Master of Science 

The department offers graduate courses and research programs 
leading to the M.S. degree in Geology or Geophysics. Students are 
encouraged to obtain broad backgrounds by taking courses in geol- 
ogy, geophysics and environmental areas and the other sciences and 
mathematics. Multidisciplinary preparation is particularly useful for 
students seeking future employment in industry. 

The department, with approximately 25 graduate students in 
residence, is housed in Devlin Hall and has additional research facil- 
ities at Weston Observatory. Students enjoy close working relation- 
ships with faculty while being able to undertake research using the 
most modern scientific equipment available. The program stresses a 
strong background in the earth sciences, as well as the ability to carry 
out research. It prepares students for successful careers as geoscien- 
tists in industry, oil exploration or government service, or continued 
studies toward a Ph.D. A particularly beneficial aspect of the M.S. 
program is the opportunity for students to integrate studies in geol- 
ogy, geophysics and environmental subjects. 

Research in the department covers a broad range of topics, 
including: Coastal and Estuarine Processes, Physical Sedimentation, 
Earthquake and Exploration Seismology, Structural Geology, 



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Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology and Geochemistry, Global 
Change Geochemistry, Interpretative Tectonics, Groundwater 
Hydrology, and Environmental Geology and Geophysics. 

The department offers a number of Teaching and Research 
Assistantships. 
Application 

Applicants to the Master of Science degree program generally 
fall into one of the following categories: (1) students well-prepared in 
geology or geophysics with courses in mathematics, physics, chem- 
istry, and/or biology who are interested in broadening their experi- 
ence at the M.S. degree level before employment or doctoral studies 
elsewhere; (2) students well-prepared in mathematics or one of the 
natural sciences other than geology or geophysics and who wish to 
use the M.S. degree program to transfer into the earth sciences. 

In addition to the normal application forms, applicants should 
submit transcripts, letters of recommendation, a personal evaluation 
of the strengths and weaknesses of their undergraduate education 
(including course and non-course experience), and their graduate 
study interests and current post-degree plans. Graduate Record Exam 
(general) scores are required and we strongly encourage a subject 
GRE in the applicant's undergraduate area of concentration. 
Applications may be made at any time, however, to be assured of con- 
sideration for September admission, they must be received by May 1 . 
Applications from those applying for financial aid and assistantships 
for September need to be completed by February 1. Later applica- 
tions will be considered for financial aid if funding is available. 
M.S. Degree Requirements 

No fixed curriculum is prescribed for the M.S. degree. Instead, 
a course and research program that is consistent with the student's 
background and professional objectives are developed by the student 
and his or her faculty advisory committee. The graduate program 
assumes a basic undergraduate foundation in the geosciences. 
Students lacking such a background may be required to complete 
certain subjects at the undergraduate level before or during their 
graduate program. Master's candidates in either Geology or 
Geophysics must complete or have completed two-semester (or 
equivalent) courses in calculus, physics, and chemistry. 

A minimum of 10 courses (numbered 300 or above), approved 
by the student's faculty advisory committee, must be completed in 
addition to a research thesis for graduation. Graduate level multidis- 
ciplinary Earth Systems Seminars are offered annually by the depart- 
ment on different topics. Beginning graduate students are required 
to take the Earth Systems Seminar. A maximum of two thesis cours- 
es (GE 801) are allowed for M.S. thesis credit. Normally, no more 
than one Reading and Research course (GE 798 or GE 799) may be 
applied toward the minimum course requirement. All students are 
required to maintain at least a 3.0 average in departmental courses, 
as well as in all undergraduate courses (0-299) in the other sciences 
and mathematics. Passing a comprehensive oral examination is 
required of each student. Three copies of the thesis are required 
upon completion of the research: two unbound copies are presented 
to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences and one bound copy to 
the department. 
Dual Degree Program (M.S.-M.B.A.) 

In conjunction with the Carroll Graduate School of 
Management at Boston College, the Department of Geology and 
Geophysics offers interested students the opportunity to participate 
in the combined M.S.-M.B.A. degree program. Completion of this 
program leads to the awarding of both degrees. This program is 
excellent preparation for careers in industrial or financial geoscience 



management, including areas such as the environmental and petro- 
leum industries, natural hazard assessment and natural resource eval- 
uation and investment. 

The combined M.S.-M.B.A. program normally takes three 
years for students with a good science background as an undergrad- 
uate — about one year less than pursuing these two degrees indepen- 
dently. Students in this program commonly take their first year 
entirely within the Department of Geology and Geophysics. During 
the first summer, the student is expected to begin work on a research 
M.S. thesis that may be combined with an off-campus internship. 
The second year of the program is taken at the Carroll Graduate 
School of Management and the third year is split between both pro- 
grams. Corporate internships are encouraged. 

In applying to the program, students have two options. The 
first and most desirable option is for the student to apply directly to, 
and be accepted by, both the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences 
and the Carroll Graduate School of Management at the time of their 
initial application to Boston College. The GRE is required and 
GMAT tests may be requested. Students may contact the 
Department of Geology and Geophysics for information and appli- 
cation materials to both programs (please indicate you are interested 
in the Dual Degree Program). The deadline for admission to the 
Department of Geology and Geophysics is February 1 , the same as 
the deadline for M.S. candidates. The deadline for application to the 
Carroll Graduate School of Management is April 1 . 

The second option is for students to apply and be accepted to the 
M.S. program in Geology and Geophysics. During the spring of their 
first year, after consultation with their academic advisor, the student may 
then choose to apply to the Carroll Graduate School of Management for 
admission into the dual degree M.S.-M.B.A. program. 

Further information on this program and application materials 
may be obtained from Professor John E. Ebel, Director of Graduate 
Studies, Department of Geology and Geophysics, Devlin Hall 213, 
Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, 617-552-3640, 
ebel@bc.edu or from Graduate Admissions, Carroll Graduate 
School of Management, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, 
617-552-3920. 
Master of Science in Teaching 

The Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T) program is admin- 
istered through the Lynch Graduate School of Education in cooper- 
ation with the Department of Geology and Geophysics. It requires 
admission to both the Lynch Graduate School of Education and the 
Department of Geology and Geophysics. This program, which is 
designed for prospective teachers, acknowledges variations in prior 
background and skills. For those candidates without prior teaching 
experience, a 36-credit minimum M.S.T. degree program is 
required, in which at least five courses are in earth sciences, five 
courses in education, and six credits are for supervised internship 
teaching. For experienced teachers, a 30-credit minimum M.S.T. 
degree program is required (since the internship is not necessary) of 
which at least five courses are in the earth sciences. The application 
procedures for the M.S.T. degree programs are the same as those for 
the M.S. degree program. Students seeking certification in 
Massachusetts are required to pass the Massachusetts Educators 
Certification Test. For further information on the M.S.T, please 
refer to the Lynch School of Education section entitled, "Master's 
Programs in Secondary Teaching," or call the Office of Graduate 
Admissions, Lynch School of Education, at (617) 552-4214. 
M.S.T. Degree Requirements 

The five required courses in the earth sciences must be chosen from 
among the following: two courses from Exploring the Earth I and II or 
Structural Geology I, and one course from each of the following groups: 



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(1) Earth Materials, Mineralogy, or Petrology; (2) Weather, Climate, 
Environment, Oceanography, or Astronomy; and (3) Petrology, 
Structural Geology I or II, Environmental Geology, Environmental 
Chemistry, or Introdurtion to Geophysics. Students who have previous- 
ly taken these courses may substitute other graduate courses within the 
Geology and Geophysics Department with approval. One semester of 
full-time residency may be necessary. A comprehensive examination is 
given to each student at the end of the program. This examination is in 
two parts: one part is oral in the earth sciences, and the other part is given 
by the Lynch School of Education Graduate Programs. 
Cooperative Program 

The Department is part of a cooperative program with the 
Department of Geology at nearby Boston University, as well as in 
the Civil Engineering Department at Tufts University. This program 
permits degree candidates at Boston College to enroll in courses that 
are unavailable at Boston College but are available at Boston 
University or Tufts. A list of courses is available in the Department. 
Weston Observatory 

Weston Observatory, formerly Weston College Seismic Station 
(1928-1949), is part of the Department of Geology and Geophysics 
of Boston College. Located 10 miles from the main campus, the 
Observatory is an interdisciplinary research facility of the depart- 
ment, and a center for research in the fields of geophysics, geology, 
and related fields. Weston Observatory was one of the first partici- 
pating facilities in the Worldwide Standardized Seismograph 
Network and operates a twelve-station regional seismic network that 
records data on earthquakes in the northeast, as well as distant earth- 
quakes. The facilities at Weston Observatory offer students a unique 
opportunity to work on exciting projects with modern, sophisticat- 
ed, scientific research equipment in a number of different areas of 
scientific and environmental interest. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
For additional information regarding courses which are 
offered periodically, please check the Geology and Geophysics web 
site at http://vvww.bc.edu/geology. 
GE 115 Planet Earth I (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: GE 116 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

This course is an introduction to basic principles and process- 
es controlling the development and environments of our only home. 
Planet Earth. Topics include scientific methods of investigation, ori- 
gins of rocks and minerals, methods of deciphering geologic history, 
plate tectonics and its role in development of earthquakes, volcan- 
ism, and mountain belts. (Lectures include explanation and impli- 
cations of the Richter Magnitude Scale) . One two-hour laborato- 
ry/A-T discussion session and two 50-minute lectures per week. 
E. G. Bombolakis 

GE 125 Planet Earth II (Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: GE 126 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

The story of Earth's 4600-million year evolution ranges from 
the ocean's abyss to the highest mountain crest. Explore the growth 
of continents and ocean basins through time, plate tectonic move- 
ments expressed in earthquakes, volcanoes and formation of moun- 
tains, the assembly and break-up of supercontinents and their effect 
on climate and life, formation and melting of continental glaciers, 
and impacts on life including humans. Two hours of lecture and one 
two-hour A-T laboratory per week. 
The Department 



GE 132 Exploring the Earth I: Origin and Systems (Fall: 3) 

Corequisite: GE 133 

Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

Unravel Earth's mysteries as you learn about its geological 
processes, including climate change, minerals, rocks and the processes 
that form them, plate tectonics, volcanoes, methods for determining 
geological history and origins of Earth. Field trips to caves, Boston 
Harbor, and upstate New York will help you interpret and explain 
geology and show how geological discoveries influence public policy. 
Jump start your major/minor in geology, geophysics or environmental 
geoscience with this class, and/or fulfill a Core requirement. 
/. Christopher Hepburn 
Kevin G. Harrison 

GE 134 Exploring the Earth II: Structure and Internal Processes 
(Spring: 4) 
Corequisite: GE 135 

Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 
May be taken without GE 132 

In this course, we will explore the structure and internal 
processes of Planet Earth. The course is designed for majors and 
minors in the Department of Geology and Geophysics, as well as for 
other science majors or for anyone interested in a thorough coverage 
of topics in the geological sciences. Topics include the following: 
seismology and the earth's interior, the earth's magnetic field, the 
earth's gravitational field, earthquakes, and plate tectonics. A labora- 
tory (GE 135) gives students hands-on experience. 
Alan Kafka 
David C Roy 

GE 143 Geologic Hazards of Volcanoes, Landslides, and 
Earthquakes (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

A review is given during the first several weeks of basic princi- 
ples, origins of common earth materials, and of plate tectonics in 
preparation for analyses of geologic hazards. The analyses will 
include disasters such as the loss of almost the entire population of 
Martinique by volcanism in 1902, major landslides in California 
and Alaska, recent major earthquakes, as well as the prediction of 
earthquakes in California and the eastern United States. Two 75 
minute lectures per week. 
E.G. Bombolakis 

GE 146 Origin and Evolution of Life on Earth (Fall: 4) 
Corequisite: GE 147 

Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

The course makes extensive use of the Internet as a learning 
resource. 

This course explores current theories about the origins of life, 
beginning with the original hypothesis of the Russian biochemist, 
A.l. Oparin. Darwin's theory of evolution is emphasized, but many 
different components of the Natural Sciences touch upon this topic. 
The course lectures include the study of the oldest fossils, life in 
extreme habitats, cellular biology, prebiotic molecules and the search 
for life on other planets. The lab/discussion section (GE 147) empha- 
sizes both basic paleontology and environmental evolution including 
the study of fossils as a record of how life has evolved on Earth. 
Paul K. Strother 

GE 150 Astronomy (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

Astronomy observations and theories date back to before the 
beginning of recorded history. The development of Astronomy is 
closely tied to the growth of physics, mathematics, philosophy and 
theology. This survey course covers many of the exciting recent 



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advances in Astronomy. Emphasis is on large-scale concepts and on 

how we know what we know about our universe, stars, and to some 

small extent, planets and other bodies. 

The Department 

GE 152 Earth Resources and Environment (Fall: 3) 

In this course we will explore the impact of humans on the envi- 
ronment in the past and present with projections for the fiature. The 
analysis will be based on models for how the earth's atmosphere and 
hydrosphere work as complex and coupled systems. The effects of ener- 
gy and food production, industrial processes and increasing population 
on these earth systems will be considered from local to global scales. In 
assessing future environmental risks, we will consider uncertainties in 
the predictions of scientific models as well as technological, economic 
and political factors that may mitigate or exacerbate these risks. 
GE 157 Oceanography (Fall: 4) 
Corequisite: GE 158 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

This course is an investigation of the world's ocean as an inte- 
grated system driven by geological, chemical, physical and biological 
processes. Topics include: origin and evolution of the ocean basins, 
nature of the sea bottom, characteristics of ocean water, and causes and 
effects of ocean currents and circulation. An understanding of the 
ocean's role in the health and evolution of the planet is stressed with 
special emphasis on coastal areas and the animal and plant life in the 
sea. Three hours of lecture and one two-hour laboratory each week. 
Gail C. Kineke 

GE 167 Environmental Geosciences I: Resources and Pollution 
(FaU/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

Technology and population growth are causing us to alter our 
planet at rates much faster than the geologic time it commonly needs 
to recover from our use and abuse. We will explore areas in which 
the human species is affecting the Earth's long-term physical-chem- 
ical system by consuming and polluting its vital resources. The focus 
will be on geological issues critical to planning for a sustainable 
future. Topics, geared for the non-science major, include: popula- 
tion, future water supplies, urban/industrial pollution, acid rain, 
ozone depletion, and meeting our energy needs. Three 50-minute 
multimedial-enhanced lectures per/week. 
Judith Hepburn 

GE 168 Environmental Geosciences II: Earth Processes and Risk 
(Spring: 3) 

Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 
This course may be taken independently of GE 167. 

This course emphasizes the ways in which humans interact 
with natural processes operating on and within the Earth that create 
hazards for us. Subject matter will include volcanoes and earth- 
quakes and the geologic processes that create them, river and coastal 
processes and their flooding landslides, long and short-term climate 
changes and events that might cause the extinction of life itself. 
Emphasis will also be on risk assessment and mitigation on human 
alterations to natural systems that increase the likelihood and cost of 
natural hazard events. Three 50-minute multimedia-enhanced lec- 
tures per week. 
Judith Hepburn 

GE 172 Weather, Climate and the Environment (Fall: 4) 

Corequisite: GE 173 

Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

The earth's atmosphere is a dynamic system, causing weather 
changes daily, seasonal variations on an annual basis, and climate 
changes on time scales from centuries to millennia and even longer. 



This course examines the earth's weather system at all these time 
scales. The latest methods in local weather forecasting are explored 
from the point of view of computer models and internet websites. 
The effects of ocean temperatures. El Nifio, the extent of the earth's 
ice caps, and volcanic eruptions on the long-term weather patterns 
are described, and man-made environmental effects such as the 
greenhouse effect and ozone holes are explored. 
John E. Ebel 

GE 175 Global Warming (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

This course explores the theory of global warming in its entire- 
ty, for students at all levels. What are the mechanisms driving cli- 
mate change? How big are the expected changes? Do we really need 
to change our habits? Topics will include: factors that govern climate 
change, climates of the past, modeling the climate, impacts of cli- 
mate change, relevance, weighing the uncertainty, and actions to 
slow and stabilize climate change. Students will ultimately integrate 
what they have learned with how they choose to think and act. This 
course combines fields as diverse as chemistry, geology, environmen- 
tal science, ecology and physics. 
Kevin G. Harrison 
GE 177 Cosmos (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

We are in the process of exploring the Solar System and beyond. 
The results of recent manned and unmanned space programs, includ- 
ing Apollo (moon). Viking and Pathfinder (Mars), Pioneer and 
Voyager (Mercury, Venus, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune), 
Magellan (Venus) and Galileo (Jupiter) will be reviewed to help 
develop models for the geologic evolution of these bodies and a cur- 
rent picture for the origin of the solar system. The question of life on 
other planets, particularly Mars, will be discussed. Throughout the 
course, the fundamentals of how science works will be emphasized. 
/. Christopher Hepburn 

GE 187 Geoscience and Public Policy (Fall: 3) 

Corequisite: GE 188 

Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

In this course, we will explore case studies that demonstrate the 
role of the earth sciences in addressing problems of public policy. For 
each case study, students will be introduced to the underlying scien- 
tific concepts relevant to the problem being addressed. After this sci- 
entific foundation is developed, we will discuss how it needs to be 
considered as part of the process of making policy decisions. The 
course will also introduce students to how scientists and public pol- 
icy makers apply the concepts of probability and statistics in the 
decision making process. 
Alan Kafka 

GE 192 Earth Under Siege (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: High school chemistry 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

The course offers an introduction to the understanding of the 
atmosphere that surrounds us and the human activities that are 
affecting it. The fundamental concepts of the nature and scope of 
atmospheric environmental problems are introduced, including the 
behavior of common gases, simple chemical processes in the envi- 
ronment, and the properties of light and heat. Key pollution issues 
are addressed in terms of their local, regional, and global implica- 
tions. Physical and chemical principles are placed in the perspective 
of real world events, and everyday experiences are used to illustrate 
some of these principles. 
Rudolph Hon 



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GE 197 The Dynamic Earth (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Natural Sciences Core Requirement 

This course explores the geological dynamics of the Earth and 
its surface and subsurface processes. These processes produce short- 
term changes such as landslides and fault displacements and long- 
term processes that move the tectonic plates. Over billions of years 
these processes have made Earth as we know it. They have produced 
the natural resources that we now exploit but they have also pre- 
sented us with hazards. Understanding the processes of Earth is 
important to our long-term inhabitation of the planet. 
David C. Roy 

GE 220 Earth Materials (Spring: 4) 
Prerequisite: GE 132, or equivalent 
Corequisite: GE 221 

Designed to acquaint majors and minors in the Department or 
in the Environmental Sciences minor with the basic materials present 
in the Earth and on the Earth's surface. The common rock-forming 
silicate minerals are discussed first. Then igneous, metamorphic, and 
sedimentary processes are investigated to develop the classifications of 
these groups of rocks. Lastly, the weathering of rocks at the Earth's 
surface and the formation and classification of soils will be discussed. 
Laboratory (GE 221), where students get hands-on experience classi- 
fying the various rocks and minerals, is required. 
/. Christopher Hepburn 

GE 250 Environmental Geology: Environmental 
Characterization and Assessment — Regulatory and Statutory 
Approach (Spring: 4) 
Prerequisites: GE 132-133, or equivalent 
Corequisite: GE 251 

Focus is on learning and experiencing practical field and labora- 
tory exercises that parallel the complete sequence of federal and state 
mandated investigations needed for the complete environmental char- 
acterization of a site. Topics that will be covered include: subsurface 
investigations by direct and indirect methods, laboratory characteriza- 
tion of geological material, characterization and composition of 
groundwater, EPA analytical methods for groundwater testing for the 
presence of contaminants and pollution, methods of remediation and 
other related topics. Laboratory exercises (GE 251) will follow an estab- 
lished protocol of field investigation, drilling, surveying, material char- 
acterization, computer applications and technical report preparation. 
Rudolph Hon 

GE 264 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation (Spring: 4) 
Prerequisites: GE 132-133 
Corequisite: GE 265 

This course deals with the systematics of stratified sedimentary 
rocks and the processes that form individual layers. Lectures will 
cover the processes that produce sediment (weathering, erosion); 
transportation of particulate sediment in streams, rivers, and bodies 
of standing water; and the formation of carbonate limestones. Using 
fossils, radiometric techniques, and paleomagnetism, time correla- 
tions can be made over very large distances; even on a global scale. 
David C Roy 

GE 297 Environmental Hydrology (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: GE 132-133 or equivalent 

An introduction to hydrological processes on and near the 
Earth's surface. Groundwater hydrology, the movement of water 
through the upper portion of the Earth, will be emphasized. 
Practical applications and problems in ground water hydrology and 
the environment will be stressed. 
Dale Weiss 



GE 596 Reading and Research in Environmental Geology 

(Fall/Spring: 3) 

Permission of a faculty member is required in advance of enrollment. 

For undergraduates wishing to pursue independent study in the 
area of environmental geology under the direction of a faculty member. 
Study can be in an area of knowledgeable interest or on a particular 
problem. The possibility exists to work with actual problems in 
Massachusetts using data from state agencies. This course is also 
intended for undergraduate students working on Departmental theses. 
The Department 

GE 597 Reading and Research in Geology (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Permission of a iaculty member is required in advance of enrollment. 

For undergraduates wishing to pursue independent study in the 
area of geology under the direction of a faculty member Study can 
be in an area of knowledgeable interest or on a particular problem. 
This course is also intended for undergraduate students working on 
Departmental theses. 
The Department 

GE 598 Reading and Research in Geophysics (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Permission of a faculty member is required in advance of enrollment. 

For undergraduates wishing to pursue independent study in the 
area of geophysics under the direction of a faculty member. Study 
can be in an area of knowledgeable interest or on a particular prob- 
lem. This course is also intended for undergraduate students work- 
ing on Departmental theses. 
The Department 

GE 599 Advanced Independent Research (Fall/Spring: 6) 
Formerly known as Scholar of the College 

Independent Study in Geology, Geophysics, or the 
Environmental Geosciences under the direction of a faculty member 
for undergraduate students qualifying for the University's Advanced 
Independent Research Program. 
The Department 

Undergraduate and Graduate Course Offerings 
GE 330 Paleontology (Fall: 4) 

Prerequisites: 1 year of introductory geology, or 1 year of introducto- 
ry biology, or permission of the instructor 
Corequisite: GE 331 

Methods in paleontology will be considered. We will look at 
some practical applications of paleontology in science and industry. 
The history and evolution of life on Earth will be the primary 
theme. This course will concentrate on fossil animals, but will also 
consider plants and environmental analyses. The study of inverte- 
brates will occupy a large portion of the course. A significant amount 
of time will be spent discussing the evolution of dinosaurs, birds, 
and other vertebrates. The goal of this course is to give students a 
better understanding of modern environmental systems through the 
study of the fossil record. 
David Krauss 

GE 372 and 374 Petrology I and II (Fall/Spring: 4) 
Prerequisites: First year chemistry, GE 132, GE 220, or equivalent 
Corequisite: GE 373 
Prerequisites: GE 372, or equivalent 
Corequisite: GE 375 
Offered Biennially 

This course has two parts, silicate mineralogy/optical mineral- 
ogy and igneous petrology. During the first part of the course, the 
mineralogy of the silicates is reviewed and then applied, along with 
studies of the physics of the interaction of light with crystalline mat- 
ter. The second part of the course covers the basic principles of 
igneous petrology, equilibrium and non-equilibrium crystallization 



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and the use of phase diagrams to understand igneous rock forma- 
tion. In the laboratory (GE 373), students will learn to use the polar- 
izing microscope to identify mineral separates in oils and minerals 
and rocks in thin section. 
/ Christopher Hepburn 
Rudolph Hon 
David C. Roy 

GE 380 Environmental Oceanography (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: GE 132 

In this course, fundamental physical, chemical, geological, and 
biological processes occurring in ocean environments are examined 
in the context of how they impact humans, and how humans have 
impacted the ocean. Emphasis is placed on understanding the chal- 
lenges involved with the development of environments and 
resources through actual case studies and problem solving. Topics 
include coastal oceanography and shore processes, water chemistry, 
biogeochemical cycles and circulation, and air/sea interactions as 
related to pollution and climate change. 
Gail C. Kineke 

GE 385 Structural Geology II, Analytical Aspects (Fall: 4) 
Prerequisites: GE 132 and 134, or equivalent; one year of college cal- 
culus; PH 211 or equivalent 
Corequisite: GE 386 

A history of the development of structural geology will be pre- 
sented during the first several lectures. Then an in-depth analysis will 
be given of basic principles (such as Newtonian mechanics, stress, 
and strain) required for quantitative analyses of fracture, faulting, 
folding, and igneous intrusions. Examples of their application will 
include the Southern Appalachians, the Southern Canadian foreland 
fold-and-thrust belt, the Wyoming fold-and-thrust belt, the Alps, 
and the Caucasus fold-and-thrust belt. One two-hour problem ses- 
sion-laboratory each week (GE 386). 
E.G. Bombolakis 

GE 391 Introduction to Geophysics (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 134; MT 102-103; PH 211-212, or permission of 
instructor 

This course provides an introduction to the fundamental princi- 
ples of geophysics. Both theoretical and applied aspects of geophysics 
will be discussed. Topics include stress and strain, deformation of earth 
materials, the earth's gravitational field, the earth's magnetic field, seis- 
mic waves, earth structure, earthquakes, and tectonic processes. 
Alan Kafka 

GE 392 Environmental Geochemistry: Living Dangerously (Fall: 4) 
Prerequisite: 1 year of calculus or chemistry; or ability to do word 
problems that involve unit conversions 
Corequisite: GE 393 

This course will introduce upper level undergraduate science 
majors and graduate students to environmental geochemistry. 
Studying atmospheric, terrestrial, freshwater, and marine geochem- 
istry will provide a context for understanding environmental prob- 
lems. Topics include aqueous geochemistry, environmental chemi- 
cal analysis, nature and sources of hazardous wastes (environmental 
chemistry, reduction, treatment and disposal), acid rain, ozone hole, 
nuclear winter, and alcohol production. We will also look at the sci- 
ence behind A Civil Action and Erin Brockovich. Interested students 
from disciplines beyond geology are welcome. Geology and envi- 
ronmental geoscience majors will find this course good preparation 
for today's job market. 
Kevin G Harrison 



GE 398 Statistical Analysis of Scientific Data (Fall: 3) 
Offered Biennially 

The scientific process involves the collection of data for the 
testing and development of scientific models. This course covers the 
statistical methods commonly used to acquire, analyze and interpret 
many different types of scientific data. 
Alan Kafka 

GE 405 Climate Change (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: One year of chemistry and/or calculus. Students should 
feel comfortable doing word problems that involve unit conversions. 
Offered Biennially 

This course will explore the indicators and mechanisms of natu- 
rally-occurring climate change. Mechanisms include the Milankovich 
cycles, changes in ocean circulation, and changes in the water content 
of the atmosphere. Indicators include oxygen and carbon isotopes, 
gases trapped in ice cores, and the concentration of metals bound in 
carbonate shells of plankton and coral. Interested students from any 
discipline are welcome. 
Kevin G Harrison 

GE 410 Site Characterization, Remediation, and Long Term 
Monitoring for Hazardous Waste Sites (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: GE 132, or equivalent, or permission of instructor 

A survey of techniques available for environmental assessment 
of contaminated sites will be presented. The characterization of con- 
taminated sites will be defined and quantified. The remediation 
techniques used for cleaning-up contaminated soils and bedrock will 
be discussed. Technologies currently used for remediation will be 
evaluated. In many cases, valid techniques for clean-up exist but are 
cost prohibitive. Long term monitoring of remediated sites and cri- 
teria for assessing the completeness of remediation will be presented. 
Randolph Martin III 
GE 418 Hydrogeology (Spring: 4) 
Corequisite: GE 419 

This is an introductory course in groundwater hydrogeology 
for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students. The 
course covers the following topics: the hydrologic cycle, porosity, 
permeability and hydraulic conductivity of geologic materials, prin- 
ciples of groundwater flow, well hydraulics and aquifer testing, geo- 
logic control on groundwater flow, an introduction to contaminant 
hydrogeology and field methods of site characterization. GE 419 is 
the laboratory/discussion group component of this course. 
Alfredo Urzua 

GE 424 Environmental Geophysics (Fall: 4) 
Prerequisites: MT 102-103; PH 209-210; or PH 211-212; or per- 
mission of instructor 
Corequisite: GE 425 

This is an applied course in geophysical exploration. The 
emphasis is on the methods that are used in environmental site 
assessments and geotechnical engineering work. The principles and 
methods studied are also applicable to petroleum and mineral explo- 
ration. The methods covered include: resistivity, induced polariza- 
tion, electromagnetics, magnetics, gravity, self potentials and ground 
penetrating radar. In this course students will participate in an on- 
going geophysical investigation (GE 425) of the Weston 
Observatory Environmental Field Station. Investigations may also 
be conducted at other relevant sites. Lectures will be given on field 
methodology, instrumentation, theory, and interpretation. 
David P. Lesmes 



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GE 470 Engineering Geology (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 132-134 or equivalent, PH 209-210 and CH 109-1 10 
Offered Biennially 

This course studies several typical methods of analysis and 
treatment performed by engineering/environmental companies for 
behavioral problems commonly encountered in sands, silts, clays 
and rocks. 
E.G. Bombolakis 

GE 480 Applications of GIS (Geographical Information Systems) 
(Spring: 4) 
Corequisite: GE 481 

The course covers fundamental concepts and practical applica- 
tions of GIS in the geosciences, environmental sciences, land use, 
and other related fields. Students will learn the basics and principles 
of spatial database management, database query, and preparation of 
printed maps. Formal presentations and practical laboratory assign- 
ments (GE581) will use ArcView and ArcGlS software packages 
with spatial data sets taken from across the disciplines including geo- 
sciences, environmental studies and land use/city planning, market- 
ing and other fields. Students will gain working experience of apply- 
ing GIS to their studies and research, as well as achieve practical 
skills for the marketplace. 
Rudolph Hon 

GE 518 Estuarine Studies (Spring: 4) 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Three (3) hours per week plus extended field experiment. 

This course, geared toward junior-level science majors, is an 
exploration of the geological, chemical, physical, and biological 
processes occurring in estuaries. Class meetings are used for discus- 
sions of readings from scientific literature, definition of research 
problems as a team, and introduction to data analysis and interpre- 
tation using results from prior field experiments and the numerical 
processing package MATLAB. The field component is a one-to-two 
week field excursion using a coastal research vessel and is an intro- 
duction to marine science field methods, collection of data for indi- 
vidual projects, interpretation and presentation of results. 
Gail C. Kineke 

GE 520 Sedimentary Petrology (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: GE 132, 134, 264, 272 
Offered Periodically 

The petrography and origin of major sedimentary rock types 
will be emphasized. 
David C. Roy 

GE 530 Marine Geology (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 132, GE 134, 1 year college calculus and physics 
Offered Biennially 

Recent geological and geophysical information on the ocean basins 
is examined concentrating on three areas: (1) structure of the earth, plate 
tectonics, and composition of the ocean basins; (2) geophysical process- 
es responsible for the structure and evolution of the ocean basins; and 
(3) marine sedimentation including sediment transport, pleistocene sed- 
imentation and global climate change. Sedimentological and geophysi- 
cal investigation techniques are emphasized. 
Gail C. Kineke 

GE 535 Coastal Processes (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: One year of college calculus and physics 
College calculus and physics recommended. 
Offered Biennially 

This course is a study of the physical and geological processes 
responsible for the formation and evolution of coastal environments. 



This course takes a morphodynamic approach by studying the cou- 
pled suite of hydrodynamic processes, seafloor morphologies and 
sequences of change. 
Gail C. Kineke 

GE 547 Advanced Structural Geology (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 
Offered Periodically 

Course covers the deformation of the lithosphere and a com- 
parison of the North American Cordillera with the Appalachians. 
This comparison of epeirogenesis and orogenesis involves the prin- 
ciples of the deformation of materials and the analyses of stress and 
strain in order to analyze stress-strain and stress-strain-time behavior 
of the lithosphere. 
E.G. Bombolakis 

GE 580 Environmental Seminar (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Undergraduates need permission from the Director of 
Environmental Studies, or the instructor 
Corequisite: GE 581 

This interdisciplinary seminar is for students in the 
Environmental Studies Program or Environmental Geoscience 
Majors (with the permission of the instructor). During the semester, 
we will evaluate the impact of environmental contamination on the 
residents of Boston and its surrounding communities, as well as 
other communities within Massachusetts, New England, and 
throughout the world. The topics covered in the seminar will be 
motivated by specific case histories. Readings will pertain to the sci- 
entific, social, and political aspects of these environmental problems. 
Several field trips and guest lectures by environmental specialists will 
be arranged throughout the semester. 
David P. Lesmes 

Graduate Course Offerings 
GE 612 Rock Physics (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 
Corequisite: GE 613 

An introduction to the physical and chemical properties of 
rocks and soils. The focus of the course is on how the microscopic 
properties of rock-soil systems affect macroscopic geologic processes 
and geophysical observations. The course is aimed at advanced geol- 
ogy and geophysics students with interests in the following areas: 
environmental and geotechnical fields, petroleum and mineral 
exploration, and remote sensing. The lectures and a weekly labora- 
tory (GE 613) will cover both theoretical and experimental aspects 
of the subject. 
David P. Lesmes 

GE 655 Exploration Seismology (Spring: 4) 
Corequisite: GE 656 

This course is an introduction to the basics of exploration seis- 
mology. Emphasis is placed on environmental and geotechnical appli- 
cations as well as techniques used in petroleum and mineral explo- 
ration. The lectures cover the ideas and theories used in the acquisition, 
processing and presentation of seismic refraction and reflection data. 
Discussion/laboratory (GE 656) is a corequisite for this course which is 
an introduction to seismic field and interpretation techniques. 
John E. Ehel 

GE 690 Tectonics of the Appalachian Orogen and Related 
Terrains (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: GE 285, 290, 526, 528 
Offered Periodically 

The most significant literature on the nearly one billion year 
evolution of the component terrains that now comprise this Circum- 
Atlantic mountain system will be reviewed and analyzed. 



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Stratigraphic, structural, petrologic, and related geophysical, geo- 
chemical, and paleontological parameters important for holistic tec- 
tonic reconstructions will be emphasized. 
The Department 

GE 692 Earth Systems Seminar I (Fall: 3) 

Upper level undergraduates may enroll by permission of the 
instructors. 
Offered Periodically 

This is a graduate level multidisciplinary course offered annu- 
ally by the Department on different topics. Beginning graduate stu- 
dents are required to take the Earth Systems Seminar. 
The Department 

GE 794 Seminar in Geology (Fall: 3) 
Offered Periodically 

This course is an analysis and discussion of topics of current 
interest in geology. 
The Department 

GE 795 Seminar in Geophysics (Fall: 3) 
Offered Periodically 

This course is an analysis and discussion of topics of current 
interest in geophysics. 
The Department 

GE 796 Seminar in Geology (Spring: 3) 
Offered Periodically 

This course is an analysis and discussion of topics of current 
interest in geology. 
The Department 

GE 797 Seminar in Geophysics (Spring: 3) 
Offered Periodically 

This course is an analysis and discussion of topics of current 
interest in geophysics. 
The Department 

GE 798 Reading and Research in Geophysics (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Permission of a faculty member is required in advance of enrollment. 

A research study of a topic in geophysics under the supervision 
of a faculty member. 
The Department 

GE 799 Reading and Research in Geology (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Permission of a faculty member is required in advance of enrollment. 

A research study of a topic in geology under the supervision of 
a faculty member. 
The Department 
GE 801 Thesis Seminar (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Thesis research under the guidance of a faculty member. 
The Department 
GE 888 Interim Study (Fall/Spring: 0) 

Required for master's candidates who have completed all their 
course requirements but have not taken comprehensive examina- 
tions. Also for master's students who have taken up to six credits of 
Thesis Seminar but have not yet finished writing their thesis. 
The Department 

German Studies 

Faculty 

Christoph W. Eykman, Professor; Ph.D., Rhein, Friedr. Wilhelm 

Universitat, Bonn 

Michael Resler, Professor; Chairperson of the Department; A.B., 

The College of William and Mary; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

University 



Rachel Freudenburg, Associate Professor; B.A., M.A., Wayne State 
University; Ph.D., Harvard University 
Departmental Notes 

• Department Secretary: Agnes Parkas, 617-552-3740, 
farkasag@bc.edu. 

• World Wide Web: http://www.bc.edu/germanic 

Undergraduate Program Description 

The German major aims to prepare students not only for fur- 
ther study but also for a professional life which is enhanced through 
a knowledge of German language, history, and culture. 
Major Requirements 

The major in German Studies is designed to give the student an 
active command of the German language, an insight into German lit- 
erature and culture, and provide the background for graduate study 
in the field. Students majoring in German Studies are required to 
complete a total of 1 courses within the following curriculum: 

• (2) (GM 201-202) Composition and Conversation 

• (2) (GM 210-211) History of German Literature 

• (6) Six semester courses in German literature or culture 
Note for majors with transfer credits: 

Of the 10 semester courses, a minimum of four courses beyond 
Composition and Conversation (i.e., at least four upper-level litera- 
ture or culture courses) must be taken within the German Studies 
Department at Boston College. 
Information for First Year Majors 

A prospective German major should select an initial language 
course, e.g., GM 001, GM 050, or GM 201, according to his/her high 
school language preparation. The student can supplement this choice 
with an elective. He or she can select a course on German literature, 
culture, philosophy, history, art history, music, or a German course 
offered in English translation. In all, 10 one-semester courses in 
German numbered 100 and above are required to complete the major. 
Information for Study Abroad 

Prior to study abroad, German majors must complete the fol- 
lowing prerequisites: minimum language preparation of 2 semesters 
of Intermediate German (GM 050-051) or the equivalent. Since 
studying German is fully consistent with majoring (or minoring) in 
German, nearly all courses taken abroad will be accorded major (or 
minor) credit. However, as noted in all departmental publications, 
of the 10 semester courses which constitute the major, a minimum 
of 4 courses beyond Composition and Conversation (i.e., at least 4 
upper-level literature or culture courses) must be taken within the 
German Studies Department at Boston College. 

The department prefers for students to study abroad during 
their junior year (either full year or semester) rather than senior year. 
Programs in Eichstatt, Dresden, Heidelberg, Tubingen, Freiburg, 
and Munich are all recommended. Students should consult either 
Prof Rachel Freudenburg or Prof Michael Resler when planning to 
study abroad in Germany. 

Graduate Program Description 

Although the Department of German Studies does not offer a 
graduate degree, the following course is available to graduate stu- 
dents from various departments. 

GM 061 Intensive Reading in German (Summer: 1) 

No previous knowledge of German required 

This course is intended to prepare the student for either a grad- 
uate language reading examination or the standardized Princeton 
type of test, and provides him or her with the ability to read gener- 
al or specialized material in his or her own major field as well as in 
related areas. 



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Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at littp://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
GM 001 German A (Elementary I) (Fall: 3) 

Students are introduced to the basics of the German language: 
vocabulary, grammar, communicating in every-day situations, read- 
ing, listening comprehension, and writing. The course is supple- 
mented with an interactive CD-ROM in the first semester and 
videos in the second. Intended for those with no prior knowledge of 
German as well as those with some high school background. 
Graduate students must either take this course for credit or register 
as auditors. 
Rachel Freudenburg 
Ursula Mangoubi 

GM 002 German A (Elementary II) (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: GM 001 

A continuation of GM 001. Students are introduced to the 
basics of the German language: vocabulary, grammar, communicat- 
ing in every-day situations, reading, listening comprehension, and 
writing. The course is supplemented with an interactive CD-ROM 
in the first semester and videos in the second. Intended for those 
with no prior knowledge of German as well as those with some high 
school background. Graduate students must either take this course 
for credit or register as auditors. 
Rachel Freudenburg 
Ursula Mangoubi 

GM 050-051 Intermediate German I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: GM 001-002 or their equivalent 
Conducted primarily in German. 

Further training in active use of the language, with emphasis on 
reading and conversation. The course includes readings in twentieth- 
century German prose, fiction and non-fiction, German culture and 
society, grammar review, and discussion and composition. Auditors 
must register. 
Notburga Connolly 
Christoph Eykman 
Michael Resler 
The Department 

GM 063 Triumphs and Failings of Modern Man (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with EN 084 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 
Conducted in English with all texts in English translation. 
Counts toward German Major. 
Offered Biennially 

This course focuses on a number of themes which characterize 
human existence in our time but are at the same time perennial 
themes: death, life, illness, suffering, war, and the role of the scien- 
tist in the modern world. Twentieth century German, Swiss and 
Austrian writers will be discussed. The following works will be dis- 
cussed in class: Thomas Mann, The Magic Mountain{novel); 
Sigmund Freud, An Outline of Psychoanalysis (essay); Erich Maria 
Remarque, All Quiet on the Western Front (novel); Wolfgang 
Borchert, The Man Outside (play and stories); Heinrich Boll, Stories; 
Friedrich Durrenmatt, The Physicists (play) . 
Christoph Eykman 

GM 066 The Quest for Justice (Fall: 3) 
Conducted in English. 
Satisfies Literature Core Requirement 
All texts in English translation. 

The term poetic justice implies that when we are wronged, lit- 
erature can put it right, even if our environment cannot. In this 



course, we read two of Germany's most enigmatic authors: Heinrich 
von Kleist and Franz Kafka. Though hailing from two different cen- 
turies, both grapple with the task of defining a universal standard of 
justice in a diverse world. Is there really justice for all when racism 
and sexism inform not only our thinking but also our social institu- 
tions? Can we ever really know what justice is, after we realize that 
all human knowledge is subjective? 
Rachel Freudenburg 

GM 175 Business German (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: GM 051 or the equivalent 
Conducted in German. 

An introduction to the language and structure of business in 
the German-speaking countries, this course will focus on daily busi- 
ness practices, on texts related to business in German, and on cul- 
tural differences in the German-speaking business world. A semes- 
ter's work includes the practice of skills necessary to understand and 
perform basic business transactions (role-playing); the exploration of 
business in German in different media, such as television and the 
Internet; and the praxis-oriented expansion of applying the German 
language in a professional context. 
Ruth Sondermann 

GM 201 German Composition and Conversation I (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: GM 050-051 or their equivalent 
Required for German majors 
Auditors must register. 

This course is designed to improve fluency in spoken and writ- 
ten German. Review of grammar will be restricted to a few selected, 
difficult items. Short German compositions will be written periodi- 
cally. Course work includes systematic vocabulary building (includ- 
ing German idiomatic expressions as well as compound nouns and 
adjectives), listening comprehension, speaking exercises (sponta- 
neous and guided dialogues) and reading. 
The Department 

GM 202 German Composition and Conversation II (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: GM 201 or its equivalent 
Required for German majors. 
Auditors must register. 

This course is designed to improve fluency in spoken and writ- 
ten German. Review of grammar will be restricted to a few selected, 
difficult items. Short German compositions will be written periodi- 
cally. Course work includes systematic vocabulary building (includ- 
ing German idiomatic expressions as well as compound nouns and 
adjectives), listening comprehension, speaking exercises (sponta- 
neous and guided dialogues) and reading. Continuous practice and 
frequent intensive exposure to the foreign language will lead to 
progress in overall proficiency. 
Christoph Eykman 

GM 210 History of German Literature I (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: GM 050-051 (with a B- or better) or the equivalent 

Conducted in German. 

Required for German majors. 

Offered Biennially 

An introduction to the study of German literature, including 
a special unit on Faust. Selected texts from the Middle Ages to 1800 
will be analyzed against the background of historical events, 
European literary movements, philosophy, music, art and architec- 
ture. In addition, various language learning activities, such as a 
review of advanced grammar points, vocabulary building exercises, 
short writing assignments and oral reports help students improve 
their overall proficiency in German. 
Rachel Freudenburg 



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GM 211 History of German Literature II (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: GM 050-051 (with a B- or better) or the equivalent 
Conducted in German. 
Required for German majors. 
Offered Biennially 

An introduction to the study of German literature. Selected 
texts from 1800 to the 20th century will be analyzed against the 
background of historical events, European literary movements, phi- 
losophy, music, film, art and architecture. Includes field trips as well 
as special units on the Holocaust and "minority" authors. This 
course incorporates activities to boost students' German proficiency. 
Although German 210 is not a prerequisite, this course is a contin- 
uation of the History of German Literature I. 
Rachel Freudenburg 

GM 216 Shooting Nazis: German Film Irom 1933-1945 (Spring: 3) 
Conducted in English. 

This course examines how filmmakers have sought to under- 
stand German fascism and its horrific consequences. Beginning with 
the Nazis' self-representation in early propaganda films such as SA- 
Mann Brand, we continue with classics from the early postwar eras 
such as The Murders Among Us. With later films ( The Marriage of 
Maria Braun, David, The Boat, Jacob the Liar, The Harmonists, 
Mephisto, Life is Beautiful), we outline how evaluations of the 
Holocaust and the Third Reich have changed over time, and ask how 
American and German versions of this history differ. 
Rachel Freudenburg 

GM 222 Music and Word: German Musical Heritage from 1933 
to 1945 (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: GM050-051 or their equivalent 
Conducted in German. 
No formal knowledge of music required. 

Beginning in the Middle Ages and running through to the 
middle of the twentieth century, this course will examine the fusion 
of German-language texts with musical expression in the context of 
their social and cultural environment. A central focus of the course 
will be the great age of German music during the eighteenth and 
nineteenth centuries — including among others the works of Bach, 
Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven. 
Michael Resler 

GM 299 Reading and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
May be taken only with permission of the Chairperson 

The course includes supervised readings within specific areas, 
for the solution of individual problems of research. Students may 
sign up for this course only after the need for a special program has 
been established and a faculty member has agreed to supervise the 
project. By arrangement. 
Rachel Freudenburg 
Christoph Eykman 
Michael Resler 

GM 699 Honors Thesis (Fall/Spring: 3) 
May be taken only with permission of the Chairperson 

By arrangement. 
Christoph Eykman 
Rachel Freude, 
Michael Resler 



History 

Faculty 

Radu R. Florescu, Professor Emeritus; A.B., A.M., B.Litt., Oxford 

University; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Raymond T. McNally, Professor Emeritus; KX> ., Fordham 

University; Ph.D., Free University of Berlin 

Thomas H. O'Connor, Professor Emeritus; A.B., A.M., Boston 

College; Ph.D., Boston University 

Andrew Bunie, Professor; A.B., A.M., University of New 

Hampshire; Ph.D., University of Virginia 

James E. Cronin, Professor; B.A., Boston College; M.A., 

Northeastern University; Ph.D., Brandeis University 

Robin Fleming, Professor; B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of 

California at Santa Barbara 

Thomas Hachey, Professor; Ph.D., St. John's University 

John L. Heineman, Professor; A.B., University of Notre Dame; 

Ph.D., Cornell University 

Roberta Manning, Professor; B.A., Rice University; M.A., Ph.D., 

Columbia University 

David A. Northrup, Professor; B.S., M.A., Fordham University; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 

Alan Reinerman, Professor; B.S., A.M., Xavier University; Ph.D., 

Loyola University of Chicago 

Peter H. Weiler, Professor; Chairperson of the Department; A.B., 

Stanford University; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Lawrence Wolff, Professor; A.B., Harvard College; M.A., Ph.D., 

Stanford University 

Silas H. L. Wu, Professor; A.B., National Taiwan University; A.B., 

University of California at Berkeley; A.M., Yale University; Ph.D., 

Columbia University 

Benjamin Braude, Associate Professor; A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

University 

Paul Breines, Associate Professor; A.B., A.M., Ph.D., University of 

Wisconsin 

Ellen G. Friedman, Associate Professor; B.A., New York University; 

Ph.D., C.U.N.Y Grad School 

Mark I. Gelfand, Associate Professor; A.B., City College of New 

York; A.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., Columbia University 

Marilynn S. Johnson, Associate Professor; B.A., Stanford 

University; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 

Kevin Kenny, Associate Professor; M.A., University of Edinburgh, 

Scoriand; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 

R. Alan Lawson, Associate Professor; A.B., Brown University; A.M., 

University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Michigan 

William P. Leahy, S.J., Associate Professor and University President; 

B.A., M.A., St. Louis University; M. Div., S.T.M., Jesuit School of 

Theology; Ph.D., Stanford University 

Deborah Levenson-Estrada, Associate Professor; B.A., M.A., 

University of Massachusetts, Boston; Ph.D., New York University 

Cynthia Lylerly, Associate Professor; B.A., University of North 

Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Rice University 

Rev. Francis J. Murphy, Associate Professor; A.B., Holy Cross; 

A.M., Ph.D., CathoUc University 

Kevin O'Neill, Associate Professor; A.B., Marquette University; 

A.M., Loyola University of Chicago; Ph.D., Brown University 

James O'Toole, Associate Professor; A.B., Ph.D., Boston College; 

A.M., William and Mary College; M.S., Simmons College 

Prasannan Parthasarathi, Associate Professor; B.A., Williams 

College; M.A., Boston University; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Carol M. Petillo, Associate Professor; Director of Graduate Studies; 

A.B., Montclair State College; A.M., Ph.D., Rutgers University 



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Virginia Reinburg, Associate Professor; A.B., Georgetown 

University; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Alan Rogers, Associate Professor; A.B., M.A., Ph.D., University of 

California, Santa Barbara 

John H. Rosser, Associate Professor; A.B., University of Maryland; 

A.M., Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Paul G. Spagnoli, Associate Professor; A.B., Holy Cross; A.M., 

Ph.D., Harvard University 

Frank Fonda Taylor, Associate Professor; B.A., M.A., University of 

West Indies; Ph.D., University of Geneva 

Davarian ^a^Aviia, Assistant Professor; B.A., Marquette; M.A., 

Ph.D., New York University 

Crystal Veitaster, Assistant Professor; B.A., University of North 

Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Burke Gri^s, Assistant Professor; B.A., Stanford University; M.A., 

M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 

Seth}acohs, Assistant Professor; B.A., Yale University; M.D.A., 

DePaul University; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., 

Northwestern University 

David Ciya^ey, Assistant Professor; B.A., Amherst College; M.A., 

Ph.D., New York University 

Stephen Schloesser, S.J., Assistant Professor; A.B., University of St. 

Thomas; M.Div., Weston Jesuit School of Theology; A.M., Ph.D., 

Stanford University 

Franziska Seraphim, Assistant Professor; A.B., University of 

California at Berkeley; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 

Sergio Serulnikov, Assistant Professor; A.B., Universidad de Buenos 

Aires; M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York 

Silvana Palermo, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., University of 

Buenos Aires; M.A., Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony 

Brook 

Departmental Notes 

• Administrative Secretary: Colleen O'Reilly, Carney 116, 
617-552-3802, colleen.oreilly@bc.edu 

• Undergraduate Program Assistant: Karen Potterton, 
Carney 114, 617-552-2265, karen.potterton@bc.edu 

• Graduate Program Assistant: Meredith Volker, Carney 
115, 617-552-3781, meredith.volker@bc.edu 

• Faculty E-Mail: To reach any of the History Department 
faculty members, please use the following e-mail address 
format: firstname.lastname@bc.edu 

• World Wide Web: http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas 
/his/history.html 

Undergraduate Program Description 

The Department of History offers the undergraduate student a 
variety of courses in Medieval European, early modern and modern 
European, Russian, East European, American, Latin American, Asian, 
Middle Eastern, and African history. With careful planning and the 
advice of faculty members, students can develop a sequence of cours- 
es that will prepare them for the fields of law, government, foreign ser- 
vice, and careers in various international organizations, in journalism, 
business, or teaching at the elementary, secondary, or college levels. 
Major Requirements 

In addition to the two-semester University Core sequence in 
modern history (selected from courses numbered HS 001 through 
HS 094), a History major is required to take a two-semester 
sequence in American Civilization (HS 181-182). Students planning 
to major in history are strongly encouraged to take the history Core 
in their freshman year and American Civilization in their sophomore 
year. Note that a score of 4 or 5 on the advanced placement test in 



European history fulfills the two-semester University Core require- 
ment in history, and a similar score on the A.P. test in American his- 
tory fulfills the two-semester American Civilization requirement. 

In addition to the prescribed courses listed above, the History 
major is required to complete eight additional courses, including: 
HS 300 The Study and Writing of History (preferably taken in the 
sophomore or junior year); four other upper-division electives (num- 
bered 200-699); and two courses in non-Western history. Note that 
some upper-division electives also satisfy the non- Western require- 
ment. At least three of the electives — including two of the upper- 
division electives — should be in a field approved by the student's 
History Department advisor. For a list of possible fields, consult the 
department's website (http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/avp/cas/his/major. 
html#four). 

Students may take a maximum of four foreign-study courses, 
no more than two of which may be upper-division courses, among 
the ten required courses beyond the University Core. Likewise a 
maximum of two summer courses may be taken for major credit, but 
at least six courses, including HS 300 and two of the upper-division 
courses, must be taken at Boston College during the regular acade- 
mic year. 

In order to facilitate the introduction of research techniques, 
the department offers a variety of Readings and Research opportu- 
nities. These projects must be arranged between the individual stu- 
dent and professor, and then receive the permission of the Director 
of Undergraduate Studies. No more than two courses completed in 
this fashion will count toward the History major requirements. 
Minor Requirements 

The History minor requires six courses. It begins with the two 
Core courses in history and concludes with two upper-division elec- 
tives (numbered 200-699). In between, students can choose two 
other courses freely from among the department's offerings. Because 
the Core courses emphasize Europe, students minoring in history are 
encouraged to take at least one course in non- Western history. No 
more than six of the eighteen required credits can be satisfied 
through advanced placement. A maximum of two independent 
study courses (HS 699 Readings and Research) can count toward 
minor requirements. 
Information for First Year Majors and Non-Majors 

The University Core requirement is a two-semester sequence 
in modern history covering the period between the late Middle Ages 
and the present. All history courses numbered between HS 001-002 
and HS 093-094 fulfill this requirement, but students must take one 
course on the first half of the modern period (late Middle Ages to 
the French Revolution) and one on the second (French Revolution 
to the present). 

All history Core courses cover a broad sweep of time. Because 
so much of modern history has been dominated by Europe and 
because Europe pioneered the crucial historical processes that the 
entire world has since experienced, courses focus particular attention 
on Europe. Nonetheless, each course also traces the changing pat- 
terns of interaction and domination that have characterized the rela- 
tionship between Europe and the non-European world. As a result, 
the European history taught in the Core necessarily covers the star- 
tling economic, intellectual, political, and social changes that have 
come to shape not only the West but also the world as a whole. Each 
history Core course, although covering common themes and a com- 
mon period of time, emphasizes the special interests and expertise of 
the professor. Since specialists in European, American, Latin 
American, African, and South and Asian history teach in the Core, 
courses vary considerably in the material they cover. Students are 



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urged to read the descriptions of each of the department's Core 
offerings and predicate their choice based on the particular empha- 
sis of each class. 

The following shared topics are covered in each History Core 
course: 

First semester: The Italian and Northern Renaissances; the 
Reformation and Counter-Reformation; exploration, trade, and 
slavery; the development of the bureaucratic state; international rela- 
tions and warfare; the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment; 
the development of capitalism; political revolutions; and social struc- 
tures and gender. 

Second semester: The legacy of the French Revolution; modern 
political ideologies; nationalism; modern thought and culture; the 
development of modern industry; imperialism, colonialism, and 
racism; the Russian Revolution and the World Wars; the Depression 
and Fascism; the Cold War and Decolonization; and social struc- 
tures and gender. 

Because all of these courses are designed as thematic units, stu- 
dents should continue in the same class for the entire year, but upon 
completion of the first half of one course, students may enroll in 
another second-half course. In no case, however, will students be 
permitted to take the courses out of order. The first half must be 
completed before enrolling in the second. Students are strongly 
urged to fulfill the History Core requirement in their freshman year, 
or at the latest, during their sophomore year. Students planning to 
study abroad during their junior year are strongly advised to com- 
plete their History Core before embarking on such studies. 

All the Core history courses numbered HS 001-002 through 
HS 079-080 consist of large classes taught by a team of professors 
(either jointly or by splitting the year between them). All Core class- 
es meet twice each week for lectures, and a third time in groups of 
15-20 students for discussion of selected topics. These weekly dis- 
cussion sections are an integral part of each Core course. 

All Core history courses assign between 100 and 200 pages of 
reading weekly, and require at least one paper and map assignment 
in addition to examinations. 

The Core history program is also offered in three other slight- 
ly different formats: HS 063-064 is an intensive small class designed 
for Honors students and HS 081-082 is taught in small classes (35 
students). Finally, HS 093 (spring term) covers the topics of the first- 
half of the Core; HS 094 (fall term) covers the topics of the second 
half of the Core; and these reverse sequence courses are intended 
solely for students who need to begin or complete their History Core 
courses out of the usual semester pattern. 
Information for Study Abroad 

Many History majors profit greatly from spending part or all of 
their junior year abroad. Six history courses (beyond the Core), 
including HS 300, must be taken at Boston College during the reg- 
ular academic year. This limits the total number of courses taken 
abroad for major credit to four and to a maximum of two for upper- 
division credit. Students seeking major elective credit need only 
show that they passed a course offered in a history department. 
Students seeking upper-division credit must arrange this with the 
Director of Undergraduate Studies after they complete the course. In 
making their case for upper-division credit, they should present the 
course syllabus and the paper(s) written for the course. (Save every- 
thing!) In spite of the limitations on courses accepted for major cred- 
it, students who have gotten a good start on Core and major require- 
ments before leaving for study abroad should have no trouble com- 
pleting them, even they spend an entire year abroad. 

Students who are contemplating a senior honors thesis and 
who will be abroad during the normal application process in the 



spring of their junior year are strongly urged to plan ahead. They 
should try to establish a thesis topic and to identify a faculty mem- 
ber willing to supervise their work before departing, and verify that 
they will be able to be in e-mail contact with their thesis advisor 
while abroad. 

If you have any questions about your study abroad, please con- 
tact Prof Paul Spagnoli, Director of Undergraduate Studies. 

Graduate Program Description 
Introduction 

The M.A. and Ph.D. degrees are offered with concentrations in 
Medieval history, early Modern European history. Modern European 
history, American history, and Latin American history. The depart- 
ment also offers coursework in African history. Middle Eastern his- 
tory and Asian history. 

The department sponsors interdisciplinary work leading to 
Master's degrees in European National Studies and in Medieval 
Studies. The Master's of Art in Teaching (M.A.T.) program is admin- 
istered by the Lynch Graduate School of Education. It requires 
admission to both the Lynch School of Education Graduate 
Programs and to the Department of History. Course requirements 
vary depending upon the candidate's prior teaching experience, how- 
ever, all Master's programs leading to certification in secondary edu- 
cation include practica experiences in addition to course work. 
Students seeking certification in Massachusetts are required to pass 
the Massachusetts Educators Certification Test. For further informa- 
tion on the M.A.T, please refer to the Lynch School of Education 
Graduate Programs section entitled, "Master's Programs in 
Secondary Teaching," or call the Office of Graduate Admissions, 
LSOE, at 617-552-4214. 
Doctor of Philosophy in History 

The Ph.D. is a research degree and requires special commit- 
ment and skills. While the degree is not granted for routine adher- 
ence to certain regulations or for the successful completion of a spec- 
ified number of courses, there are certain basic requirements. 

Faculty Advisor: During the first semester of full-time study, 
doctoral students choose a faculty advisor, who oversees the student's 
progress in preparing for comprehensive exams and in developing a 
dissertation topic. 

Course Requirements: Students entering into the Ph.D. program 
without M.A.s are required to complete 14 courses (42 credits); 12 
of these must be taken prior to comprehensive exams. Students 
entering with M.A.s may transfer in 3 courses (9 credits) if they 
wish. All students must complete at least one research seminar 
(although we strongly urge students to complete two) and all must 
complete the two-semester Core Colloquium in their first year. All 
students must also take the Dissertation Seminar within twelve 
months of passing their comprehensive exams. Finally, all students 
concentrating in American history must take the year-long 
American Colloquium. 

Plan of Study: By the conclusion of the first semester, and after 
full consultation with their faculty advisor and the Director of 
Graduate Studies, students file a plan of study leading to the com- 
prehensive examination. This plan of study consists of three areas of 
concentration, including one designated as the major area. From 
within this major area, students choose two fields of study. Because 
students are expected to develop a mature understanding of this 
major area as a whole, one of these two major fields should be gen- 
eral in nature. Students then select one field of study from each of 
two additional areas of concentration. 

Usually faculty require that students take at least some formal 
coursework in each field and expect students to develop and master 



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a reading list of important books and articles. With the approval of 
the advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies, students may offer, 
as one of the two minor areas, a discipline related to history or a 
topic within that cuts across traditional geographical or chronologi- 
cal boundaries. When considered necessary to a student's program, 
the department may require advanced-level work in a related disci- 
pline, either as a minor field or as supplemental work. This plan of 
study may be reviewed, evaluated and revised whenever necessary. 
However, changes must be approved by the faculty advisor and the 
Director of Graduate Studies. 

Language Requirements: Ph.D. candidates, with the exception 
of medievalists, must pass two language exams. Students concentrat- 
ing in American history may substitute competency in a field of par- 
ticular methodological or theoretical relevance to their program of 
study for competency in a second foreign language. To do so, stu- 
dents must petition the Graduate Committee for the substitution, 
and explain the nature of the field and its importance to the plan of 
study, particularly the dissertation. The student's faculty advisor cer- 
tifies that the student has acquired the appropriate skills and knowl- 
edge. Medievalists must pass three language exams, one of which 
must be Latin or Greek. 

The Comprehensive Examination: The student's oral compre- 
hensive examination will be conducted by an examining board com- 
posed of four faculty members with whom the student has done 
fields. A written examination may be substituted for an oral exam at 
the joint discretion of the student and the student's committee. 

The Dissertation: Students must have a dissertation topic before 
taking and passing comprehensive exams. The last two courses (six 
credits) earned for the degree, taken after the comprehensive exams, 
will be focused explicitly on the dissertation. These should include 
the Dissertation Seminar and an independent study with the faculty 
advisor. Dissertation proposals, written in the Dissertation Seminar, 
must be approved by the faculty advisor and filed with the depart- 
ment. Students in residence while writing their dissertation are 
required to attend the department's bi-monthly Dissertation 
Workshop. When finished, the completed dissertation must be 
approved by a committee of three readers — the faculty advisor and 
two other faculty members — and approved by the Director of 
Graduate Studies. It must also be defended at a public oral defense. 
Master of Arts Programs 

Requirements: The M.A. degree in history requires 30 graduate 
credits, a distribution requirement for each particular program, and 
an oral comprehensive examination. The one exception to this is the 
European National Studies Program, which requires 36 credits. 

Students are not allowed to complete the M.A. program by 
attending only summer sessions, but are required to take a total of at 
least four courses (12 credits) during the regular academic year. 

Plan of Study: All candidates for the M.A. in history are encour- 
aged to pursue an individual course of study developed in conjunc- 
tion with their faculty advisor and selected by the student during the 
first year in the program. In making their selection of courses and 
seminars, students are urged to widen their chronological and cul- 
tural horizons while deepening and specifying one special area of 
concentration. 

Students must choose a major and minor field. As many as 
seven courses (twenty-one hours) can be taken in the major field. 
Major fields for the M.A. are the following: 

• American History 

• Medieval History 

• Early Modern European History 

• Modern European History (encompassing English, Irish, 
Continental European, Eastern European, and Russian) 



• Latin American History 

The minor field is made up of a minimum of three courses 
(nine hours) , at least one of which must be a graduate level course. 
Minor fields can be chosen from the same list of major fields or can 
be more conceptual or historiographical. Such fields, for example, 
could include a field in economic, social or labor history; or could 
concern race, gender or world history. Minor fields must be 
approved by the Director of Graduate Study. 

Students whose prior academic preparation warrants an excep- 
tion to the above requirements may, with the consent of their facul- 
ty advisor, request permission to substitute a different proportion or 
variety of courses and areas than those generally required. The 
opportunity for study in a major or minor area is open to the extent 
that the department offers sufficient courses in the student's area of 
interest. 

Students may study in departments outside history, and, with 
the permission of the Graduate Committee, a candidate whose advi- 
sor so recommends may earn as many as six credits in classics, eco- 
nomics, english, political science, sociology or other related disci- 
plines. Graduate credits earned in a related discipline will be includ- 
ed in the distribution requirements for the appropriate area. 

In addition to the general requirements for the M.A. degree, 
students in the History program are required to complete a seminar 
in their major area. 

Language Requirement: Master's candidates must pass a foreign 
language reading examination, ordinarily in French, German, 
Russian or Spanish. Another foreign language, when relevant to the 
research of the student, may be substituted with permission of the 
Graduate Committee. 

Exam and Thesis: Students must take an oral comprehensive 
examination administered by the student's advisor and two addition- 
al faculty members, one from the major and one from the minor area. 

Students may complete the Master's degree with or without a 
thesis. Those wishing to write a thesis should complete all of the 
other requirements for the degree and then request permission. The 
thesis counts for six credits and must be approved by the candidate's 
faculty advisor. 
European National Studies 

The M.A. in history is also offered in a program on the histo- 
ry and language of a single European nation. At present programs are 
offered in British, French, German, Irish, and Russian Studies. 
Except as noted below, students in European National Studies must 
complete 36 credits of approved courses and pass an oral compre- 
hensive examination. 

At least 18 credits must be in history, of which at least six cred- 
its should be general European surveys, including one colloquium, 
and at least nine credits in the history of one European nationality, 
including a seminar in which that national language is used for 
research. Except for those in British and Irish Studies, students must 
complete at least 12 credits in appropriate foreign language and lit- 
erature courses, and receive a high pass on a written examination in 
that language. Students with sufficient background to enter language 
courses at the intermediate level or above may be permitted to take 
only six credits in language and literature courses and then be 
exempted from six credits of work toward the degree. 

Students in Irish Studies, in addition to 30 credits in history, 
Irish literature and other relevant disciplines, must take six credits in 
beginning Irish Gaelic. Students in British Studies must take a total 
of 30 credits in history, English literature and other appropriate 
courses, as well as fulfill the department's usual foreign language 
requirement. 



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Medieval Studies 

Students interested in a M.A. in Medieval Studies will be 
expected to take at least nine credits in Medieval history and at least 
six credits of graduate study in a related discipline. If the student is 
doing a thesis, it will be written under the direction of a member of 
the History Department and will be read by a member of the depart- 
ment in the related field of study. The candidate must pass a lan- 
guage exam in Latin. 
Applications to the M.A. and Ph.D. Programs 

The deadline for applications to the graduate programs in his- 
tory is February 1. Ph.D. and M.A. applicants must submit GRE 
general scores (the GRE in history is not required), official under- 
graduate and graduate transcripts, at least three letters of recom- 
mendation, a personal statement emphasizing intellectual interests, 
a writing sample (a paper written for a recent course or one written 
expressly for the application), and all the application forms. 
Funding 

The History Department has a highly competitive Ph.D. pro- 
gram, but one which guarantees five years of funding to all incom- 
ing Ph.D. students contingent upon satisfactory academic perfor- 
mance and progress towards the degree, as well as satisfactory per- 
formance in teaching as evaluated by the faculty of the Department 
of History. 

Students interested in the Doctoral or Master's programs should 
write to: Director of Graduate Studies History Department, Boston 
College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, e-mail: volker@bc.edu. 

Ph.D. Fields of Study 
American History 

U.S. to 1877 

U.S. since 1860 

Intellectual and Cultural 

Social and Economic 

Urban 

Race and Ethnicity 

Religion 

Diplomatic 

Gender and Women 
Medieval 

Social and Economic 

Religious and Cultural 

Anglo-Saxon and Carolingian 

Anglo-Norman and Angevin 

Byzantine 

Medieval Archeology 
Early Modern European History 

Religion 

Intellectual and Cultural 

Social and Economic 

Gender and Women 

Early Modern Britain 

Early Modern France 
European History 

European History 1789-1914 

European History 1870-1945 

Contemporary Europe 

Intellectual and Cultural 

Social and Economic 

Diplomatic 

Imperialism 

Modern Britain 



Modern France 

Modern Germany 

Modern Ireland 

Modern Italy 
Russian and Eastern European History 

Eastern Europe 

Pre-Revolutionary Russian History 

Soviet 

Polish 
Latin American History 

Colonial Latin America 

Modern Latin America 

Central American/Caribbean 
Other Areas — (Minor only) 

China 

Africa 

Middle East 

East Asia 

Japan 

South Asia 

India 

World 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
HS 001 Modern History I: Cultural and Institutional History 
(FaU: 3) 

Corequisite: HS 003 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 
Followed in spring semester by HS 002 

This course surveys the historical development of Europe from 
the Renaissance to the present with the intention of explaining how 
the unique western society in which we live today came into being. 
The great expansion of European power and culture since 1500 has 
made the development of Europe a key to understanding the mod- 
ern world as a whole. The first semester will cover the period from 
the Renaissance through the French Revolution. 
John Rosser 

HS 002 Modern History II: Cultural and Institutional History 
(Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HS 004 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 

This course, although intensive and demanding, is designed for 
any student (major or non-major) who is interested in tracing the evo- 
lution of western society to the present day. Special emphasis will be 
paid to the social, political and institutional stresses and changes, with 
attention also to the relation of the factors with the world of ideas and 
the arts. Special topics will also include the rise of absolute states, war- 
fare and diplomacy in the old regime, the Enlightenment, the French 
Revolution, the search for new authorities as represented by the ide- 
ologies of conservatism, liberalism, communism and facism. 
John Heineman 

HS 005 Modern History I: Social and Economic Development of 
Europe (Fall: 3) 
Corequisite: HS 007 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 
Followed in spring semester by HS 006 

This course traces the changes that have created today's world 
out of the very different world of the late Middle Ages. We will 
examine the move from a unified Christendom to a divided Europe 



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and study the growth of a bureaucratized and controlhng state and a 
capitahst market economy. We will also analyze the changing social 
structure of Europe, the interactions between Europe and the wider 
world, the struggles between the proponents and critics of 
Protestantism, constitutionalism, and capitalism. 
The Department 

HS 006 Modern History II: Social and Economic Development 
of Europe (Spring: 3) 

Corequisite: HS 008 

Satisfies History Core Requirement 

This course seeks to acquaint students with the ways in which 
todays Europe (and today's wider world) developed out of the very 
different world of the late eighteenth century. It centers on what 
have been called "the plagues and pleasures" of a competitive market 
economy, tracing the rise of that economy in the nineteenth centu- 
ry as well as the challenges it has endured and the changes it has 
experienced since then. The course fulfills the second half of the uni- 
versity core requirement in history. 
Paul Spagnoli 

HS Oil Modern History I: Political and Social History of Europe 
(Fall: 3) 

Corequisite: HS 013 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 
Followed in spring semester by HS 012 

This course will survey the major developments in Europe from 
the Renaissance to the French Revolution. Emphasis will be placed 
upon social and cultural developments, particularly as seen through 
overseas expansion and the formation of the modern state. 
Lawrence Wolff 

HS 012 Modern History II: Political and Social History of 
Modern Europe (Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HS 014 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 

This course will survey the major developments in modern his- 
tory from the French Revolution to the present. Particular empha- 
sis will be placed on the progress of the industrial and democratic 
revolutions and the major responses to each — liberalism, socialism, 
and fascism — and the wars, conflicts and transformations to which 
they led. 
James Cronin 

HS 015 Modern History I: Cultural History of Modern Europe 
(Fall: 3) 

Corequisite: HS 017 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 
Followed in spring semester by HS 016 

This course examines the interactions of the persons, ideas, 
institutions, and movements that have shaped the European experi- 
ence from the Renaissance through the Reconstruction of Europe 
after World War II. The special emphasis during the first semester 
will be on the Renaissance, and the Reformation, the discoveries of 
explorers and scientists, and the Enlightenment. The second semes- 
ter will cover the period since the French Revolution. 
The Department 

HS 016 Modern History II: Cultural History of Modern Europe 
(Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HS 018 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 

The continuation of HS 015. 
Rev. Francis Murphy 



HS 023 Modern History I: Social and Cultural History of 
Europe (Fall: 3) 

Corequisite: HS 025 

Satisfies History Core Requirement 

Followed in spring semester by HS 024 

This course surveys the evolution of western Europe from the end 
of the Middle Ages through the 1989 collapse of the Soviet Empire. 
Special attention is given to the following issues: the triumph of liberal 
capitalism, the rise of the bourgeoisie, the development of the modern 
state, the emergence of new forms of conquest and domination over the 
natural and non-European worlds. We will examine these aspects of the 
West's development with particular emphasis on gender, race, class, and 
other forms of difference. The first semester will cover the period from 
the Renaissance through the French Revolution. 
Prasannan Parthasarathi 

HS 024 Modern History II: Social and Cultural History of 
Europe (Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HS 026 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 

The continuation of HS 023. 
Peter Weiler 

HS 031 Modern History I: Europe and the Atlantic Community 
(FaU: 3) 

Corequisite: HS 033 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 
Followed in spring semester by HS 032 

This course is a study of the Atlantic community and its role in 
the emergence of the world economy since 1500. Topics to receive 
primary consideration include (first semester) the structure of tradi- 
tional European and American societies, the impact of European 
expansion on European and American society and economy, the 
emergence of colonial America, and the age of revolution. 
Alan Rogers 

HS 032 Modern History II: Europe and the Atlantic Community 
(Spring: 3) 

Corequisite: HS 034 

Satisfies History Core Requirement 

This course will explore the emergence of the modern world 
from the era of the French Revolution to the end of the twentieth 
century. We will pay particular attention to the the interrelated his- 
tories of the societies bordering the Atlantic. Topics addressed 
include the transnational evolution of political ideologies; the 
impact of slave emancipation in the nineteenth century; the recur- 
ring importance of nationalism; imperialism and its discontents; the 
Cold War and its legacies. 
The Department 

HS 041 Modern History I: A Cultural History of Europe from 
Pestilence to Enlightenment, 1346-1786 (Fall: 3) 
Corequisite: HS 043 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 
Followed in spring semester by HS 042 

This course explores a set of crucial problems that have preoc- 
cupied modern thinkers and artists: how class and gender shape 
human life; cross-cultural encounters and shifts in knowledge; con- 
struction of group identities; the impact of technology; ways in which 
we construct use, and eclipse wonder; competing claims of freedom 
and equality, individual and community, universal and particular. 
First semester includes: plague, scholasticism, nominalism; cannibals, 
exoticism, que sais-je?; wars of religion and reformation; Calvin and 



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Hobbes; cogito ergo sum; Copernican Revolution, empiricism and 

skepticism; Chinese rites and Persian harems; fugue versus sonata; 

Candide, Rousseau's "New Man," 1776; The Marriage of Figaro. 

Stephen Schloesser, S.J. 

HS 042 Modern History II: A Cultural History of Europe from 

Bastille to Berlin, 1789-1989 (Spring: 3) 

Corequisite: HS 044 

Satisfies History Core Requirement 

This course explores a set of crucial problems that have preoc- 
cupied modern thinkers and artists. Second semester includes: 
French Revolution, Napoleon, Romanticism, industrialization, 
Frankenstein, socialism; 1848, Communist Manifesto and Socialist 
International; Liberalism, nationalism, imperialism; Darwin, race, 
orientalism; urbanism, consumerism, kleptomania; positivism and 
Decadence; prostitution, hysteria, eugenics; 1917; Lenin, Hitler, 
Guernica; Bauhaus, surrealism, dissonance; Nausea; decolonization; 
the Bomb; the Berlin Wall; Beethoven's Ninth. 
Stephen Schloesser, S.J. 

HS 045-046 Modern History: Europe and the World 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HS 047-048 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 

Because so much of modern history has been dominated by 
Europe, and because Europe pioneered the crucial historical process- 
es that the entire world has since experienced, this course focuses 
particular attention on Europe. Nonetheless, it also traces the chang- 
ing patterns of interaction and domination that have characterized 
the relationship between Europe and the non-European world. Thus 
it covers the startling economic, intellectual, political, and social 
changes that have come to shape not only the West but also the 
world as a whole. The first semester examines the period c. 1500- 
1800. The second semester examines the period c. 1800-present. 
The Department 

HS 051 Modern History I: The Rise of Europe in the World 
(Fall: 3) 

Corequisite: HS 053 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 
Followed in spring semester by HS 052 

This course provides an introduction to the history of Europe 
between the Renaissance and the French Revolution. Many of the 
momentous changes that transformed Europe during this time arose 
from how European monarchs, philosophers, scientists, artists, cler- 
gymen, merchants, farmers, and even peasants responded to their 
increasing contact with the peoples, products, cultures, and ideas 
from Asia, the Middle East, Africa, and the New World. 
Burke Griggs 

HS 052 Modern History II: The Rise of Europe in the World 
(Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HS 054 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 

The continuation of HS 051- 
Paul Breines 

HS 060 Modern History II: Rise of Europe: East and West 
(Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HS 062 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 

Not long ago the oil wealth of the Middle East seemed to 
threaten the prosperity of the West — such a fear is not completely 
new. In 1500, Europe also trembled before a middle Eastern power, 
the Ottoman Empire. Over the centuries Europe built a resilient sys- 
tem of states, introduced scientific and technological innovations. 



fostered economic growth, and expanded its territory overseas. By 

the twentieth century Europe was all-powerful. What have been the 

factors behind Europe's rise to power during this early period? What 

has undermined Europe subsequently? The course will will cover the 

period since 1800. 

The Department 

HS 067 Modern History I: Europe and the Americas I (Fall: 3) 

Corequisite: HS 069 

Satisfies History Core Requirement 

Followed in spring semester by HS 068 

The fall course runs from the 1490s to the 1790s and is a sur- 
vey of the rise of capitalism and colonialism and their impact (eco- 
nomic, social, and cultural) upon Europeans and Latin Americans 
(Indigenous, Iberian, and African). This includes coverage of the rise 
of the Portuguese, Spanish, Dutch, and English empires, the Atlantic 
slave trade, and the revolutions in England, France, and their 
American colonies. The period is viewed as a prolonged revolution in 
ideas — religious, political, intellectual, scientific, economic, and cul- 
tural — and their representation in attitudes, institutions, and events. 
Sergio Serulnikov 

HS 068 Modern History: Europe and the Americas II (Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HS 070 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 

The continuation of these ideas in the modern period is exam- 
ined by the spring course, which covers the 1790s to the 1990s, 
emphasizing the growth of nation-states in Europe, Latin America, 
and the Caribbean; emancipation and immigration; the continued 
expansion of the capitalist world system and Europe's empires; the 
rise of fascism and socialism; and the impact of the Cold War upon 
Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean. 
Deborah Levenson-Estrada 

HS 081-082 Modern History: Europe and the World 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 

Because so much of modern history has been dominated by 
Europe, and because Europe pioneered the crucial historical process- 
es that the entire world has since experienced, this course focuses 
particular attention on Europe. Nonetheless, it also traces the chang- 
ing patterns of interaction and domination that have characterized 
the relationship between Europe and the non-European world. Thus 
it covers the startling economic, intellectual, political, and social 
changes that have come to shape not only the West but also the 
world as a whole. The first semester examines the period c. 1 500- 
1800. The second semester examines the period c. 1800-present. 
The Department 

HS 093 Modern History: Europe and the World (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies History Core Requirement 

This is a reverse sequence section of the Core. This is the first half of 
the history Core, although it is taught during the second semester. 

Because so much of modern history has been dominated by 
Europe, and because Europe pioneered the crucial historical process- 
es that the entire world has since experienced, this course focuses 
particular attention on Europe. Nonetheless, it also traces the chang- 
ing patterns of interaction and domination that have characterized 
the relationship between Europe and the non-European world. Thus 
it covers the startling economic, intellectual, political, and social 
changes that have come to shape not only the West but also the 
world as a whole. The first semester examines the period c. 1 500- 
1800. The second semester examines the period c. 1800-present. 
The Department 



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HS 094 Modem History: Europe and the World (Fall: 3) 

Satisfies History Core Requirement 

This is the second part of the Core, but it is given in the fall semester. 

See course description under HS 093. 
The Department 

HS 103 Celluloid Salvation: Redemption in 20th-century 
Cinema and History (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

How, in the modern world, is redemption possible? 
Theologians, laypeople, and artists have grappled with this question 
throughout the twentieth century. From Capras faith in the indi- 
vidual's power to radiate good in everyday life to Keislowski's mysti- 
cal vision of a world suffused with coincidence and interconnection, 
this course will use film to explore views of redemption (or notions 
of its impossibility) in the modern world. 
Lynn Lyerly 
Stephen Schloesser 
HS 104 American Presidency (Spring: 3) 

This course examines the single most important position of 
power in our political system, the men who shaped it, and the elec- 
tions that placed them in that office. Although the course begins 
with the drafting of the Constitution, the focus is on the twentieth 
century. 
Mark Gelfand 

HS 107 Internship (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 093 

A one credit pass/fail educational experience. 
The Department 

HS 111 America's War in Vietnam (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course will examine America's thirty-year military involve- 
ment in Southeast Asia, one of the most controversial episodes in 
U.S. history. Students will read a wide variety of primary and sec- 
ondary sources, from recently declassified state and Defense 
Department documents to poetry and short stories. Course readings 
are selected from various points on the left-right political spectrum, 
with both "hawks" and "doves" receiving their day in court. Lectures 
will include the origins of the Cold War, the Eisenhower, Kennedy, 
Johnson, and Nixon presidencies, antiwar activism and other 
Vietnam era movements, and American soldiers' experience during 
and after service in Vietnam. 
Seth Jacobs 

HS 130 History of Boston (FaU: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

A survey of Boston from the 1820s to the present as it has 
changed from a town to a city to a metropolitan center. A full range 
of topics will be covered (aided by guest lecturers) including the 
city's physical growth, political conflicts, social structure (immigrant 
and Brahmin), literary achievements, architectural splendor, eco- 
nomic growth, social turmoil, and contemporary problems. The 
course will emphasize the traditions and changes that have made 
Boston the influential and exciting place it is and how and why the 
diverse population has responded. 
Andrew Bunie 

HS 144 World War II— The Last Just War (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course offers a historical perspective of the causes and 
course of the greatest world conflagration. The emphasis will be 
upon the war's global dimensions and thus will not concentrate one- 
sidely upon any of the major theaters. Instead, it will integrate the 
events and developments and offer an interpretation to help students 



understand the ways the war created the present world situation. 

The first third will cover the diplomatic disputes; the next third will 

discuss the major campaigns and strategies; the final section analyzes 

the broad impact socially, technologically, politically and culturally 

of the war. 

John L. Heineman 

HS 151 East Asia: The Making of a World Region (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

This course offers an introduction to the history of East Asia as 
a world region, from the China-centered order of pre-modern times 
to multi-polar integration (and its opposite) at the end of the twen- 
tieth century. The focus lies on mapping the changing cultural, 
political and economic relations between China, Korea and Japan 
with particular attention to evolving European notions of (and activ- 
ities in) the "Far East," which was often contrasted to a putative 
"West" in modern discourses of power. Foregrounding "history" 
rather that "civilization" helps us discover the global interconnec- 
tions in which East Asia occupied a crucial place. 
Franziska Seraphim 

HS 161 Biographies of Power in Latin America (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Cross listed with RL 609 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 
This course is taught in Spanish. 

This course will explore the role of major historical personali- 
ties in the political, social, and cultural history of Latin America 
from the colonial regime to the 20th century. Our goal will be to 
analyze the ideas and deeds of Latin American men and women who 
had a significant impact in shaping politics, gender relations, ethnic 
identities, and social movements. 
Sergio Serulnikov 

HS 164 Historical Archeology (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Not open to students who have taken HS 224 

Of what use is archeology to the historian? How do the goals 
and techniques of historical archeology complement those of tradi- 
tional historical research? How has historical archeology developed 
since the early nineteenth century, when it was little more than trea- 
sure-hunting for European museums? In exploring these and other 
questions, our attention will focus on ancient Egypt, on the ancient 
and medieval Mediterranean, and on the Americas. 
John Rosser 

HS 175 The History of Civil Rights and Women's Lib (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

African American freedom struggles and campaigns for civil rights 
have often moved in parallel lines and even intersected with the women's 
liberation movement. This course looks at the origins, development, pol- 
itics, culture and exuberance of both the African American struggle for 
civil rights and the radical women's liberation movement, 1830-1975. 
We wiU examine issues such as the anti-slavery movement, campaigns for 
suffrage, the anti-lynching movement, feminism, black nationalism, 
school desegregation, abortion rights, and the labor movement. 
Crystal Feimster 

HS 1 80 Introduction to Black Urban History: Migration, 
Modernization and Culture Making (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course examines aspects of the social and cultural history of 
four black urban communities: Boston, New York, Chicago and Los 



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Angeles. Students will be exposed to the varying methodologies used 
to study black hfe in the metropolis. An exploration of historical and 
sociological source texts, literature and the arts will reveal black peo- 
ple's both stratified and dynamic engagement with urban living. The 
primary focus entails an examination of race, class, gender and 
regional formations in relationship to migration and urbanization. 
Moreover, discussions of black "high" and "popular" culture will help 
students understand how black people both shaped and were shaped. 
Davarian Baldwin 

HS 181-182 American Civilization I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

A survey of the political, social, economic, and intellectual 
developments that have shaped and influenced the growth of the 
United States from a colonial appendage to a world power. The 
course seeks to provide a firm chronological foundation for the study 
of the American past, but seeks to go beyond narrative and to pro- 
vide analytical insights into the institutions, society, economy, and 
ideas upon which American Civilization is founded. Consideration 
will be given to continuity, change, and conflict in American society. 
The Department 

HS 189-190 Afro-American History I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Cross listed with BK 104-105 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 
Not open to students who have taken HS 283-284 

See course description in the Black Studies Department. 
Karen Miller 

HS 205 Native Americans in U.S. History (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Ctdtural Diversity Core Requirement 

This course will focus on the history of Native Americans in 
the Continental United States from the pre-Columbian period to 
the present. Topics will include findings and controversies in the 
archeological record, pre-Columbian culture, native-European rela- 
tions in the colonial era, Indian removal, reservation policy and the 
"genocide" debate in the nineteenth century; and Native Americans 
in the modern era. While this course will cover government policy 
and "white" images of native Americans, the primary focus will be 
on the social history of Native Americans themselves and how dif- 
ferent disciplines seek to understand that history. 
Jeff Singleton 

HS 208 Middle East in the Twentieth Century (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

Through the last eighty years the Middle East has been the site 
of many wars and conflicts. More recently it has become the most 
important source of the world's energy. This combination of strife 
and economic power has made it a vital and sensitive area for the 
entire globe. 
Benjamin Braude 

HS 213 U.S. Foreign Policy and South Africa (Fall: 3) 
Cross Listed with BK 365 

See course description in the Black Studies Department. 
James Woodard 

HS 228 Byzantium and the Crusades (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Not open to students who have taken HS 338 

Why did the Crusading movement, called by Pope Urban II in 
1095 to fight Muslims in the Holy Land, end up storming the walls 
of Constantinople in 1204 in order to destroy the Christian empire 
of Byzantium? This is the central question that the course attempts 
to answer, and it will do so through an examination of primary 



sources in translation. Our consideration looks at the deterioration 

of East- West relations in the centuries immediately preceding the 

conquest of Constantinople, and focuses on how the Crusading 

movement threatened Byzantium from its very conception in 1095. 

John Rosser 

HS 235 American Catholic History (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course will examine the history of the Roman Catholic 
church in America from 1492 to the present. Though the territory 
which became the United States was first settled by Europeans, 
Catholicism has existed in a largely non-Catholic America. We will 
examine how the church defined itself in that context, exploring 
such issues as: the establishment of the organization of the church 
throughout the country; the role of priests and religious women; 
immigration and the changing nature of the Catholic population; 
nativism and anti-Catholicism; and the growth of educational and 
charitable institutions. 
James O'Toole 

HS 241 Capstone: Boston's College — ^Your Life (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Cross listed with UN 532 

See course description in the University Courses section. 
/. Joseph Burns, Associate Dean 
HS 244 History of American Religion (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course will explore the varieties of religious experience in 
America from the establishment of European colonies in the seven- 
teenth century to the present. What have been the major religious 
movements in the United States, which has been described as "a 
nation with the soul of a church"? Surveying the major denomina- 
tions and groups, especially within Christianity and Judaism, we will 
examine what Americans have believed about fundamental religious 
questions. We will also examine what religious people have done on 
the basis of their beliefs. We will study the ideas and actions of both 
religious leaders and average believers. 
James O'Toole 

HS 285 African American Life Narratives (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Ctdtural Diversity Core Requirement 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

A recurring theme in African American life histories is the nar- 
ration of the moment when the black subject or author first becomes 
aware of himself/herself as a racial being in a society in which black- 
ness has meaning. This course examines how these kinds of 
moments shaped individual perspectives of personal and racial iden- 
tity, and uses narratives and autobiographies to analyze how mean- 
ings of blackness are shaped by region, class, gender, sexuality, and 
historical context. 
Karen Miller 

HS 292 The Witch, the Church, and the Law (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

During the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries a convergence 
of political, social, and religious movements produced thousands of 
trials for crimes of witchcraft, sorcery, and superstition throughout 
Europe. This course explores these trials, particularly emphasizing 
their legal and ecclesiastical aspects. Related issues of popular belief 
in sorcery, magic, and diabolical activity will also be considered. 
Attention will be devoted to the question of why women were so fre- 
quently among the accused. 
Virginia Reinburg 



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HS 297 Women in Russian History and Culture (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

The role of women in Russian history and culture, from the 
ancient Scythian warrior maidens to the present day. We will study 
proptypes of women in Russian literature, the 18th Century 
Empresses, the women's liberation movement, women in the 
Russian Revolution, the NEEP, Stalinism, and World War II, the 
development of natural childbirth, postwar Super Moms and their 
critics, the revision to patriarchy after the fall of Communism, and 
the rise of a new feminism. We will explore the impact of political 
ideology, social-economic structures, religion, folkloric traditions, 
family organization, demography, and literary images on the lives 
and status of women. 
Roberta Manning 

HS 300 Study and Writing of History (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094; histo- 
ry major status 

Each section offers a different topic. 
Required for history majors 

The purpose of these courses will be to introduce students to 
the methodology and process of writing history by focusing on a 
topic for which a body of source material is readily available. Each 
student is expected to use pre-selected documentary material to pre- 
pare a major research paper 
The Department 

HS 300.13 The Study and Writing of History: Boston's 
Neighborhoods (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094; history 
major status 

An historical look at Boston through parts of its "neighbor- 
hoods," including the South End, the North End, South Boston, 
East Boston, Jamaica Plain, Roxbury, Charlestown and Dorchester 
Andrew Bunie 

HS 300.25 The Study and Writing of History: History of Civil 
Rights (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094; history 
major status 
Karen Miller 

HS 300.41 The Study and Writing of History: Imperial Rome 
(Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094; history 
major status 

The course will investigate the Roman Empire at its height, 
from A.D. 14-180. Certain themes will be explored, including the 
role of the emperor and of the imperial court, military conquest, the 
rise of Christianity, slavery, and daily life. The emphasis of the course 
is on the textual analysis of primary sources (in translation), includ- 
ing the works of Tacitus, Suetonius, Pliny the Younger, St. Paul, 
Celsus, and Josephus. Artistic and archeological sources (including 
Pompeii and Hadrian's Wall) will also be used to aid our historical 
understanding of the period. 
John Rosser 

HS 300.75 The Study and Writing of History: Anglo-Irish 
Relations, 1939-1949 (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094; history 
major status 

This course will examine the evolution and transformation of 
the Anglo-Irish relationship from the outbreak of World War II, 
when Ireland declared itself a neutral, to the establishment of the 
Irish Republic in 1949. Specific attention will be given to the means 
by which Ireland managed to remain the only neutral dominion as 



it gradually disengaged itself to form the British Commonwealth, 
while at the same time obtaining from Britain, via The Ireland Act 
of 1949, a most favored nation status. Issues that most affected the 
Anglo-Irish relationship were military, economic, cultural and immi- 
gration concerns. 
Thomas Hachey 

HS 300.76 Hiroshima in History and Memory (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094; history 
major status 

Whether seen from the air or experienced on the ground, 
whether interpreted as the end of the Pacific War or the beginning 
of the nuclear age, the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki 
loom large not only in American and Japanese historical conscious- 
ness, but also in a global political culture. Clearly, the bombings 
were a product of history but also acquired a history of their own 
through the ways in which they were remembered over more than 
half a century. This course locates "Hiroshima" in the context of the 
Asia-Pacific War, the Cold War, and their legacies and encourages 
students to explore the relationship between history and memory 
through an independent research project. 
Franziska Seraphim 

HS 300.77 The Study and Writing of History: Travel and 
Espionage (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

For generations travelers have journeyed through the Middle 
East as spies, scholars, missionaries, aesthetes, eccentrics and adven- 
turers. The legacy of their literature has enriched and distorted our 
own culture and our view of the East. This course will examine the 
motives of the travelers and the impact of their writings. Specific top- 
ics to be considered include: psychology of the traveler, works of trav- 
el as history, the genre of travel literature, views of Islam and Muslims, 
response to and reception of the foreigner, Muslim travelers, the 
romantic impulse for travel and the effect of the industrial revolution. 
Benjamin Braude 

HS 300.79 The Study and Writing of History: Authoritarianism 
and Democracy in Latin America (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094; history 
major status 

This course is aimed at providing students a firsthand experi- 
ence in historical research and writing. Its general topic is democra- 
cy and authoritarianism in twentieth century Latin America. 
Selected readings are intended to offer examples of how social scien- 
tist have examined the rise of the different types of authoritarian 
governments in the region. Based on the analysis of primary mater- 
ial, students will investigate a case study from any country in the 
region focusing on some of the factors (ideology, international con- 
text, social movements, historical patterns of military-civil society 
relations, etc.) that have undermined the consolidation of represen- 
tative, inclusive political systems. 
Sergio Serulnikov 

HS 300.80 The Study and Writing of History: Russia and the 
West (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094; history 
major status 

This course involves writing research papers that study how 
Russia has been perceived and discussed in Europe and America 
from the 18th century through the 20th century. The primary 
source materials for the research projects will involve travel accounts, 
policy discussions, and media coverage of Russia and the Soviet 



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Union. Students will be asked to think about what kinds of con- 
cerns, fears, fascinations, images and stereotypes have influenced 
western perceptions of Russia, and relations with Russia. 
Lawrence Wolff 

HS 300.81 The Study and Writing of History: Witchcraft, Magic 
and Heresy (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: Kay two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094; history 
major status 

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to the prac- 
tice of history through intensive reading and writing about witch- 
craft, magic, and heresy in sixteenth and seventeenth-century 
Europe. Over this two hundred year period thousands of trials were 
conducted in church and secular courts for practices labeled sorcery, 
superstition, and heresy. At the same time hundreds of published 
works on demonology by theologians, lawyers, and rulers portrayed 
in detail the many offenses against God and humanity committed by 
Satan and his human collaborators, the witches. 
Virginia Reinhurg 

HS 300.82 The Study and Writing of History: The United States 
and the Cold War (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 and HS 094; history 
major status 

This course will examine the fifty-year Soviet-American con- 
frontation and its extension from the central arena in Europe to the 
periphery in the Third World. Among other topics, students will dis- 
cuss the shaping influence of World War II, the processes by which 
the U.S. government arrives at foreign policy decisions, the Vietnam 
War and the collapse of America's foreign policy consensus, the 
nuclear balance of terror, and the process of arms control. The course 
gives students the opportunity to design and carry out research pro- 
jects — in consultation with the instructor — on topics relating to the 
American historical experience during the Cold War. 
Seth Jacobs 

HS 300.83 The Study and Writing of History: Oral History and 
the African American Experience (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094; histo- 
ry major status 

In this course students will not only learn about the importance 
and impact of oral histories and traditions in the African American 
experience, but will also devise an oral history project, identifying 
local and statewide resources, researching background information, 
conducting interviews, and creating appropriate forms for present- 
ing interviewees stories. In the process, you will familiarize yourself 
with the varieties of African American oral history — stories, folk- 
tales, testimonies, slave narratives, and even "urban legends" — and 
with the complications of telling someone else's story, particularly 
when that someone is of a different class, race, generation, sex, 
and/or culture. The aim for the course is to train students, through 
readings, discussions and hands-on experience, with the methodolo- 
gy of oral history research in African American history. 
Crystal Feimster 

HS 691 Honors Project and Thesis (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 00 1 through HS 094 

Proposals should be submitted, accompanied by a supporting 
letter from the directing faculty member to the Chairperson of the 
departmental Honors Committee no later than April 1 . All propos- 
als for honors projects must be approved by that committee. 
Completed honors theses are due in April of the senior year. 
The Department 



HS 692 Honors Project (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Proposals should be submitted, accompanied by a supporting 
letter from the directing faculty member to the Chairperson of the 
departmental Honors Committee no later than April 1 . All propos- 
als for honors projects must be approved by that committee. 
Completed honors theses are due in April of the senior year. 
The Department 

HS 695 Advanced Independent Research (Fall: 6) 
Formerly known as Scholar of the College 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Proposals for possible designation as scholar's projects should 
be submitted to the Director of Undergraduate Studies early in the 
spring. Details of dates and required materials are available either 
from the Director's Office or from the office of the Dean of Arts and 
Sciences. All proposals must be approved by the Director and the 
Departmental Honors Committee. 
The Department 

HS 696 Advanced Independent Research (Spring: 3) 
Formerly known as Scholar of the College 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Proposals for possible designation as scholar's projects should 
be submitted to the Director of Undergraduate Studies early in the 
spring. Details of dates and required materials are available either 
from the Director's Office or from the office of the Dean of Arts and 
Sciences. All proposals must be approved by the Director and the 
Departmental Honors Committee. 
The Department 

HS 698 Advanced Independent Research (Spring: 3) 
Formerly known as Scholar of the College 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Students who are enrolled in an approved Advanced 
Independent Research Project (HS 695-696) will carry this course as 
the credit vehicle for the final thesis submitted to the Department in 
completion of that project. This course is open only to students who 
have been designated as candidates for the title of Scholar of the 
College. 
The Department 

HS 699 Readings and Research: Independent Study (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Permission of professor and Director of Undergraduate 
Studies; any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Students who wish to pursue a semester of directed readings 
with individual faculty members under this category must secure the 
permission of the faculty member and the Director of Undergraduate 
Studies. Lists of faculty members and their fields can be obtained 
from the Department. 
The Department 

Undergraduate and Graduate Course Offerings 

HS 303 The Rise of Modern China (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

A survey of Chinese history from the Classical Age to the pre- 
sent with emphasis on ideas and institutions and with attention also 
to social, political and international developments. 
Gray Tuttle 

HS 304 Twentieth Century China (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

The course will first provide an overview of the political, social, 
and intellectual history of China in the twentieth century from 1900 



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to the present; it will then focus on an analysis of crucial issues dur- 
ing the period of the Republic of China from 1912 to 1949, includ- 
ing such topics as Intellectual Revolution, warlordism and political 
unification, Japanese and Western imperialism and its impact on 
China's national disintegration, and the rise of the new ruling elite 
and its role in the process of national integration and modernization. 
The period of the People's Republic since 1950 will also be covered. 
Gray Tuttle 

HS 309 Modern Japan, 1890-2001: Competing Localism, 
Nationalism, Internationalism (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

This course focuses on the emergence of Japan as an interna- 
tional, industrialized, and democratic country from the late 19th 
through the end of the 20th century. We will read about Meiji soci- 
ety as it was imagined and lived, examine ideas and realities of 
Japanese imperialism in Asia, discuss the nature of wartime facism 
compared to ultranational regimes elsewhere, and tackle contradic- 
tions that characterize postwar society — a society that grew out of 
the war experience while conceiving of itself as the war's "obverse." 
Finally, we will assess the changes and challenges in the 1990's in 
relation to Japan's "long postwar." 
Franziska Seraphim 

HS 314 Religion and Politics in 20th Century India (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 
Not open to students who have taken HS 234 

In this course we will explore the factors which gave rise to reli- 
gious animosities in twentieth-century India and the grave conse- 
quences of these animosities. Topics will include British colonial atti- 
tudes to religious differences, the histories of Muslim and Hindu 
political parties, the communal riot as conflict over the public space, 
the partition of the subcontinent into India and Pakistan, gender 
and religious politics, and the revival of Hindu nationalism in post- 
colonial India. 
Prassanan Parthasarathi 

HS 318 Post-Slavery History of the Caribbean (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Cross listed with BK 318 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

This course examines the political, economic and social evolu- 
tion of the Caribbean since slave emancipation. Its emphasis is on 
the development of underdevelopment in the region, and in this 
regard it looks closely at the historical character of the Caribbean's 
incorporation in the international system. Its compass covers the 
Anglophone, Hispanophone, and Francophone Caribbean from 
Haitian independence in 1804 to the present. 
Frank Taylor 

HS 322 Urban Poverty in Latin America (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 and HS 094 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

As the American landscape goes from rural to urban, perhaps 
nothing is as compelling as urban poverty and disorder. This class 
locates the urban poor — formal and informal economy workers, shan- 
ty town dwellers, street children and gangs — ^within the history of the 
city since the 19th century and to the present time. The course focus- 
es on Brazil; it also looks at Mexican and Central American cities. 
Deborah Levenson-Estrada 



HS 325 Revolutionary Cuba: History and Politics (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Cross listed with BK 325 

Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

This course has as its focus Cuba's foreign and domestic poli- 
cies since the revolution. Because Cuba is, in Fidel Castro's words, a 
"Latin African" country, some attention will be focused on the issue 
of race and the revolution in Cuba. Likewise, the history of Cuba's 
policies in Africa and the Caribbean will be looked at closely. It is, 
however, not a traditional course in diplomatic history. It explores 
the interface between domestic and foreign policy throughout, relat- 
ing this to the specific case of Cuba since 1959. 
Frank Taylor 

HS 326 History of Modern Iran (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

This course will provide an analysis of the trends and transfor- 
mations in the political, social and cultural history of Iran from the 
late nineteenth century to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the 
following: structural changes in the Iranian economy and society in 
the latter part of the 19th century; social and religious movements; the 
constitutional revolution of 1905-1911; changing relations between 
Iran and the West; Iran's experience as a modernizing state, 1925- 
1979; cultural roots and the social-structural causes of the Iranian 
Revolution of 1977-79; economic and political developments since 
the revolution; and Iran's current regional and international role. 
Ali Banuazizi 

HS 343 Rise and Fall of the Ottoman Empire (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

The Ottoman Turks founded an empire spanning the three 
continents of the eastern hemisphere and enduring for nearly three- 
quarters of a millennium. Despite nomadic origins they established 
a stable political structure which grafted the high traditions of 
Islamic culture onto an ethnically linguistically and religiously 
diverse society. This course explores the evolution of this remarkable 
enterprise from its origins on the frontiers of Byzantium and Islam, 
through its heyday under Suleyman the Magnificent to its military 
decline and first steps toward reform. 
Benjamin Braude 

HS 347 The Asia-Pacific War (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course explores the centrality of World War II to the his- 
tory of twentieth century East Asia with respect both to the preced- 
ing age of imperialism and colonialism and to the memory of the 
war, which continues to complicate East Asian relations today. The 
term "Asia-Pacific War" explicitly links the conflict between Japan 
and the United States commonly known as the Pacific War (1941- 
45) to Japan's military involvement on the Chinese mainland begin- 
ning in 1 93 1 and considers the cultural and intellectual dimensions 
of the war along with the diplomatic and political ones. 
Franziska Seraphim 

HS 373 Slave Societies in the Caribbean and Latin America (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Cross listed with BK 373 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

Over 90 percent of slaves imported into the Americas during the 
Atlantic slave trade were brought to the Caribbean Islands and South 
America. The Caribbean Islands received 42.2 percent of the total 
slave imports and South America 49.1 percent. Among the topics cov- 



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ered are the rise and fall of slavery, the economics of slave trading, slave 
demography, patterns of slave life, slave laws, slave resistance, slave cul- 
ture, social structure and the roles of the freed people. The compass of 
the course embraces a variety of English, French, Portuguese, Spanish, 
and Dutch speaking countries and a comparative approach. 
Frank Taylor 

HS 376 Latin American Women/Themselves (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

After reading one general history of women and gender in 
Latin America, students will read testimonies by Latin American 
women. We will deal with the problem of the structure women give 
to their own lives in their narratives, as well as with more straight- 
forward issues such as the sexual division of labor, and the nature of 
family and of gender relations in Latin America. The testimonies will 
be used as windows into objective and subjective history and the 
ways in which these two intersect. 
Deborah Levenson-Estrada 

HS 385 Introduction to Modern South Asia (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

This course is a survey of the history of the Indian subcontinent 
from Mughal times to Independence. Topics to be covered will include: 
the decline of the Mughal Empire, the rise of British rule and its 
impact, the Mutiny and Civilian Revolt of 1857, the invention of a tra- 
ditional India in the 19th century, law and gender in British India, 
Gandhi and Indian nationalism, and independence and partition. 
Prasannan Parthasarathi 

HS 430 Revolutionary Britain, 1603-1714 (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Cross listed with EN 494 

This course surveys the history of the British Isles during its 
decisive period, when religious hatreds, social tensions, and political 
crises led to civil war and the first revolution in European history. 
Within the span of a century, revolutions in politics, religion, and 
government transformed England from a second-rate state into one 
of the leading powers of the world, while similarly momentous rev- 
olutions in science, philosophy, and literature brought British 
thought and culture to the forefront of Europe. As a course in British 
history, it takes advantage of a wide variety of primary sources. 
Burke Griggs 

HS 434 History of Northern Ireland, 1912 to the Present (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course will explore in detail the origins of the political cri- 
sis in Northern Ireland. Particular attention will be paid to political, 
economic and social developments in the province. The turbulence 
of the last 28 years and the peace process which has successfully pro- 
duced the landmark "Good Friday Agreement" will be examined. 
The course will consider the challenges that remain for the new 
Northern Ireland Assembly and how that body will function within 
Northern Ireland and work with the British and Irish governments. 
Robert Savage 

HS 435 Ireland Before the Famine (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Not open to students who have taken HS 11 5 

The course will focus on the social and economic determinants 
of Irish political history during the early Penal era, the Age of 
Revolution, the struggle for Catholic Emancipation and the mid cen- 
tury crisis. Themes explored will include economic development, 
sectarianism, republicanism, colonialism, and women's studies. 
Kevin O'Neill 



HS 436 Twentieth Century Ireland (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course will explore the political, cultural and social histo- 
ry of Ireland in the twentieth century. Topics covered will include 
the Gaelic and literary revival, women's suffrage, the struggle for 
independence, civil war and the partition of the island. We will also 
examine economic development on both sides of the border and 
look at the civil unrest that has plagued Northern Ireland over the 
past thirty years. Particular attention will be devoted to the unfold- 
ing peace process and the role played by British, Irish and American 
leaders in trying to find a solution to "The Troubles." 
Thomas Hachey 

HS 444 The End of History? (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

The end of the Cold War and the coming of the millennium have 
sparked a wide-ranging discussion about the direction and meaning of 
recent historical changes. This course will take a critical look at some of 
the more thoughtful and compelling arguments along these lines and 
provide students with an opportunity to write essays evaluating and cri- 
tiquing these alternative visions of the recent past and the near future. 
James Cronin 

HS 454 Twentieth Century Russia (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Whither Russia? What does the future hold in store for the 
world's largest nation, which has long surprised, horrified and aston- 
ished outside observers? We will explore the stormy course of 20th 
Century Russian History from Tsar Nicholas II to the present day. 
Topics covered include the revolutionary movement, the 1905 and 
1917 Revolutions, the Civil War, the power struggle, Stalinism, indus- 
trialization, collectivization, political terror. World War II, the Cold 
War, de-Stalinization, Stagnation, Perestroika, the Fall of Communism 
and dissolution of the USSR, and the great Russian Depression. 
Roberta Manning 

HS 456 Russia and the Cold War (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Soviet foreign policy and military history, with special empha- 
sis on the period after World War II. We will study the foreign pol- 
icy of successive Russian leaders from Lenin to Putin. Topics covered 
include the Russian Revolution, the two World Wars, the interwar 
period, the Cold War crises from Berlin through Cuba, the nuclear 
arms race, espionage, the transfer of superpower rivalries from 
Europe to the Third World, the Sino-Soviet split. Detente, Vietnam, 
Afghanistan, the New Cold War, the fall of Communism and disin- 
tegration of the USSR, Chechnia, the Second Afghan War, and the 
emergence of a new world order. 
Roberta Manning 

HS 466 Europe 1871-1914 (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course will explore the development of Europe from the 
end of the Franco- Prussian War to the outbreak of World War I. 
Particular emphasis will be given to the following themes: the polit- 
ical and diplomatic developments that first gave Europe one of its 
longest periods of peace, and then plunged it into its most disastrous 
war; the political progress that led to the apparent triumph of liber- 
alism and democracy in most of Europe by 1914; the economic and 
technological progress that gave Europe unprecedented prosperity, 
and the rise of European domination of the world. 
Alan Reinerman 



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HS 468 European Intellectual History, 1492-1789 (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Four great revolutions took place between 1600 and 1800. Two 
of them were political revolutions: the English Revolution of the 
1640's, and the French Revolution of the 1790's. Yet both of these 
were fundamentally connected to revolutions in knowledge: the scien- 
tific revolution of the seventeenth century, and the eighteenth-centu- 
ry Enlightenment. This course surveys the these revolutions in power 
and in knowledge, and surveys the relationships among them, through 
study of some of the period's principal texts in intellectual history. 
Burke Griggs 

HS 469 Intellectual History of Modern Europe I (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course will focus on the 19th century (1789-1914), devot- 
ing main but not exclusive attention to the thinking and impacts of 
four, dead, white, straight, European males: Hegel, Marx, Nietzsche, 
and Freud. It will take seriously the terms just mentioned — death, 
whiteness, heterosexuality, masculinity and Europe — in examining 
the stories these major thinkers tell about the world and themselves. 
Paul Breines 

HS 470 Intellectual History of Modern Europe II (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course is a continuation of HS 469 
Paul Breines 

HS 477 Modern Italy (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course will explore the development of Italy from 1815 to 
the present, explaining how during these years Italy was transformed 
from a politically divided, culturally stagnant, and economically 
backward land to the united, prosperous, and democratic, if trou- 
bled, nation it is today. 
Alan Reinerman 

HS 478 Italian Renaissance Adolescents (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Cross Listed with RL 336 

See course description in the Romance Languages and 
Literatures Department. 
Laurie Shepard 

HS 479 Rome and the Vatican (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Not open to students who have taken HS 232 

This course focuses on Rome and Vatican history during the 
early modern period. That is. Renaissance and Baroque Rome. The 
course combines aspects of urban history, religious history, and the 
history of art and architecture. It examines the Roman careers of 
such artists and architects as Bramante, Raphael, Michelangelo, 
Caravaggio, Bernini, and Borromini. It considers the evolving rela- 
tions between the Vatican and Rome, between the papacy itself and 
the papal city, addressing the question of what is specifically Roman 
about Roman Catholicism in early modern Europe. 
Lawrence Wolff 

HS 488 The French Revolution (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

A social and political history of France during the turbulent 
decade, 1789-1799. The course will consider the origins of the 
Revolution, the reconstruction of France by the National Assembly, 
the failure to regain stability in 1791-92, the rise of the radical 
Jacobins and the sans-culottes, the Reign of Terror, the 
Thermidorian Reaction, the winding down of the Revolution, and 
the rise of Napoleon Bonaparte. 
Paul Spagnoli 



HS 492 Europe Since 1945 (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course, team taught by a German and French historian of 
modern Europe, traces the dramatic transformation of the continent 
from the chaos of the "year Zero" in 1945 to the euphoria of the 
introduction of a common European currency in a commercial union 
which is larger than the United States. Individual topics will include 
the reconstruction of the economy following the war, the develop- 
ment of the Cold War, the crises of decolonization, the division and 
subsequent reunion of eastern and western Europe, and the on-going 
issues of migration and the search for a common European culture. 
John L. Heineman 
Francis J. Murphy 

HS 505 The History of New York City, 1776 to the Present 
(Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

New York City has long occupied a unique place in the 
American imagination. For some the city has been Utopia, symbol- 
izing the nation's democratic promise. Others have looked to New 
York and seen, instead, an urban dystopia teeming with crime and 
corruption. This course will consider the city's history from the 
American Revolution to its contemporary resurgence, paying atten- 
tion to the following: immigrants and their cultures; the Civil War 
draft riots; Coney Island and the rise of urban mass culture; the 
Harlem Renaissance; outerborough conservatism in the 1970s. We 
will make use of novels, memoirs, films, and other historical sources. 
David Quigley 

HS 510 Text and Context: Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man and the 
Black Modern Experience (Fall: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

An interdisciplinary approach will be used to examine the his- 
torical, social, and cultural contexts for Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man. 
Specifically, bringing historical and cultural analysis to bear on a sin- 
gle work of fiction, this course will survey key themes in African 
American life from 1899 to 1950 including migration, urbanization, 
the black modern aesthetic, black radicalism and black nationalism. 
With W.E.B. DuBois' concept of "double consciousness" in mind, 
the course explores how the black subject is in many ways both out- 
side of yet central to the modern experience. 
Davarian Baldwin 

HS 514 The American Civil War and Reconstruction (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course will study the Civil War and the Age of 
Reconstruction, paying special attention to the transformation of 
American politics in the second half of the nineteenth century. We 
will examine the conflict between North and South from a number 
of perspectives; military, social, and cultural. In addition, the course 
will consider the struggles of Reconstruction and the legacies of 
emancipation. 
David Quigley 

HS 518 U.S. Constitutional History (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Alan Rogers 

HS 552 U. S. Since 1945 (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course will explore the significant political, economic, and 
social developments in the United States since the end of World War 
II. Although the focus will be on domestic affairs; foreign policy will 
also be discussed to the extent that it affected internal events. Among 
the topics to be examined are post-war prosperity, the Red Scare, the 



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struggle for racial and sexual equality, student protests in the 1960s, 

the problems of the modern presidency, and the contemporary crisis 

in the American economy. 

Mark Gelfand 

HS 554 Race, Gender, and Sexuality in the South (Spring: 3) 

Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Exploration of the changing patterns of manhood and woman- 
hood in the southern regions of the United States from the colonial 
period through the twentieth century, with emphasis on race and 
gender politics. Topics include slavery, labor, race, class relations, 
family life, sexuality, and violence. 
Crystal Feimster 

HS 558 American Irish (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094. 
Not open to students who have taken HS 286 

Between 1700 and 1855, 3.5 million Irish people crossed the 
Atlantic to settle in North America. This vast movement was of great 
historical significance on both sides of the Atlantic: it played a fun- 
damental role in the shaping of modern Ireland, and it determined 
the economic, political and cultural development of the United 
States at this time. The course will examine the history of this migra- 
tion in terms of the social, economic, political, and cultural history 
of the Irish in both Ireland and the United States, with a focus on 
continuity and change in a transatlantic setting. 
Kevin Kenny 

HS 560 American Environment (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 
Not open to students who have taken HS 259 

The study of America's physical being from colonial settling to 
the present, examining the changes made ecologically to our pub- 
lic/private land and water America imagined itself as bountiful and 
limitless in resources. Over time, reality has set in to show a nation 
ecologically in turmoil. Areas and issues studied include clearing the 
land, the impact of urbanization and suburbanization, transporta- 
tion, American manufacturing from giant to rust belt, environmen- 
tal protectors (e.g., Rachel Carson, John Muir), preserving national 
sites, and environmental racism. 
Andrew Bunie 

HS 564 Coin' to Chicago: The Great Migration and Urban 
Culture in the Black Metropolis (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Ctdtural Diversity Core Requirement 
Prerequisite: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course examines the social and cultural history of 
Chicago's black urban community. By focusing on the early to mid 
twentieth century, this course highlights a period of cultural contact 
and transformation marked by the Great Migration, industrializa- 
tion and a commercialization of culture in urban centers. More gen- 
erally, the aims of this course are to examine how migration and the 
shifting notions of race, class and gender shaped life in urban places. 
Furthermore, urban identity formations will be explored through 
musical forms, visual images, literary styles, and the leisure activities 
of everyday culture. 
Davarian Baldwin 
HS 567 History of Sports in America (Spring: 3) 

A look at recreation, leisure, and sports as a way of life in 
America, and as an integral part of the total society. Ranging from 
urban immigrant settlement house basketball in the early 1900's to 
present-day Holy War — BC-Notre Dame football — emphasis is 



placed on class structure in athletics, the issue of race, monetary 

upward mobility, sports and the city, the nation's love affair with 

heroes, and more recently with heroines, as well as gender issues. 

Andrew Bunie 

HS 570 Social Action in Urban America (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: hxij two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course examines the history of social action in the United 
States from the 1 890s to the present. Looking at the grassroots level, we 
will do case studies of several liberal and radical social movements 
including Populism, the settlement house movement, the labor move- 
ment, the civU rights movement of the 1960s, and the community orga- 
nizing movement of the 1 970s. In addition to the class, there is com- 
munity service component that may be fulfilled through participation 
in PULSE or other volunteer programs in the Boston area. Students will 
investigate the history of their own community organization. 
Marilynn Johnson 

HS 571 U.S. Foreign Relations I (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course is the first half of a two semester survey of the history 
of U.S. foreign relations from the Revolutionary War through the pre- 
sent day. Students will examine conflicting interpretations of America's 
role in the world and trace how that role has changed as the nation grew 
from thirteen isolated, parochial communities on the Atlantic coast to 
the greatest military, and economic superpower in history. Important 
topics include the territorial expansion of the American "empire," the 
development of and debate over, constitutional powers, and the strug- 
gle for American markets in Asia and elsewhere. 
Seth Jacobs 

HS 572 U.S. Foreign Relations II (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

The continuation of HS 571. 
Seth Jacobs 

HS 606 Racial Violence in American History (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Examination of the role of violence in shaping the political, 
social and economic experiences of various racial groups in the 
United States. Emphasis on the racial, religious, and ethnic violence 
against Native Americans, European emigrants, African Americans, 
Chicanos, and Asian Americans. Topics include: "trail of tears," slav- 
ery, manifest destiny. Reconstruction, lynching, Japanese internment 
camps, prostitution, the gold rush, and the civil rights movement. 
Crystal Feimster 

HS 654 Irish Women Emigrants: The Irish and American 
Context (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

An outstanding characteristic of emigration from Ireland to 
North America was the large number of women in the emigration 
stream. This seminar course will be an examination of Irish women 
and emigration beginning with study of conditions in Ireland that 
resulted in women leaving in such large numbers. Following that 
will be an examination of their experience as immigrants in North 
America. Emphasis in the course will be on the use of research tools 
in historical work on Irish women, utilizing primary source materi- 
als such as estate papers, the letters women wrote home, and data- 
base characteristics of Irish women in America. 
Ruth-Ann Harris 

HS 668 American Immigration and Ethnicity (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

This course will examine the history of American immigration 
and ethnicity from the colonial era, through the "old" immigration 
of 1820-80 and the "new" immigration of 1880-1920, to the "third 



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wave" of immigration from 1965 onward. The course will pay par- 
ticular attention to the following topics: the causes of emigration in 
the "home" countries; patterns of immigration and settlement; con- 
cepts of ethnic identity; labor, race, and gender; government policy 
and ethnic organization and mobilization. The course will examine 
the history of all major groups, with special attention to Irish, 
Mexican and Asian immigration. 
Kevin Kenny 

HS 669 Eire/Land: Culture, Politics and Irish Landscape (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: Any two semesters of HS 001 through HS 094 

Eire/Land charts the cultural responses to the land in Celtic 
times, and from the late 18th to the 20th centuries. We will trace 
the history and development of Irish landscape painting and read 
key works of literature. The McMullen Museum exhibition and its 
lecture series will be incorporated into the course. 
Robert Savage 

Graduate Course Offerings 
Graduate Colloquia 

A colloquium consists of readings, primarily in secondary 
sources, on a series of selected topics. All graduate students are urged 
to take at least one colloquium each semester. 
HS 804 Colloquium: Methods in Cultural History: Mass Culture 
and Consumerism (Spring: 3) 

This reading intensive seminar is designed to guide students 
through some of the major theories of mass culture and con- 
sumerism and, most importantly, the application of these theories 
within studies of cultural history. We will cover overlapping debates 
with "Frankfurt School" critical theory, cultural studies, ethnic stud- 
ies, anthropology, literature, etc. and their relationship to current 
developments in the field of cultural history. Though the course will 
focus on the 20th century U.S., texts that deal with earlier historical 
moments and alternative locations will also be considered. 
Davarian Baldwin 
HS 848 Colloquium: Topics in Intellectual History (Fall: 3) 

The colloquium examines the writings of the late George L. 
Mosse, who worked in numerous fields and sub-fields in European 
history: Reformation history; cultural history; contemporary histo- 
ry; modern Germany; nationalism. Fascism, and Nazism; the Great 
War; gender and gay history; and Jewish history. Along with com- 
mon Mosse readings, participants will select a field or sub-field and 
a book by Mosse, focusing on it through the course, situating it in 
the broader historiography of the field or sub-field, and delineating 
their own approach to history. 
Paul Breines 
HS 871 Colloquium: U.S. to 1877 (Spring: 3) 

This course is designed to familiarize students with critical 
issues and interpretations in the field of American history up to 
Reconstruction. 
Lynn Lyerly 
HS 872 Colloquium: U.S. Since 1860 (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course is designed to familiarize students with critical 
issues and interpretations in the field of American History since 
Reconstruction. We will pay particular attention to the relationship 
between recent developments in historiography and traditional 
approaches to modern American history. 
Marilynn Johnson 

HS 885 Colloquium: The Irish Migration to North America 
(Fall: 3) 

This colloquium will introduce graduate students to the com- 
plexity of the Irish-American past. More than seven million Irish peo- 



ple have crossed the Atlantic for North America since 1700. Taking a 
transatlantic perspective, the seminar will examine in-depth the con- 
ditions that led to mass migration from Ireland, the process of migra- 
tion, and the principal themes in the history of the American Irish, 
including labor, race, gender, religion, politics, and nationalism. 
Kevin Kenny 

HS 893 Colloquium: Comparative Social Movements (Spring: 3) 
Deborah Levenson-Estrada 

HS 896 Core Colloquium: Early Modern Etu-opean History (Fall: 3) 
Required for all incoming Ph.D. students 

This course will serve as intellectual preparation for teaching 
the first half of the history department's Core course in modern his- 
tory, which covers roughly the period from the late middle ages 
through the French Revolution. Equally important, however, the 
course will also serve more broadly as preparation for advanced study 
in history. The course is organized topically rather than chronologi- 
cally, and readings have been chosen both because they treat an 
important topic in the period but also because of their significance 
for historical interpretation and practice today. 
Lawrence Wolff 

HS 897 Core Colloquium: Modern European History II (Spring: 3) 
Required for all incoming Ph.D. students 

This colloquium will serve as a broad introduction to major 
themes, controversies, and historiographic developments in modern 
European history. The focus will be largely upon social and eco- 
nomic history. 
Peter Weiler 
Graduate Seminars 
HS 921 Seminar: Medieval European History (Fall: 3) 

Students in this seminar will write original research papers on 
some topic in medieval social, economic or political history. The 
topic will be one upon which the student and professor have agreed, 
and will be based primarily on original sources. Students will not 
only be required to write a paper, but to read and critique all papers 
written in the seminar. The final paper will be a polished and rewrit- 
ten piece incorporating the critiques of the professor and other grad- 
uate students in the seminar. 
Robin Fleming 
HS 937 Seminar: Modern European History (Fall: 3) 

This course is designed to provide a structured setting within 
which students of Modern European history can conceive and exe- 
cute major research papers. The classes will focus primarily on his- 
toriography. Students will be free to select topics dealing with any 
aspect of modern European history and they will be encouraged to 
work in whatever national or regional setting they prefer and for 
which they have command of the language. Students will be expect- 
ed to present a completed paper to the class for discussion. 
James Cronin 

HS 944 Seminar: Ideology, Poetry and Politics: Jacobite Ireland 
(Spring: 3) 
Brendan O'Buachalla 

HS 971 Seminar: 19th Century U.S. History (Fall: 3) 
Alan Rogers 

HS 978 Seminar: 20th Century U.S. (Spring: 3) 
Carol Petillo 

HS 979 Seminar: Politics and Culture in American History 
(Spring: 3) 
David Quigley 



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HS 992 Seminar: Dissertation Seminar (Spring: 3) 

The aim of this course is to bring together students beginning 
dissertations in various fields to discuss the substance of their 
research and problems of theory, method, and organization. 
Students will be expected to report on their dissertation proposal 
and to present, by the end of the semester, a section of the disserta- 
tion itself 

Prasannan Parthasarathi 
Graduate Independent Study 
HS 799 Readings and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
The Department 
HS 801 Thesis Seminar (Fall: 6) 

By arrangement. 
The Department 

HS 888 Interim Study (FaU/Spring: 0) 
The Department 

HS 899 Interim Study (FaU/Spring: 0) 
The Department 
HS 997 Dissertation Workshop (Fall/Spring: 0) 

All history graduate students, except non-resident students, 
who have finished their comprehensive examinations are required to 
enroll in the Dissertation Workshop. 
The Department 

HS 998 Doctoral Comprehensives (Fall/Spring: 0) 
The Department 

HS 999 Doctoral Continuation (Fall/Spring: 0) 
The Department 

The Honors Program 

Departmental Notes 

• Director of the Honors Program: Dr. Mark O'Connor, 
617-552-3315, oconnoma@bc.edu 

• Administrative Secretary: Pat Dolan, 617-552-3315, 
patricia.dolan@bc.edu 

World Wide Web: http://www.bc.edu:80/bc_org/ 
avp/cas/ashp/ 

The Structure of the Honors Program 

All Boston College undergraduates are required to do an exten- 
sive Core curriculum in the humanities and the natural and social 
sciences. The Honors Program provides students with the opportu- 
nity to complete most of this Core in a four-year sequence of cours- 
es and academic challenges that provides an integrated liberal arts 
education of a kind one can find in few colleges or universities. On 
this solid foundation a student can then build a major concentration 
in one or more specialized disciplines, or add one of the interdisci- 
plinary minors available to all students in the College. 

The program offers small classes (no larger than 1 5 students) , 
the give and take of seminar discussion, the close personal attention 
of instructors, and the companionship of bright and eager classmates 
on the journey through the history of ideas. It also offers students a 
set of challenges matched to each level of their development: in first 
and second years an overview of the whole Western cultural tradi- 
tion, in third year a course focused on the twentieth century's rein- 
terpretation of the tradition, and in their final year the chance to 
bring together what they have learned in a thesis or creative project 
or in an integrative seminar. 

The Honors Program office is located in a suite of rooms in 
Gasson Hall, the oldest of the buildings on the campus, designed in 
the early years of this century by the noted architect of the Gothic 
Revival style, Charles Donagh Maginnis. It includes a seminar room 



and a large library — the original library of the College — which is at 

the disposal of Honors Program students for study and also serves as 

the setting for lectures, concerts and social gatherings for faculty and 

students. 

Freshman and Sophomore Year 

In their first two years, students take a course called The 
Western Cultural Tradition. This is a four-semester, six-credit 
course, equal to two of the five courses B.C. students take each 
semester. It is taught in seminar fashion. The course content reflects 
the fact that the course fulfills the Core requirements in literature 
and writing, philosophy, theology, and social science. Though indi- 
vidual instructors vary their reading lists, there is broad agreement 
about the central texts. The first year deals with the classical tradi- 
tion. It begins with Greek literature and philosophy, Latin literature, 
the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament, and continues through 
representative texts of the late Roman Empire and early Christianity, 
Thomas Aquinas, Dante, and mediaeval epic and romantic poetry 
and drama. The second year begins with Renaissance authors, con- 
tinues with the religious and political theorists of the seventeenth 
century, the principal Enlightenment figures, the English and conti- 
nental Romantics, major nineteenth-century writers such as Hegel 
and Kierkegaard and Dostoevsky and Nietzsche, and ends with the 
seminal cultural theories of Darwin and Marx and Freud. 

This course is not a survey of the history of ideas taught out of 
anthologies. It is rigorously text-centered and the function of class 
discussion and the frequent writing assignments is to teach students 
to understand and dissect arguments and presuppositions and to 
relate disparate evidence into coherent hypotheses about the works 
that have been central in the development of our contemporary 
intellectual tradition. 
Junior Year 

In junior year, students take an advanced seminar called The 
Twentieth Century and the Tradition. This two-semester course 
(three credits each semester) draws on literature, visual art, science, 
philosophy, religion, political theory, historical events such as the 
Holocaust, and developments such as the globalization of the econ- 
omy and of information technology, in order to examine how the 
twentieth century has absorbed, criticized or reinterpreted the cul- 
tural tradition it inherited. Students are challenged to understand 
the interplay between the tradition and some of the significant crit- 
ical currents in the intellectual culture of our century, for example, 
Marxism, psychoanalysis, comparative anthropology, structuralism 
and post-structuralism, feminism, and the third-world critique of 
Eurocentric culture. The aim of the course is to complete the work 
begun in freshman and sophomore years, to equip students with a 
critical understanding of contemporary culture that will enable them 
to live thoughtfully and responsibly. If they study abroad in their 
junior year they will normally take this course in senior year. 
Senior Year 

In their final year, students may choose either of two ways of 
finishing their work in the Program. They may write a senior the- 
sis, which is ordinarily a six-credit enterprise, spread over two semes- 
ters. This may be an extended research or analytic paper, or it may 
be a creative project involving performance in some medium. 
Students have written on topics as diverse as key words in the 
Russian text of Dostoevsky, the political organization of the 
European Community, a Massachusetts state senate campaign, the 
influence of alcoholic fathers on their sons, superconductivity, and 
the experience of open heart surgery. They have participated in orig- 
inal cancer research, and produced novels, dramas, operas, and elec- 
tronic performance pieces. Most students do a thesis in the area of 



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their major, under the direction of an advisor from their major 
department, but many hke the challenge of working outside their 
own particular disciplines. 

Students may choose, instead, to take part in an integrative 
seminar where they will re-read certain key texts that they may have 
studied years earlier (Plato's Republic, for example) as a way of com- 
ing to understand their own experience of college education. The 
aim is to encourage them as seniors to rise above the specialized 
viewpoint of their majors in order to grasp the interconnections 
among contemporary ways of thinking and the principles of value 
and behavior that have been guiding their development implicitly 
during their college years. 
Honors Program Completion 

Students will receive Honors Program designation in the 
Commencement program and on their academic records if they have 
completed the freshman, sophomore, and junior courses, either a 
senior thesis and/or one of the senior integrative seminars, and have 
maintained a minimum 3.33 GPA. 
Information for Study Abroad 

The Honors Program encourages students to study abroad, 
especially through their studies to work on language acquisition. 
Depending on the student's situation, the Honors Program is will- 
ing to defer the junior year "20th Century and Tradition" sequence 
to senior year, and in certain cases (a full year abroad, and a senior 
thesis in the offing, with still important requirements left in the 
major) it is willing to drop that requirement altogether. A student 
needs to petition, and the Honors Program will build its answer into 
the mentoring role they offer HP students in fashioning their four- 
year curriculum. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
HP 001 Western Cultural Tradition I (Fall: 3) 
Corequisite: HP 002 

All students in the Honors Program are required to take 
Western Cultural Tradition I-IV (HP 001 -HP 004) as freshmen and 
Western Cultural Tradition V-VIII (HP 031 -HP 034) as sopho- 
mores. These are two 3-credit courses each semester (a total of 24 
credits), and they substitute for the normal Core requirements in 
Theology, Philosophy, English and (for non-majors) Social Science. 
They are open only to students in A&S (about nine percent of the 
freshmen class) who have been selected by the Director in collabora- 
tion with the Office of Undergraduate Admission. All have been con- 
tacted by letter during the summer with instructions on registration. 
The Department 

HP 002 Western Cultural Tradition II (Fall: 3) 
Corequisite: HP 001 

See course description under HP 001. 
The Department 

HP 003 Western Cultural Tradition III (Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HP 004 

All students in the Honors Program are required to take 
Western Cultural Tradition I-IV (HP 001 -HP 004) as freshmen and 
Western Cultural Tradition V-VIII (HP 031 -HP 034) as sopho- 
mores. These are two 3-credit courses each semester (a total of 24 
credits), and they substitute for the normal Core requirements in 
Theology, Philosophy, English and (for non-majors) Social Science. 
They are open only to students in A&S (about nine percent of the 



freshmen class) who have been selected by the Director in collabora- 
tion with the Office of Undergraduate Admission. All have been con- 
tacted by letter during the summer with instructions on registration. 
The Department 

HP 004 Western Cultural Tradition IV (Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HP 003 

See course description under HP 001. 
The Department 

HP 031 Western Cultural Tradition V (Fall: 3) 
Corequisite: HP 032 

See course description under HP 001. 
The Department 

HP 032 Western Cultural Tradition VI (Fall: 3) 
Corequisite: HP 031 

See course description under HP 001. 
The Department 

HP 033 Western Cultural Tradition VII (Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HP 034 

See course description under HP 001. 
The Department 

HP 034 Western Cultural Tradition VIII (Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: HP 033 

See course description under HP 001. 
The Department 
HP 133 Twentieth Century and the Tradition I (Fall: 3) 

This is a continuation of the Western Cultural Tradition course 
into the 20th century, and it is required of all Honors Program 
Juniors. The course describes what happened to the tradition in the 
20th century, how it got criticized and rethought, and how it 
absorbed new forms of knowledge and new points of view. The first 
semester deals with the period up to World War II and focuses on 
both the excitement engendered by the cultural movement called 
Modernism and the darker forces that accompanied it. 
Martin Cohen 
Christopher Constas 
Mary Joe Hughes 
Michael Martin 
Susan Mattis 
John Michalczyk 
Vanessa Rumble 
HP 134 Twentieth Century and the Tradition II (Spring: 3) 

The second semester of this course deals with the key cultural 
issues of the latter half of the century, especially those grouped under 
the heading of Postmodernity. Here the focus will be on the funda- 
mental critique of the tradition posed by post-structuralist cultural the- 
ories, feminism, deconstructionism, the communications revolution, 
changing views of non- Western cultures, and new perspectives center- 
ing on race, ethnicity, and gender. The crucial question to be addressed 
is whether, and on what terms, it is possible to construct a reliable iden- 
tity and an adequate basis for moral choice and political action. 
Martin Cohen 
Christopher Constas 
Mary Joe Hughes 
Michael Martin 
Susan Mattis 
Kevin Newmark 
Vanessa Rumble 

HP 199 Readings and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
The Department 



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HP 252 Senior Seminar: Odysseus to Ulysses (Spring: 3) 
Timothy Duket 

HP 253 Senior Seminar: Literature and Medicine: The Human 
Experience (Fall: 3) 

This course examines ethical, social, moral, and psychological 
issues in the areas of science and medicine as expressed through var- 
ious literary genres, e.g., novels, plays and poems. Literary master- 
pieces are employed as a springboard for discussion of various scien- 
tific and human issues as they relate to disease, death, suffering, and 
healing. Topics covered include the evil doctor, the quack, human 
and animal disease as metaphor, birth and death, mental illness, and 
the physician as artist. 
David Hatem, M.D. 

HP 254 Senior Seminar: Law, Medicine, and Public Policy 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 
Formerly HP 129 

This course is an analysis of legal and ethical issues in medicine. 
It is designed so that students take an ethical position on difficult or 
emerging issues in medicine such as appropriate care of seriously ill 
newborns, new forms on reproduction on proposals for health care 
reform. The student is expected to provide a principled rationale for 
the position. That rationale is then subject to analysis and critique 
by other members of the class. 
John J. Paris, S.J. 

HP 258 Language of Liturgy (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with TH 198 and SL 221 

See course description in the Slavic and Eastern Languages 
Department. 
Michael Connolly 

HP 259 Hitler, Churches and Holocaust (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with TH 482 

See course description in the Theology Department. 
Donald Dietrich 

HP 299 Senior Honors Thesis (Fall/Spring: 3) 
The Department 

HP 399 Advanced Independent Research (Fall/Spring: 6) 
Formerly known as Scholar of the College 
The Department 

International Studies 

Departmental Notes 

Director: David Deese, McGuinn 217, 617-552-4585, 
deese@bc.edu 

• Academic Advisor/Program Administrator: Linda Gray 
MacKay Hovey House 108, 617-552-0740, 
mackayli@bc.edu 

• World Wide Web: http://www.bc.edu/isp 

Undergraduate Program Description 

The interdisciplinary major in International Studies includes 
professors from several key departments, prepares students to 
become effective citizens in an increasingly interdependent interna- 
tional environment. The major focuses on cultural, political, and 
economic relations among states, intergovernmental organizations, 
non-governmental organizations, multinational corporations and 
social movements. The program strongly encourages foreign study 
and advanced study of a foreign language. 

Applying for the International Studies Major 

Students are accepted into the International Studies Major by 
application only. Approximately 20 students will be accepted into 
the major each year, after they have completed one year of study at 
Boston College. Admission is determined by the Academic Board of 



the International Studies program that includes faculty from the 
departments of Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Theology, 
Economics, History and Romance Languages and the Associate 
Dean of Arts and Sciences. Criteria for admission includes: academ- 
ic achievement (overall GPA, rigor of a student's academic program, 
and other noteworthy aspects of academic performance), strength of 
a faculty member's letter of recommendation, demonstrated person- 
al and intellectual commitment to the field, quality of student's per- 
sonal intellectual statement for admission, and foreign language pro- 
ficiency. Applications must be submitted by October 15. 
Applications are available at http://www.bc.edu/isp. 
Major Requirements 

International Studies Core: 7 courses 

PO 500 Introduction to International Studies 

EC 131 Principles of Microeconomics 

EC 132 Principles of Macroeconomics 

A Comparative Politics course 

TH 863 Ethics, Religion & International Politics 

History, Culture & Society (2 courses from an approved list) 

Disciplinary Base: 6 courses 

Either in Economics or Political Science 

• Economics: 

EC 201 Microeconomic Theory or preferably EC 203 
EC 202 Macroeconomic Theory or preferably EC 204 
EC 151 Statistics or preferably EC 157 
EC 228 Econometrics or EC 308 Game Theory in Economics 
2 electives chosen from: 

EC 271 International Economic Relations 

EC 276 Political Economy of Developing Nations 

EC 371 International Trade 

EC 372 International Finance 

EC 373 Economics of Latin America 

EC 375 Economic Development 

• Political Science: PO 041-042 Fundamentals I & II 

• Methods Course 

• 3 electives from an approved list 

Senior Year Research and Writing Project: 2-semester 
requirement 

Fall: senior seminar, research paper (TH 550, SC 500) 

Spring: senior thesis, faculty-undergraduate research project, 

or research/writing/internship 
Minor Requirements 

The interdisciplinary minor is a carefully structured six-course 
plan of study which includes two required foundational courses and 
four elective courses chosen on the basis of a thematic area of study 
and a region chosen by the student. 

Foundational Courses 

• PO 500 Introduction to International Studies 

• A comparative course — choose one: 

EC 276 Political Economy of Developing Nations 
(Prerequisites: EC 131 & 132 Principles of Economics 
Micro & Macro) 
TH 162 Religious Quest 
PO 400 Introduction to Comparative Politics 
SC 093 Comparative Social Change 
Thematic Areas of Study — choose one: 

• Development Studies 

• International Political Economy 

• Causes of War and Peace 

• Ethics of International Relations 
Geographic Regions — choose one: 

• Africa 



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China and Asia 

Latin America and the Caribbean 

Middle East 

Russia and East Central Europe 

Western Europe 
Senior Seminar 

All International Studies minors must take a Senior Seminar 
(TH 550, SC 500) and write a senior paper based on an interna- 
tional theme. The senior seminar can be counted toward meeting a 
student's thematic or regional elective requirements. 
Information for First Year Students 

Freshmen who are considering applying to become 
International Studies majors in their sophomore year should consid- 
er taking the following courses to fulfill their social science universi- 
ty core requirements: 

• EC 131 Principles of Microeconomics 

• EC 132 Principles of Macroeconomics 

Although the following courses are not required, they provide 
excellent background for the major in International Studies: 
TH 161-162 The Religious Quest I and II to fulfill their 
Theology Core requirement 

• HS 055-056 Modern History I and II: Globalization to ful- 
fill their History Core requirement 

Information for Study Abroad 

Many International Studies majors benefit from studying 
abroad. Students can transfer credit for two courses taken in each 
semester that they spend studying abroad. 

Any students who is contemplating doing a senior honors the- 
sis who plans to be abroad during the spring of their junior year 
when the normal application process for an honors thesis occurs, is 
strongly urged to plan ahead. They should try to establish their the- 
sis topic and identify a faculty member who is willing to supervise 
their work with whom they can keep in contact by e-mail while they 
are abroad before they leave Boston College. 

For more information, contact Linda Gray MacKay, 
International Studies Program Administrator at mackayli@bc.edu or 
617-552-0740. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
IN 500 Introduction to International Studies (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with PO 500 

This course is open to undergraduate students who have not yet 
taken PO 501 or PO 507. 

This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to inter- 
national studies. It is designed especially for students who intend to 
pursue further courses in the field and assumes no prior coursework 
in related disciplines. The course lays the groundwork for under- 
standing the ways in which international influences shape the world's 
economies, polities, societies, and cultures, and the consequences for 
global conflict or cooperation. The course explores how such ques- 
tions may be answered more comprehensively through an interdisci- 
plinary approach that draws from the social sciences and humanities. 
Donald Hafner 

IN 504 Seminar: Ethics in International Studies (Fall: 3) 
Cross listed with TH 504 

Open to Seniors in International Studies and others with the per- 
mission of the instructor 

The Seminar in International Studies will examine the evolu- 
tion of individual and group rights throughout the history of mod- 



ern international relations, but with special attention to the post- 
World War II period. The unifying question is how individuals and 
groups obtain fundamental civil, political, social and economic 
rights not only within the states but also across them. 
Donald J. Dietrich 

IN 550 International Studies Seminar (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with SC 500 

Designed primarily for graduating seniors who are completing 
thesis requirements for the International Studies Major or Minor. 
The seminar will be interdisciplinary in focus. Seniors in 
International Studies are welcome regardless of their specialty or 
field of interest, although the main analytical concepts will be drawn 
from the social sciences. Initially, we shall be concerned with broad, 
common themes in contemporary International Studies, including: 
the "new world order," democratization, terrorism, technology and 
social change, trade and dependency, the clash of cultures, etc. 
Paul S. Gray 

IN 600 Ethics, Religion and International Politics (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with TH 563 

See Theology Department for registration approval. Preference to 
Theology and International Studies majors and minors. 

An examination of the role of religion in international politics 
and of ethical approaches to international affairs. Special emphasis 
will be given to religion as a source of conflict, religious communi- 
ties as transnational agents for justice, protection of human rights, 
and peace; the historical development and contemporary formula- 
tions of ethical norms for the use of force, ethical and religious con- 
tributions to reconciliation and solidarity. 
David Hollenbach, S.J. 

Mathematics 

Faculty 

Gerald G. Bilodeau, Professor Emeritus and Director of the 

Mathematics Institute; A.B., University of Maine; A.M., Ph.D., 

Harvard University 

Stanley J. Bezuszka, S.J., Professor Emeritus; A.B., A.M., M.S., 

Boston College; S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., Brown University 

Joseph Sullivan, Professor Emeritus; A.B., Boston College; M.S., 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Indiana University 

John F. Caulfield, S.J., Assistant Professor Emeritus; A.B., A.M., 

Boston College; S.T.L., Weston College 

Joseph F. ^&s^s, Assistant Professor Emeritus; K^ ., A.M., Boston 

College 

Avner Ash, Professor; A.B., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Jenny A. Baglivo, Professor; B.A., Fordham University; M.A., 

M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Solomon Friedberg, Professor; B.A., University of California, San 

Diego; M.S., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Margaret J. Kenney, Professor; B.S., M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., 

Boston University 

G. Robert Meyerhoff, Professor; A.B., Brown University; Ph.D., 

Princeton University 

Mark Reeder, Professor; B.A., Humboldt State University; M.S., 

University of Oregon; Ph.D., Ohio State University 

John H. Smith, Professor; KX>., Cornell University; Ph.D., 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Paul R. Thie, Professor; B.S., Canisius College; Ph.D., University 

of Notre Dame 

Robert J. Bond, Associate Professor; A.B., Boston College; Ph.D., 

Brown University 

Daniel W. Chambers, Associate Professor; B.S., University of Notre 

Dame; A.M., Ph.D., University of Maryland 



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C.K. Cheung, Associate Professor; B.Sc, University of Hong Kong; 

Ph.D., University of California 

Robert H. Gross, Associate Professor; A.B., Princeton University; 

Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Richard A. Jenson, Associate Professor; A.B., Dartmouth College; 

A.M., Ph.D., University of Illinois at Chicago Circle 

William J. Vieaac, Associate Professor; A.B., Boston College; M.S., 

Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Gerard E. Keough, Associate Professor; Chairperson of the 

Department; A.B., Boston College; Ph.D., Indiana University 

Charles Landraitis, Associate Professor; A.B., Wesleyan University; 

M.S., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Ph.D., Dartmouth 

College 

Rennie yiitoWo, Associate Professor; B.A., Columbia College; 

Ph.D., Harvard University 

Nancy E. Rallis, Associate Professor; A.B., Vassar College; M.A., 

Ph.D., Indiana University 

Ned I. Rosen, Associate Professor; B.S., Tufts University; M.A., 

Ph.D., University of Michigan 

John P. Shanahan, Associate Professor; B.S., M.S., University 

College, Galway; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 

Martin J. Bridgeman, Assistant Professor; B.A., Trinity College, 

Dublin; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 

Kevin Blount, Adjunct Instructor; B.S., M.S., University of 

Florida; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 

Marie Clote, Adjunct Instructor; M.A., D.E.A., University Paris VII 

Benji Fisher, Adjunct Instructor; A.^., Harvard University; Ph.D., 

Princeton 

Robert C. B^ed, Adjunct Instructor; B.A., University of California 

at Berkeley; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison 

Donald Wiener, Adjunct Instructor; B.A., Long Island University; 

M.A., Boston College 

Departmental Notes 

• Administrative Assistant: Mrs. Marilyn Adams, 
617-552-3750, marilyn.adams@bc.edu 

• Department Office: Carney Hall, Room 301 
Department FAX: 617-552-3789 

• World Wide Web: http://fmwww.bc.edu/MT/ 

Undergraduate Program Description 

The Mathematics program for majors is designed to provide a 
solid foundation in the main areas of mathematics and mathemati- 
cal applications. Course work is offered in preparation for careers in 
the actuarial profession, applied areas of government and industry, 
and education. Mathematics majors also make excellent candidates 
for law school. 

Courses are also available to support graduate study in pure and 
applied mathematics, computer science, operations research, and 
quantitative business management. 

Major Requirements 

The Mathematics major requires completion often (10) courses, 
as follows: 

• Six (6) required courses 

MT 103 Calculus II (Math/Science Majors) 

MT 202 Multivariable Calculus 

MT 210 Linear Algebra 

MT 216 Algebraic Structures 

MT 310 Introduction to Abstract Algebra 

MT 320 Introduction to Analysis 

• Four (4) elective courses 

Chosen from MT electives numbered between 400 and 499 
or above 800 



• A grade point average of at least 1.67 in the ten MT courses 
used to fulfill the major 

Well-prepared students may omit some of the required courses, 
upon recommendation of the Chairperson. However, students plac- 
ing out of one or more required courses are required to substitute 
MT electives for each course omitted. 

In order to fiilly appreciate the role of mathematics in other dis- 
ciplines, we strongly recommend that our majors supplement their pro- 
grams of study with courses in another discipline where mathematics 
plays an important role. Such courses can be found in the Department 
of Physics and elsewhere in the natural and social sciences. 
Departmental Honors 

The department offers to qualified Mathematics majors the 
opportunity to graduate with Departmental Honors. Students con- 
sidering graduate school in Mathematics would especially benefit 
from completing this program. 

Completion of the major with Honors requires a minimum of 
thirteen (13) courses: 

• Completion of 10 courses for the MT major, as listed above 

• MT 695 Honors Seminar (normally offered in spring semester) 

• Completion of two graduate level classes (numbered MT 800 
or above) 

• A grade point average of at least 3.0 in MT courses numbered 
300 or above 

Minor in Mathematics 

The Mathematics major requires completion of six (6) courses, 
as follows: 

• Three (3) required courses 

MT 101 Calculus II or MT 103 Calculus II 

(Math/Science Majors) 

MT 200 Intermediate Calculus or MT 202 

Multivariable Calculus 

MT 210 Linear Algebra 

• Three (3) elective courses, chosen from among the following: 

MT 216 Algebraic Structures 
MT 245 Discrete Mathematics 
MT 305 Advanced Calculus (Science majors) 
MT 310 Introduction to Abstract Algebra 
MT 320 Introduction to Analysis 
Any MT major course numbered 400 or higher 
Well-prepared students may omit some of the required cours- 
es, upon recommendation of the Chairperson. However, students 
placing out of one or more required courses are required to substi- 
tute MT electives for each course omitted. 

Certain elective courses are particularly well-suited for students 
minoring in Mathematics, according to their major: 

• Biology and Chemistry 

MT 410 Differential Equations 

Either MT 420 Probability and Statistics or MT 426 

Mathematical Probability (not both) 

MT 427 Mathematical Statistics 

MT 470 Modelling 

• Computer Science 

Either MT 245 Discrete Mathematics or MT 445 Applied 

Combinatorics (not both) 

MT 414 Numerical Analysis 

Either MT 420 Probability and Statistics or MT 426 

Mathematical Probability (not both) 

MT 427 Mathematical Statistics 

MT 430 Number Theory 

MT 435-MT436 Linear Programming I and II 



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MT 470 Modelling 

• Economics 

MT 410 Differential Equations 

MT 414 Numerical Analysis 

Either MT 420 Probability and Statistics or MT 426 

Mathematical Probability (not both) 

MT 427 Mathematical Statistics 

MT 435-MT436 Linear Programming I and II 

MT 470 Modelling 

• Physics 

MT 410 Differential Equations 

MT 414 Numerical Analysis 

Either MT 420 Probability and Statistics or MT 426 

Mathematical Probability (not both) 

MT 427 Mathematical Statistics 

MT 440 Dynamical Systems 

MT 451 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry 

MT460 Complex Variables 

MT 470 Modelling 
Information for Study Abroad 

Normally, Mathematics majors should have completed MT 
103, MT 202, MT 210, and MT 216 before going abroad. For stu- 
dents abroad in the second semester of junior year only, it is also 
strongly recommended that you complete one of either MT 3 1 or 
MT 320 before leaving. 

Normally, majors take no more than two mathematics courses 
per semester while abroad (in fact, a majority complete only one 
course). All mathematics courses to be used for major credit must be 
approved beforehand. 

There are no restrictions on what type of course students may 
take while abroad, but almost all will count as electives. (In particular, 
MT 310 and MT 320 are ofi:en difficult to find overseas.) Choices 
most commonly available include courses in Differential Equations, 
Graph Theory/Combinatorics, Number Theory, Complex Analysis, 
Probability & Statistics, and Operations Research. 

The department recommends the programs at King's College 
London, University of Melbourne, and Murdoch University. For 
course approval, contact Professor Keough (Chairperson), Professor 
Rosen (Assistant Chairperson), or Professor Reeder (Study Abroad 
Advisor for Mathematics). 
Choosing Courses and Fulfilling Core Requirements 

All students at Boston College are required to complete one 
mathematics course as part of the University Core Curriculum. A 
score of 3 or higher on the BC Advanced Placement Exam, or a score 
of 4 or higher on the AB Advanced Placement Exam (once recorded 
on your transcript by the Admissions Office), exempts you from this 
Core requirement. 

Some schools or major programs, however, may require more 
than this minimum, or perhaps require a specific Calculus course or 
courses. Basic guidelines for students who fall into these categories 
(or who are seriously thinking about choosing majors in these cate- 
gories) are as follows: 

Majors in Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Geology, or 
Geophysics 

Enroll in your first semester of freshman year in one of the 
Calculus courses MT 102 (Calculus I/Math and Science), MT 103 
(Calculus II/Math and Science), or MT 202 (Multivariable 
Calculus). If you have had a year of calculus, MT 103 is usually the 
most appropriate choice. Particularly well-prepared students should 
consider MT 202. 



Majors in Biology or Computer Science, and all Premedical students 

Enroll in your first semester of freshman year in one of the 
Calculus courses MT 100 (Calculus I), MT 101 (Calculus II), or 
MT 200 (Calculus III). If you have had a year of calculus (the "AB" 
curriculum), MT 101 is usually the most appropriate choice. 
Particularly well-prepared students should consider MT 200. If you 
have a strong interest in mathematics, you should consider choosing 
a Calculus course from the MT 102-MT 103-MT 202 sequence, 
mentioned above. 
Carroll School of Management students 

If you've not received AP credit for Calculus, you should com- 
plete one of the Calculus courses MT 100 (Calculus I), MT 101 
(Calculus II), or MT 200 (Calculus III) in one of the semesters of 
freshman year. If you have had a year of calculus, MT 101 is usual- 
ly the most appropriate choice. Particularly well-prepared students 
should consider MT 200. 

For all other students seeking to fulfill the Core requirement 
in mathematics, you may take a Core-level mathematics course at 
any time — it need not be (and sometimes simply cannot be) com- 
pleted right away in freshman year. You certainly have the option to 
elect a Calculus course for the core requirement, but there often may 
be more appropriate course selections available to you, such as: 

• MT 004 Finite Mathematics (e.g., Psychology majors. 
Nursing students) 

• MT 005 Linear Mathematics (e.g.. Psychology majors) 

• MT 007 Ideas in Mathematics 
MT 020 Survey of Calculus 

• MT 190 Mathematics for Teachers (e.g., LSOE students in 
Elementary Education or Human Development) 

Graduate Program Description 

Master of Arts Program 

The Department of Mathematics offers a flexible M.A. pro- 
gram for students wishing to study mathematics at an advanced 
level. Beyond the common core of required courses described below, 
students may elect courses according to their individual interests. 
Courses are available in both pure and applied areas for students 
wanting to broaden their background for entrance to a doctoral pro- 
gram or before seeking employment in government, industry, or 
education. 

In particular, pure mathematics courses are routinely offered in 
real and complex analysis, algebra, and logic. In applied areas, cours- 
es to meet specific needs are provided, including MT 850 Methods 
of Applied Mathematics. For a student interested in a career in actu- 
arial mathematics, the department offers courses in probability and 
statistics, numerical analysis, and mathematical programming (oper- 
ations research), together with occasional offerings of MT 851 
Stochastic Processes and MT 853 Topics in Modern Statistics. 
Students interested in computer science may consider courses 
offered by the Computer Science Department of the Carroll School 
of Management, at the level of Computer Science II and higher. 

Students interested in a teaching career at the secondary level 
should be aware that because of certification requirements, unless 
approved equivalents have been taken previously, their course work 
should include the following: 

• MT 451 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry 

• MT 426-427 Probability and Mathematical Statistics 

• Some exposure to the use of computers in mathematics, in 
courses such as Scientific Computing 

The requirements for the degree are 30 credit hours of courses 
(10 courses) in the department and participation in a 3-credit semi- 
nar (MT 903). Under special circumstances, with the approval of the 



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Graduate Committee and the Department Chair, a student can sat- 
isfy the degree requirements with 27 credit hours of courses (9 cours- 
es) and a thesis (6 credit hours). 

Among the 10 courses used for graduation, students are 
required to include (or have the equivalent of) MT 804-805 
Analysis I-II, MT 816-817 Modern Algebra I-II, MT 814 Complex 
Variables I, and one additional course at the level of 800 or higher. 
All students must pass a written comprehensive examination in 
analysis and algebra (based on MT 804-805 and MT 816-817). 

Subject to approval of the Graduate Committee, a student may 
receive credit for the following undergraduate courses: MT 414 
Numerical Analysis, MT 426 Probability, MT 427 Mathematical 
Statistics, MT 430 Number Theory, MT 435-436 Linear 
Programming I-Il, MT 440 Dynamical Systems, MT 445 Applied 
Combinatorics, MT 451 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry, 
MT 470 Modelling, and computer science major courses beyond 
Computer Science I. However, students may be required to do extra 
work in these courses in order to earn graduate credit. Beyond the 
ten courses used to satisfy the degree requirements, students may 
take some additional courses in or outside the department. 

Each graduate student should consult with the Director of the 
Graduate Program to develop a program suitable for his or her 
needs. Final approval for each student's program is granted by the 
Graduate Committee. 

Master of Science in Teaching Program 

The Master of Science in Teaching (M.S.T) program is admin- 
istered through the Lynch Graduate School of Education in cooper- 
ation with the Department of Mathematics. Application for the pro- 
gram is made to the Lynch Graduate School of Education, and stu- 
dents must be accepted by both the Lynch School of Education and 
the Department of Mathematics. 

This program is designed either for experienced teachers or for 
prospective teachers. It is a two-year program that consists of 46 
credits, of which 31 are in Education and 15 (5 courses) are in 
Mathematics. All Master's programs leading to certification in sec- 
ondary education include practica experiences in addition to course 
work. Students seeking certification in Massachusetts are required to 
pass the Massachusetts Educators Certification Test. Degree candi- 
dates draw up an overall plan of study with joint advisement from 
the Director of the Graduate Program in Mathematics and the advi- 
sor for the M.S.T. program in the Lynch School of Education. For 
further information on the M.S.T, please refer to the Lynch School 
of Education section entitled, "Master's Programs in Secondary 
Teaching," or call the Office of Graduate Admissions, LSOE, at 
(617) 552-4214. 

Of the five courses which comprise the mathematics compo- 
nent of the M.S.T, candidates are required to complete MT 804- 
805 Analysis I-IL The other three must be MT courses at or above 
the 400 level. Because of certification requirements, unless approved 
equivalents have been taken previously, these required courses 
should include the following: 

• MT 451 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry 

• Either MT 420 Probability and Statistics or MT 426-427 
Probability and Mathematical Statistics 

• Some exposure to the use of computers in mathematics — that 
may be accomplished by any computer science major course 
beyond Computer Science I 

Another course particularly well suited for this program is MT 
430 Number Theory. 

M.S.T. candidates must also pass an oral comprehensive examina- 
tion and submit a brief expository paper in some area of mathematics. 



Mathematics M.A.-M.B.A. Dual Degree 

This dual degree program is offered in conjunction with the 
Carroll Graduate School of Management. Students must be accepted 
into both programs. The program takes three years, the first of which 
is the same as the Mathematics M.A. (18 credits in mathematics 
including MT 804-805 and MT 816-817). The second year is all 
management, the equivalent to the first year of the M.B.A. program. 

After completion of the second year, twenty-four credits 
remain, twelve each in mathematics and in management. A student 
may take six management credits in the summer, in which case only 
eighteen credits need to be taken in the third year and a 
Mathematics Teaching Fellowship is possible. Alternatively, all twen- 
ty-four credits may be taken in year three, which precludes a 
Teaching Fellowship, although some Research Fellowships in 
CGSOM may be available. 

The Mathematics requirements for the dual degree program 
are identical to the regular Mathematics M.A., including the 
Comprehensive Exam, except that only 30 credits (rather than 33) 
are required and the Graduate Seminar is not required. The 
Management requirements amount to the M.B.A. requirements 
minus 12 credits of electives. 
M.Ed, in Mathematics 

The Master of Education in Secondary Mathematics consists 
of 31 education credits, but requires only 6 credits in mathematics. 
M.Ed, students are not eligible for Teaching Fellowships in mathe- 
matics, but the program may be completed in as little as one year 
plus two summers. Application materials and information on the 
education component are obtainable from Lynch School of 
Education. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
Non-Core Courses 

These courses do not satisfy the University Core requirement in 
Mathematics. They are intended either to remove a deficiency in the 
student's mathematical background in preparation for further cours- 
es or as an enrichment in an area related to mathematics. 
MT 010 Pre-Calculus Mathematics (Fall: 3) 

This is a one-semester course designed for students who wish 
to take an introductory calculus course, especially MT 100, but have 
a deficient background in high school mathematics. Other students 
should proceed directly to the appropriate calculus course. Topics 
include functions and graphs, exponential and logarithmic func- 
tions, and trigonometry. This course does not satisfy the University 
Core requirement in mathematics. 
Core Courses 

These courses do satisfy the University Core requirement in 
mathematics. Included are general non-calculus courses for students 
in the humanities, social sciences. Lynch School of Education, and 
School of Nursing; specialized non-calculus courses; terminal calcu- 
lus courses; and continuing calculus courses, from which students 
may proceed to further study. 
MT 004 Finite Probability and Applications (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course, for students in the humanities, the social sciences. 
School of Education, and School of Nursing, is an introduction to 
finite combinatorics and probability, emphasizing applications. 
Topics include finite sets and partitions, enumeration, probability, 
expectation, and random variables. 



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MT 005 Linear Mathematics and Applications (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This is an introduction to Unear methods and their appUca- 
tions. Topics include systems of equations, matrices, modeling, lin- 
ear programming, and Markov chains. 
MT 007 Ideas in Mathematics (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the spirit, 
beauty, and vitality of mathematics. The emphasis is on develop- 
ment of ideas rather than problem solving skills. Topics vary, but are 
typically chosen from diverse areas such as geometry, number theo- 
ry, computation, and graph theory. 
Specialized Non-Calculus Courses 
MT 190-191 Fundamentals of Mathematics I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 3) 
Restricted to Lynch School of Education students 

MT 190-191 is a course sequence designed for those who plan 
to teach mathematics in grades K-9. The emphasis is on the content 
of mathematics in the emerging K-9 curriculum and its interface 
with current major issues in mathematics education — problem solv- 
ing and technology. Topics to be covered include the real number 
system — ^with motivational activities and applications, functions and 
their graphs, problem solving with calculators and computers, and 
elements of probability and statistics. 
Terminal Calculus Courses 
MT 020 Survey of Calculus (Fall/Spring: 3) 

MT 020 is not open to students who have completed a calculus 
course at the secondary school or college level. Do not take this 
course if you plan to take more than one semester of calculus. 

This course is an overview of differential and integral calculus 
for students in the liberal arts, emphasizing fundamental concepts 
and practical applications. 
Continuing Calculus Courses 
MT 100-101 Calculus I and II (FaU/Spring: 4) 
Prerequisite: Trigonometry 

MT 100-101 is a course sequence in the calculus of one vari- 
able intended for biology, computer science, economics, manage- 
ment and premedical students, but open to all who are qualified. 
Topics include limits, derivatives, integrals, transcendental func- 
tions, techniques of integration, and applications. MT 100 is not 
open to students who have completed a calculus course at the col- 
lege level. 

MT 102-103 Calculus (Math/Science Majors) I and II 
(Fall/Spring: 4) 
Prerequisite: Trigonometry 

Not open to students who have completed a calculus course at the 
college level. 

The MT 102-103 sequence is for students majoring in mathe- 
matics, chemistry, geology, geophysics, or physics. Topics covered 
include the algebraic and analytic properties of the real number sys- 
tem, functions, limits, derivatives, integrals, applications of the 
derivative and integral, and sequences and infinite series. 
Undergraduate Electives 

These courses are usually taken after completing one or more 
continuing Core course, and they are primarily intended for mathe- 
matics majors, science majors, and students in the professional 
schools that are interested in mathematics. 



MT 202 Multivariable Calculus (Fall/Spring: 4) 

Prerequisite: MT 103 

This course is for students majoring in mathematics, chemistry, 
geology, geophysics, or physics. Topics include vectors in two and 
three dimensions, analytic geometry of three dimensions, curves and 
surfaces, partial derivatives, and multiple integrals. 
MT 210 Linear Algebra (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course is an introduction to the techniques of linear alge- 
bra in Euclidean space. Topics covered include matrices, determi- 
nants, systems of linear equations, vectors in n-dimensional space, 
complex numbers, and eigenvalues. The course is required of math- 
ematics majors, but is also suitable for students in the social sciences, 
natural sciences, and management. 

MT 216 Algebraic Structures (Fall/Spring: 3) 

This course is designed to develop the student's ability to do 
abstract mathematics through the presentation and development of 
the basic notions of logic and proof Topics include elementary set the- 
ory, mappings, integers, rings, complex numbers, and polynomials. 
MT 235 Mathematics for Management Science (FaU/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: MT 100 or equivalent, MC 021, and EC 151 

Topics include linear and integer programming, decision analy- 
sis, non-linear optimization, and computer solutions using Excel. 
MT 290 Number Theory for Teachers (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: MT 190-191 

This course is intended to focus on the wealth of topics that 
relate specifically to the natural numbers. These will be treated as 
motivational problems to be used in an activity-oriented approach to 
mathematics in grades K-9. The course will demonstrate effective 
ways to use the calculator and computer in mathematics education. 
Topics include prime number facts and conjectures, magic squares, 
Pascal's triangle, Fibonacci numbers, modular arithmetic, and math- 
ematical art. 

MT 291 Geometry for Teachers (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: MT 190-191 

This course is intended to fill a basic need of all teachers of 
grades K-9. Geometry now occupies a significant role in the ele- 
mentary mathematics curriculum. The course will treat content, but 
ideas for presenting geometry as an activity-based program will also 
be stressed. Topics to be covered include the geoboard and other key 
manipulatives, elements of motion and Euclidean geometry, and 
suggestions for using Logo as a tool to enhance teaching geometry. 
MT 305 Advanced Calculus (Science Majors) (Spring: 4) 
Prerequisite: MT 202 

Topics include the following: linear second order differential 
equations, series solutions of differential equations including Bessel 
functions and Legendre polynomials, solutions of the diffusion and 
wave equations in several dimensions. 
MT 310 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: MT 210 and MT 216 

This course studies four fundamental algebraic structures: 
groups, including subgroups, cyclic groups, permutation groups, 
symmetry groups and Lagrange's Theorem; rings, including sub- 
rings, integral domains, and unique factorization domains; polyno- 
mials, including a discussion of unique factorization and methods 
for finding roots; fields, introducing the basic ideas of field exten- 
sions and ruler and compass constructions. 
MT 320 Introduction to Analysis (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: MT 202 and MT 216 

The purpose of this course is to give students the theoretical 
foundations for the topics taught in MT 102-103. It will cover alge- 



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braic and order properties of the real numbers, the least upper bound 
axiom, limits, continuity, differentiation, the Riemann integral, 
sequences, and series. Definitions and proofs will be stressed 
throughout the course. 
Mathematics Major Electives 

These courses are primarily taken to fulfill the elective require- 
ments of the mathematics major. 
MT 410 Differential Equations (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: MT 202 and MT 210 

This course is a junior-senior elective intended primarily for the 
general student who is interested in seeing applications of mathemat- 
ics. Among the topics covered will be the following: first order linear 
equations, second order linear equations, general nth order equations 
with constant coefficients, series solutions, and special functions. 
MT 420 Probability and Statistics (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 202 

This course is not open to students who have completed MT 426. 
Students interested in actuarial sciences should take the MT 426- 
427 sequence. 

This course is introductory but assumes a calculus background. 
Its purpose is to provide an overview of the basic concepts of proba- 
bility and statistics and their applications. Topics include probability 
functions over discrete and continuous sample spaces, independence 
and conditional probabilities, random variables and their distribu- 
tions, sampling theory, the central limit theorem, expectation, confi- 
dence intervals and estimation, and hypothesis testing. 
MT 426 Probability (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: MT 202, familiarity with the Mathematica program- 
ming language 
This course is not open to students who have completed MT 420. 

This course provides a general introduction to modern proba- 
bility theory. Topics include probability spaces, discrete and contin- 
uous random variables, joint and conditional distributions, mathe- 
matical expectation, the central limit theorem, and the weak law of 
large numbers. Applications to real data will be stressed, and we will 
use the computer to explore many concepts. 
MT 427 Mathematical Statistics (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 426 or MT 420; familiarity with the Mathematica 
programming language 

Topics studied include the following: sampling distributions, 
parametric point and interval estimation, hypothesis testing, good- 
ness-of-fit, parametric and nonparametric two-sample analysis. 
Applications to real data will be stressed, and the computer will be 
used to explore concepts and analyze data. 
MT 430 Introduction to Number Theory (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 216 

Topics covered include divisibility, unique factorization, con- 
gruences, number-theoretic functions, primitive roots, diophantine 
equations, continued fractions, quadratic residues, and the distribu- 
tion of primes. An attempt will be made to provide historical back- 
ground for various problems and to provide examples useful in the 
secondary school curriculum. 
MT 435 Mathematical Programming I (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 210 

The MT 435-436 sequence demonstrates how mathematical 
theory can be developed and applied to solve problems from man- 
agement, economics, and the social sciences. Topics studied from 
linear programming include a general discussion of linear optimiza- 
tion models, the theory and development of the simplex algorithm, 
degeneracy, duality, sensitivity analysis, and the dual simplex algo- 



rithm. Integer programming problems, and the transportation and 
assignment problems are considered, and algorithms are developed 
for their resolution. Other topics are drawn from game theory, 
dynamic programming, Markov decision processes (with finite and 
infinite horizons), network analysis, and non-linear programming. 
Paul R. Thie 

MT 436 Mathematical Programming II (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 435 

This course is a continuation of MT 435. 
Paul R. Thie 

MT 440 Dynamical Systems (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 202 or permission of the instructor 

This course is an introduction to the theory of iterated func- 
tions of a single variable. Topics include the following: fixed points, 
periodic points, the quadratic family, bifurcations, one and two 
dimensional chaos, fractals, iterated function systems, Julia sets, and 
the Mandelbrot set. 

MT 445 Applied Combinatorics (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: A year of calculus; a course in linear algebra, abstract 
algebra, or multivariable calculus 
Not open to students who have completed MT 245 or MC 248. 

This is a course in enumeration and graph theory. The object 
of the course is to develop proficiency in solving discrete mathemat- 
ics problems. Among the topics covered are the following: counting 
methods for arrangements and selections, the pigeonhole principle, 
the inclusion-exclusion principle, generating functions, recurrence 
relations, graph theory, trees and searching, and network algorithms. 
The problem-solving techniques developed apply to the analysis of 
computer systems, but most of the problems in the course are from 
recreational mathematics. 

MT 451 Euclidean and Non-Euclidean Geometry (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 216 

This course surveys the history and foundations of geometry 
from ancient to modern times. Topics will be selected from among 
the following: Mesopotamian and Egyptian mathematics, Greek 
geometry, the axiomatic method, history of the parallel postulate, 
the Lobachevskian plane, Hilbert's axioms for Euclidean geometry, 
elliptic and projective geometry, the trigonometric formulas, mod- 
els, geometry and the study of physical space. 
MT 460 Complex Variables (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 202; MT 302 recommended 

This course gives an introduction to the theory of functions of 
a complex variable, a fundamental and central area of mathematics. 
It is intended for mathematics majors and well-prepared science 
majors. Topics covered include: complex numbers and their proper- 
ties, analytic functions and the Cauchy-Riemann equations, the log- 
arithm and other elementary functions of a complex variable, inte- 
gration of complex functions, the Cauchy integral theorem and its 
consequences, power series representation of analytic functions, the 
residue theorem and applications to definite integrals. 
MT 470 Mathematical Modeling (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisites: MT 202, MT 210, and familiarity with the 
Mathematica programming language. 

This is a course primarily for mathematics majors with the pur- 
pose of introducing the student to the creation, use and analysis of a 
variety of mathematical models and to reinforce and deepen the 
mathematical and logical skills required of modelers. A secondary 
purpose is to develop a sense of the existing and potential roles of 
both small and large scale models in our scientific civilization. It pro- 
ceeds through the study of the model-building process, examination 



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of exemplary models, and individual and group efforrs to build or 
refine models through a succession of problem sets, laboratory exer- 
cises, and field work. 
MT 480 Mathematics Seminar (Spring: 3) 

Topics for this one-semester course vary from year to year 
according to the interests of faculty and students. With department 
permission it may be repeated. For spring 2003, the topic will be the 
History of Mathematics. 

MT 499 Readings and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Department permission is required. 

This is an independent study course, taken under the supervi- 
sion of a Mathematics Department faculty member. Interested stu- 
dents should see the Chairperson. 
MT 695 Honors Seminar (Spring: 3) 

This is a seminar course required of students in the 
Departmental Honors program. Other interested students may also 
participate in the seminar, with permission of the instructor. 

Graduate Course Offerings 
MT 801 Thesis Seminar (Fall: 3) 

Problems of research and thesis guidance, supplemented by 
individual conferences. 
MT 804 Analysis I (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 320 or equivalent 

The MT 804-805 sequence is intended to emphasize the basic 
ideas and results of calculus and to provide an introduction to abstract 
analysis. The course begins with an axiomatic introduction to the real 
number system. Metric spaces are then introduced. Theoretical aspects 
of convergence, continuity, differentiation, and integration are treated 
carefully and are studied in the context of a metric space. The course 
includes an introduction to the Lebesgue integral. 
MT 805 Analysis II (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 804 

This course is a continuation of MT 804. 
MT 814 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisites: MT 320 or MT 324-325 or equivalent 

Topics for the MT 814-815 sequence include: differentiation 
and integration of a function of a complex variable, series expansion, 
residue theory, entire and meromorphic functions, multiple-valued 
functions, Riemann surfaces, and conformal mapping problems. 
MT 815 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable II (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 814 

This course is a continuation of MT 814. 
MT 816 Modern Algebra I (Fall: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 3 1 or permission of instructor 

The MT 816-817 course sequence will study the basic struc- 
tures of abstract algebra. Topics will include groups, rings, ideal the- 
ory, unique factorization, homomorphisms, field extensions, and 
Galois theory. 

MT 817 Modern Algebra II (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 816 

This course is a continuation of MT 816. 
MT 851 Stochastic Processes (Spring: 3) 

Prerequisites: Multivariable calculus-based probability course; in par- 
ticular, the material in MT 420 or MT 426 is sufficient background. 

We'll start with a brief review of probability theory, random vari- 
ables, and standard distributions, then study conditional expectations, 
discrete time Markov chains, the Exponential distribution and Poisson 
processes, continuous-time Markov chains (including birth and death 
processes), renewal theory, and, time permitting, Brownian motion. 
Daniel Chambers 



MT 860 Mathematical Logic (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisite: MT 310 or MT 320 or permission of the instructor 

This course is a mathematical examination of the way mathe- 
matics is done and of axiom systems, logical inference, and the ques- 
tions that can (or cannot) be resolved by inference from those 
axioms. Specific topics will include propositional calculus, first order 
theories, decidability, and Godel's Completeness Theorem. 
Ned Rosen 

MT 861 Foundations of Mathematics (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MT 860 or equivalent 

Topics to be treated in this course will be selected from one or 
more of the following areas: formal number theory, axiomatic set 
theory, effective computability, and recursive function theory. 
Ned Rosen 
MT 880 Advanced Topics in Mathematics (Fall/Spring: 3) 

Topics of this one-semester course vary according to the inter- 
ests of faculty and students. With department permission it may be 
repeated. 
MT 888 Interim Study (Fall/Spring: 0) 

Required for master's candidates who have completed all course 
requirements but have not taken comprehensive examinations. Also 
for master's students (only) who have taken up to six credits of 
Thesis Seminar but have not yet finished writing their thesis. 

MT 899 Readings and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Department permission is required. 

This is an independent study course, taken under the supervi- 
sion of a Mathematics Department faculty member. Interested stu- 
dents should see the Director of the Graduate Program. 
MT 903 Seminar (Spring: 3) 

This seminar is required of all candidates for the M.A. degree 
who do not take MT 801. 

Music 

Faculty 

T. Frank Kennedy, S.J., Professor; Chairperson of the Department; 

B.A., Boston College; M.F.A., Tulane University; Diploma in 

Pastoral Theology, University of London; Ph.D., University of 

California, Santa Barbara 

Thomas Oboe Lee, Professor; B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.M. 

New England Conservatory; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Jeremiah W. McGrann, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., Austin 

College; Ph.D., Harvard University 

Jerry CsiAAcn, Assistant Professor; B.M.Ed., University of Southern 

Mississippi; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

John Finney, Senior Lecturer, Distinguished Artist in Residence; 

B.M., Oberlin College; M.M., Boston Conservatory 

Departmental Notes 

* Administrative Secretary: Pattie Longbottom, 
617-552-8720, patricia.longbottom@bc.edu 

• World Wide Web: http://www.bc.edu/bc_org/ 
avp/cas/music/ 

Undergraduate Program Description 

Whether for students intending a career in music or those pur- 
suing their own love of the art, the Department of Music offers 
courses in theory and composition, in the history and current trends 
of both Western and non- Western music, and lessons in perfor- 
mance. All students, regardless of musical background, are welcome 
in any course unless a prerequisite or permission of instructor is indi- 
cated (as for certain theory courses). 

The department offers a variety of courses (MU 070, MU 005, 
MU 066, MU 030) that satisfy the University Core requirement in 



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the Arts and that serve as introductions to the various areas of musi- 
cal knowledge. MU 070 Fundamentals of Music Theory focuses on 
technical aspects of the language of music and serves as a prerequisite 
to Tonal Harmony and further upper level courses in theory and 
composition, such as Chromatic Harmony, Counterpoint, as well as 
Jazz Harmony, Instrumentation, and the Seminar in Composition. 
MU 005 The Musical Experience and MU 066 Introduction to 
Music offer broad surveys of music history and styles of music, while 
upper level courses focus on either various periods of Western music 
history (Middle Ages and Renaissance, Baroque, Classical Era, 
Romantic Era, 20th century), the historical development of various 
genres (Opera, Symphony), or the contributions of various individ- 
ual composers (Bach, Beethoven, Wagner). MU 030 History of Rock 
and Roll and Popular Musics in the US offers a socio-historical 
approach to the history and context of commercial popular music; 
upper level cross-cultural courses deal with Western traditions (such 
as Celtic Musics, Irish Folk Music, Music in America, Rhythm and 
Blues) and non- Western traditions. MU 310 Introduction to Musics 
of the World and MU 325 Musics of the Mediterranean satisfy the 
Cultural Diversity requirement of the Core. 

For the Music major, a liberal arts framework offers a broader 
outlook than that of either a conservatory or a school of music. In a 
liberal arts framework, students encounter historical, theoretical, 
cultural, ethnographic and performance perspectives on music. The 
student majoring in music at Boston College may find employment 
in teaching, in communications or arts administration, in liturgical 
music, or may major in music simply to provide a firm discipline for 
the mind or a source of lifelong enjoyment. Some students may go 
on to graduate school or a conservatory to become professional per- 
formers, composers, musicologists, or ethnomusicologists. Within 
the major, all students receive a common base of knowledge with a 
specialization at higher levels in such areas as composition, perfor- 
mance, music history or cross-cultural studies. A grounding not only 
in the traditional musical skills of Western fine-art music but also 
knowledge of music of the twentieth century, of American music, 
and of the traditions of other cultures is considered indispensable. 

Credit for Performance 

Students may bundle single credits for performance into one 
three-credit course in one of two ways: (1) Students may receive 
three credits equivalent to a full course after taking three semesters 
of individual hour lessons for credit in voice or on the same instru- 
ment (Vocal/Instrumental Instruction) and, at the end of their 
semester of instruction, the student must perform before a jury of 
the performance faculty. The evaluation will be submitted to the 
Chairperson of the department for approval. (2) Students may 
receive three credits equivalent to a full course if they have taken 
three semesters of one of the following: Introduction to Vocal 
Performance, Gospel Workshop, Improvisation, or the Traditional 
Irish Music Ensembles and at sometime during their four years at 
Boston College have taken MU 070 Fundamentals of Music (for 
Introduction to Vocal Performance and Improvisation), MU 330 
Introduction to Irish Traditional Music or MU 331 Introduction to 
Celtic Musics (for the Irish Traditional Music Ensembles) , and MU 
321 Rhythm and Blues in America or MU 322 Jazz in America (for 
Gospel Workshop) . Individual Instrumental Instruction, either cred- 
it or non-credit, and Voice for Performance both require an extra fee. 
In addition, several free, non-credit performance courses offer 
instruction and/or coaching in various instruments and ensembles. 
Major Requirements 

• Optional Introductory Course (depending on previous knowl- 
edge of music theory): Fundamentals of Music Theory (MU 



070) may be substituted for one of the electives, with the 
approval of the Chairperson. 

Theory, Analysis, and Composition Courses: (4 courses total) 
Prerequisite: MU 070 Fundamentals of Music Theory or 
equivalent 

Required of all majors: MU 1 1 Harmony, MU 2 1 1 
Chromatic Harmony, MU 312 Counterpoint 
Choice of any one course: MU 212 Orchestration, MU 214 
Form and Analysis, MU 215 Jazz Harmony, MU 315 
Composition Seminar 
Historical Courses: (3 courses total) 

Required of all majors: MU 209 Twentieth Century Music 
Choice of any two:*}A\] 201 Medieval-Renaissance Music, 
MU 203 Music of the Baroque, MU 205 Music of the Classic 
Era, MU 207 Music of the Romantic Era 
* With permission of the Chairperson, a composer or genre 
course may be substituted for one of these. 
Cross-Cultural Courses: (2 courses total) 
Required of all majors, a choice of one from each of the fol- 
lowing two groups: 
Group I 

MU 301 Introduction to World Music* 

MU 325 Musics of the Mediterranean* 

MU 350 Topics in Ethnomusicology 

*MU 301 and MU 325 also satisfy the Core Cultural 

Diversity requirement 
Group II 

MU 320 Music and America 

MU 321 Rhythm and Blues in American Music 

MU 322 Jazz in America 

MU 330 Introduction to Irish Folk Music 

MU 331 Introduction to Celtic Musics 
Required Senior Seminar: (1 semester) 
The Senior Seminar (MU 405) will ordinarily be open only 
to senior Music majors. The Seminar entails a series of weekly 
projects allowing majors a framework for investigating issues 
in-depth with special emphasis in one of the following areas: 
theory and composition, history, cross-cultural, or perfor- 
mance. The Seminar serves as preparation for a senior project 
with supervised reading, research, writing, and discussion. 
Electives: (2 courses) 

The student will choose a minimum of two semester courses 
in any category whether it is in music theory and composition, 
performance, history, or cross-cultural studies. Students with 
performance emphasis must have three semesters of private 
instruction for credit. The three credits for private instruction 
will be granted only upon completion of the third semester of 
lessons. Music majors taking private instruction for credit will 
perform for a jury of faculty members at the end of each 
semester. Students with performance emphasis will also fulfill 
the required two semesters of ensemble participation. 
Performance Ensemble Experience: (Minimum of two semesters) 
Choose from among the following: Boston College 
Symphony Orchestra; Chamber Music Ensemble; Popular 
Styles Ensemble; Irish Traditional Fiddle Class or Early Music 
Ensemble; University Chorale, Madrigals, or other approved 
singing group; concert band or jazz band; folk, rock, or non- 
Western ensemble (by consultation with Chairperson) . 
Cumulative listening Competency and Ear Training/ Sight 
Singing: 

Majors will be asked to identify important works from the 
Western tradition in a series of Listening Competency exams. 



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Each year of the Music major (normally three), a list of works 
will be given to the student that they must be able to identify 
by the end of the year. A listening test on each of three lists of 
works will be administered until the student passes. In addi- 
tion, all seniors will be expected to have passed the minimum 
competency requirements for Ear Training and Sight-Singing 
before graduation. (The course MU 081-082 Ear-Training 
and Sight-Singing, a one-credit course, is recommended as an 
aid to passing this test.) 
Minor Requirements 

The Music department has designed a minor in music as a seri- 
ous alternative for students who are vitally interested in music, but 
either do not wish to make music their career or go on to graduate 
studies, or who have majors that preclude taking music as a second 
major. The total number of courses required for the minor in music 
is six. Those wishing to minor in music should take the following: 

• One of the following: MU 070 Fundamentals of Music 
Theory (if they do not have the background in music theory 
needed before entering MU 110 Harmony) or MU 005 The 
Musical Experience or MU 030 History of Rock & Roll and 
Popular Music in the US or MU 066 Introduction to Music. 

• Two additional music theory courses (usually MU 110 
Harmony and MU 2 1 1 Chromatic Harmony, but others may 
be substituted upon consultation with the department 
Chairperson). 

• Three historical and cross-cultural electives: 1 period course, 1 
composer or genre course, 1 cross-cultural course. 

The choice of courses should be made in conjunction with an 
advisor from the Music department. In addition, each student 
should plan to participate in at least two semesters of credit or non- 
credit performance experience (either as a member of an ensemble or 
through private lessons), as approved by the department. The per- 
formance option when taken for credit requires three semesters for 
the equivalent of a three-credit course, which could be substituted 
for one of the courses upon petition to the department. 
Honors 

In order to graduate with departmental honors, a Music major 
must maintain a grade point average of 3.5 in the major, pass the 
Ear-Training and Listening Repertoire requirements with a high 
score, and produce a final project, recital, or paper deemed worthy 
of honors. 
Information for First Year Majors and Non-Majors 

Included in the University's Core Curriculum is one (1) course 
in the Arts (Fine Arts, Music, Theatre). MU 005 The Musical 
Experience, MU 033 History of Rock and Roll & Popular Musics in 
the U.S., MU 066 Introduction to Music, and MU 070 
Fundamentals of Music Theory are the Music Department's Core 
offerings. They are designed for the non-musician as well as the stu- 
dent who has studied music. Prospective Music majors should refer- 
ence the Recommended Course of Study listed below. Students with 
advanced musical backgrounds and interests should speak to the 
department Chairperson regarding appropriate upper-level courses. 

MU 301 Introduction to World Music and MU 325 Musics of 
the Mediterranean fulfill the Cultural Diversity Core requirement. 
Information for Study Abroad 

Although the Music department designates no particular pre- 
requisites, the department expects that the 4 courses of the Music 
Theory Sequence be completed before going abroad, as well as a 
couple of electives. Whether courses taken abroad will count toward 
major credit depends on the program that the student's university 
offers. Usually students complete 6 or 9 credits, however, students 



have had as many as 12 credits completed abroad. It is important to 
note that the Theory Sequence (4 courses) may not be taken abroad, 
nor can the Senior Seminar. Music majors may not be abroad first 
semester senior year. Twentieth Century Music should be taken at 
Boston College, but depending on the program abroad, exceptions 
can be made. 

Majors should speak to their advisors and/or the Chairperson, 
Frank Kennedy, as soon as they decide to go abroad. There is no 
problem as long as the appropriate planning is done. The depart- 
ment recommends that students look into the music programs 
offered at King's College London and University College Cork. 
Recommended Course of Study 
Freshman Year 

All students declaring the music major should try as freshmen 
to take or test out of MU 070 Fundamentals of Music Theory, a 
course covering the notation of music and fundamental ear-training. 
Freshmen who feel they may wish to consider majoring in music (or 
wish to fulfill the Core requirement in Fine Arts by taking a music 
course) should take MU 005 The Musical Experience or MU 066 
Introduction to Music. Either of these courses is a general introduc- 
tion to the field and its various methodologies, and a student may 
receive retroactive credit for the major if passed with a B+ or higher. 
Sophomore Year 

Harmony and Chromatic Harmony should be taken in sequence 
along with MU 081-082, Ear Training/Sight Singing Labs. Two his- 
tory courses in Western Music (selected from Medieval-Renaissance, 
Baroque Music, Music of the Classical Era, Music of the Romantic 
Era, Music of the Twentieth Century, or a composer or genre course) 
or one history course and one cross-cultural course should be taken. 
The first year's required Listening Repertoire should be mastered. 
Some performance experience (Orchestra, Chorale, Band, Chamber 
Music, non- Western performance, and/or private lessons) should be 
started and pursued throughout the rest of the major. 
Junior Year 

Counterpoint and a choice of Jazz Harmony, Form and 
Analysis, Orchestration or Composition and a second or third his- 
tory course and/or a cross-cultural course should be taken. The sec- 
ond year of the required Listening Repertoire should be mastered. 
Senior Year 

Any advanced courses in the department relevant to the partic- 
ular emphasis the student has chosen — performance, composition, 
history, or cross-cultural — and the Senior Seminar, which will help 
the student synthesize previous course work, should be taken. The 
final year of the required Listening Repertoire should be mastered. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
MU 050 The Boston College Madrigal Singers (Fall/Spring: 0) 

Women's a cappella choral ensemble specializing in madrigal 
music — music in two to six parts with just a few voices on each part. 
We sometimes branch out and do other kinds of repertoire. 
Rehearsals once a week on Tuesdays, auditions in the spring and fall, 
three or four concerts per year. For more information or to find out 
about auditions, contact the conductor, Jean Meltaus, through the 
Music Department secretary Pattie Longbottom, Lyons 407, 617- 
552-8720. 
Jean Meltaus 



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MU 066 Introduction to Music (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

This course will attempt to develop essential and critical listen- 
ing faculties by employing a chronological survey of the elements, 
forms, and various types of music that the serious listener is exposed 
to today. The principal emphasis of the course will be on tradition- 
al Western art music from medieval Gregorian Chant to 20th cen- 
tury electronic music but certain excursions into the world of non- 
Western musics, jazz, and American popular song will be included 
to diversify and enrich the experience of listening critically to music. 
T. Frank Kennedy, S.J. 
Jeremiah McGrann 

MU 070 Fundamentals of Music Theory (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Arts Core Requirement 

An introductory music theory course designed for students with 
a strong interest in music. As a Core course it includes speculations 
on how musical discourse informs our perception and understanding 
of the world around us. Students learn to acquire skills in music nota- 
tion and transcription. The following theoretical concepts will be 
extensively covered: notation of pitch and rhythm, scales, intervals, 
chords, and harmonic progression. Students leave the course prepared 
for upper level study in music theory and will begin to question 
broader issues concerning the meaning and use of music. 
Margaret McAllister 
Sandra Hebert 
Michael Burgo 
Ralf Gawlick 

MU 071 Irish Dancing/ Advanced Beginner (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Fulfills performance requirement 

World-renowned Irish dance instructor/choreographer Michael 
Smith will offer Irish dance classes focusing on the traditional ceili 
dances of Ireland. Emphasis on the basic steps needed to execute ceili 
dances and demonstration of couple dancing will be the primary 
concentration of this class. 
Michael Smith 

MU 072 Irish Dancing/Advanced (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Fulfills performance requirement 

World-renowned Irish dance instructor/choreographer Michael 
Smith will offer Irish dance classes focusing on the traditional ceili 
dances of Ireland. Emphasis on the basic steps needed to execute ceili 
dances and demonstration of couple dancing will be the primary 
concentration of this class. 
Michael Smith 

MU 073 Irish Dancing/Beginner (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Performance Course 
No prior experience necessary. 

World-renowned Irish dance instructor/choreographer Michael 
Smith will offer Irish dance classes focusing on the traditional ceili 
dances of Ireland. Emphasis on the basic steps needed to execute ceili 
dances and demonstration of couple dancing will be the primary 
concentration of this class. 
Michael Smith 

MU 076 The Boston College Symphony Orchestra (Fall/Spring: 0) 
Prerequisite: Audition required 
Performance Course 

The orchestra gives three full concerts each year plus the annu- 
al Messiah Sing in December At various times the orchestra per- 
forms with the B.C. Chorale and accompanies musical productions 
in association with the Theatre Department. Recent programs have 
included Brahms' Academic Festival Overture, Saint-Saens Organ 
Symphony and Beethoven's Triple Concerto featuring faculty soloists. 



Students vie for solo opportunities in the annual Concerto/Aria 
Competition offered by the orchestra. Membership is by audition 
only. From one to three credits will be awarded for regular partici- 
pation in the Boston College Symphony Orchestra during a stu- 
dent's career at BC. 
John Finney 

MU 077 Chamber Music Ensembles (Fall/Spring: 0) 
Satisfies music major requirement for ensemble performance. No fee. 

Regular participation and coaching in chamber ensembles. The 
course is offered without credit and is open to any qualified student. 
It will fulfill the music major requirement for ensemble performance. 
Sandra Hebert 

MU 078 Traditional Irish Fiddle Class (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Performance Course. 
No fee. 
No prior experience required. 

A study of traditional Irish Fiddle music incorporating styles, 
technique, bowings, fingerings, and ornamentation. Learn to read 
and play the airs and dance music of Ireland along with the music of 
seventeenth and eighteenth century Ireland, that of the ancient 
Bardic harpers and court musicians. Classes are taught at two levels, 
beginners and intermediate by Seamus Connolly, (one of the world's 
leading, Irish traditional musicians and 10 times the Irish National 
Fiddle Champion), and by Laurel Martin, another well-known and 
respected Irish fiddle player and teacher Violin rentals are possible. 
A small tape recorder is required. 
Seamus Connolly 
Laurel Martin 

MU 079 Popular Styles Ensemble (Fall/Spring: 0) 
Performance Course. 
No fee. 

Regular participation and coaching in jazz, rock, and fusion styles 
in small group sessions. Any appropriate instruments are welcome. 
Eric Kniffen 

MU 081 Ear Training/Sight-Singing Lab (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Performance Course for music majors. 

A twice-weekly opportunity to develop the skills of sight- 
singing and ear-training for students who are taking theory or other 
music courses or who are in singing groups and wish to improve 
their skills. Students will learn to sing melodies onsight by drilling 
scales and intervals. Ear-training will focus on melodic, rhythmic 
and harmonic dictation. Highly recommended for students taking 
Fundamentals of Music and Tonal Harmony. 
Michael Burgo 

MU 082 Advanced Ear Training/Sight-Singing Lab (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Performance Course 

A continuation of MU 081. 
Michael Burgo 

MU 083 Introduction to Improvisation (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Performance Course 
This course may be repeated for credit. 

Improvisation is a central feature of many Western musical 
styles. This course offers students the opportunity to learn how to 
improvise in jazz, blues and rock. In a hands-on manner, students 
are introduced to the fundamental concepts of improvising. No 
prior experience is necessary, and there is no prerequisite, but you 
should have at least some experience playing an instrument or 
singing. In addition to extensive in-class performance, accompani- 
ment recordings are provided for practice outside class. 
Erik Knijfen 



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MU 084 Intermediate Improvisation (Fall/Spring: 1) 

Prerequisite: MU 083 or permission of instructor and previous or 

concurrent enrollment in MU 070 

Performance Course 

This course may be repeated for credit. 

This course focuses, in a hands-on manner, on three elements 
of improvisational skill in jazz, blues and rock as it advances from the 
basic concepts of improvisation introduced in Introduction to 
Improvisation. The course embraces different styles of improvisa- 
tional music and directs attention to recognizing and responding to 
these styles in performance situations. 
Erik Kniffen 

MU 085 The Boston College Flute Choir (Fail/Spring: 0) 
Performance Course 

An ensemble devoted solely to music for multiple flutes. Meets 
once a week with a coach. Public performances at B.C. and in the 
community. 
Judith Grant-Duce 

MU 086 Advanced Improvisation (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Prerequisite: MU 084 or permission of instructor and previous or 
concurrent enrollment in MU 110 
Performance Course 
This course may be repeated for credit. 

This course offers the advanced improvisor the opportunity to 
build higher order skills of improvisation in the jazz and rock 
idioms. While the course entails extensive instruction in music the- 
ory, the focus is on application of theoretical concepts to real-world 
improvisational contexts. The course outlines advanced concepts in 
melody-shaping, form/harmony, and musical style. 
Erik Knijfen 

MU 087 Tin Whistle (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Performance Course. No fee. 
No prior experience required. 

Learn to play the tin whistle. Learn to read and play the airs and 
dance music of Ireland. Classes are taught at beginners and intermedi- 
ate levels by Jimmy Noonan, a well-known, respected Irish tin whisde 
and flute player and teacher Generation D type tin whisdes are available 
for purchase locally at a nominal cost. A small tape recorder is required. 
Jimmy Noonan 

MU 090 Boston College Concert Band (Fall/Spring: 0) 
No audition required 

The BC Concert Band draws its membership from the greater 
Boston College community. Undergraduate students, graduate stu- 
dents, staff, faculty and alumni participate in this unique ensemble. 
The Concert Band performs standard concert band repertoire as well 
as marches, Broadway and film music, and some popular music. The 
Concert Band presents a Christmas concert, a winter concert, and a 
spring concert each year. The Concert Band also performs combined 
concerts with other university bands. 
Sebastian Bonaiuto, Conductor 
MU 092 B.C. bOp! (Fall/Spring: 0) 
Audition required 

B.C. bOp! is an ensemble dedicated to the highest levels of 
instrumental and vocal jazz performance. Membership is deter- 
mined by audition. Instrumentation for B.C. bOp! consists of five 
saxophones, five trumpets, four trombones, piano, guitar, bass, 
drums, auxiliary percussion and a vocal ensemble of four to six 
mixed voices. B.C. bOp! performs jazz and popular music from the 
1940's to the 1990's, and appeals to a wide range of musical tastes. 
Sebastian Bonaiuto, Conductor 
Jojo David, Vocal Director 



MU 095 Wind and Percussion Chamber Ensemble (Fall/Spring: 0) 

David Healey 

Paul Cavern 

MU 096 Gospel Workshop (Fall/Spring: 1) 

Cross listed with BK 290 

Performance Course 

No experience is required for membership, but a voice placement 

test is given to each student. 

See course description in the Black Studies Department. 
Hubert Walters 

MU 098 Intro to Voice Performance (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Tutorial fee required 
Performance Course 

Emphasis is on individual coaching and training in developing 
vocal qualities for performance. 
Hanni Myers 

MU 099 Individual Instrumental/Vocal Instruction (Fall/Spring: 1) 
Tutorial fee required. Performance Course. 

Weekly private lessons will be awarded a single credit with 
approval of the Department Chairperson. A maximum of three cred- 
its may be received for lessons. Lessons must be arranged through 
the Music Department before the end of the drop/add period. Music 
majors taking private instruction for credit will perform for a jury of 
faculty members at the end of each semester 
The Department 

MU 100 Individual Instrumental/Vocal Instruction (Fall/Spring: 0) 
Performance Course 
Tutorial fee required depending on the length of the lesson. 

This course consists of weekly private lessons on an instrument 
or in voice or composition for 60, 45, or 30 minutes. Lessons must 
be arranged through the Music Department before the end of the 
drop/add period. 
The Department 

MU 101-102 Individual Vocal/Instrumental Instruction 
(Fall/Spring: 0) 
T Frank Kennedy, S.J. 
MU 110 Harmony (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MU 070 or permission of Department 
Corequisite: (for Music Majors) MU 081 
Theory Course 

Harmony will cover the principles of diatonic harmonic pro- 
gression, four-part writing from a figured bass, and harmonization 
of chorale melodies. We will increase our vocabulary to include 
modes and seventh chords, and continue to develop skills in analy- 
sis, keyboard harmony, and ear-training. 
Sandra Hebert 
Thomas Oboe Lee 
Margaret McAllister 
Ralf Gawlick 
MU 175 Music in the Holocaust and the Third Reich (Spring: 3) 

This course surveys the history and music of composers target- 
ed by the Nazis. We will study the variety of musical styles occurring 
in the classical music, jazz, and cabaret banned and labeled as degen- 
erate by the Nazis. A special focus will be placed on the art and 
music created in the Theresienstadt concentration camp. Some of 
the themes that will be explored throughout the course include: the 
effects of political/intellectual climate of intolerance and persecution 
on artistic expression; art as propaganda; censorship; music and art 
as acts of resistance. 
Mark Ludwig 



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MU 203 Music of the Baroque (Fall: 3) 
Historical Period 

This course includes music in the 1 7th and first half of the 
18th centuries; from Monteverdi and Schutz to Bach and Handel. 
We will study the rise of new forms and growth of instrumental and 
vocal music: opera, oratorio, cantata, trio sonata, solo sonata, con- 
certo, concerto grosso, dance suite, fugue. 
T. Frank Kennedy, S.J. 
MU 206 Opera (Fall: 3) 
Genre Course 

In this course we will look at how text and music combine to 
relate a drama, concentrating on five representative masters of the 
17th through 19th centuries — Monteverdi, Handel, Mozart, Verdi, 
and Wagner. This course will take excursions into other works — the 
operas created for the court of Louis XIV, the vocal pyrotechnics of 
the Italian golden age of singing, the spectacle of French grand 
opera, and the operatic qualities of the modern Broadway musical. 
Jeremiah McGrann 

MU 207 Music of the Romantic Era (Spring: 3) 
Historical Course 

A study of the new concepts, genres, and musical institutions 
that grew up in the 1 9th century, as exemplified by such composers 
as Schubert, Schumann, Mendelssohn, Berlioz, Chopin, Liszt, 
Wagner, Brahms, and Mahler. 
Jeremiah McGrann 

MU 209 Music of the Twentieth Century (Fall: 3) 
Historical Period 

This is a study of the music of the 20th century, including con- 
cepts, ideas, techniques, compositional materials, analytical princi- 
ples of the music, as well as a historical, chronological survey of the 
composers and compositions of the modern era. The course will 
include a study of the 20th century masters Debussy, Ravel, 
Stravinsky, and Schoenberg, as well as nationalist composers like 
Bartok, Britten and Copland, and the flowering of avant-garde 
music since 1945, including electronic music. A discussion of the 
development of Jazz and American Popular Song will be included. 
Ralf Gawlick 

MU 211 Chromatic Harmony (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MU 110 
Theory Course 

This course will cover the basic principles of chromatic pro- 
gression. Continuing the format of four-part writing from a figured 
bass, we will incorporate secondary dominants, diminished seventh 
chords, augmented triads, Neapolitan sixth and augmented sixth 
chords. The concepts of modulation and modal exchange will be 
covered; and studies in keyboard harmony, ear-training, and analysis 
will be continued. We will study the works of great composers 
including Bach, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Schubert, Schumann, 
Chopin, Brahms, Wolf Mahler, and Wagner 
Thomas Oboe Lee 

MU 212 Orchestration (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MU 070 or permission of the instructor 
Theory Course 

The study of the instruments of the symphony orchestra, their 
character, timbre and range. Students will be exposed to a wide vari- 
ety of orchestral music and will learn how instrumental color and 
texture contribute to the compositional process. Original composi- 
tion will not be required; students will arrange music for varied 
instrumental combinations. 
varet McAllister 



MU 215 Jazz Harmony, Improvisation, and Arranging (Fall: 3) 

Prerequisite: MU 1 1 

Theory Course 

Students should have basic keyboard skills, but it is not essential. 

Students should have basic keyboard skills, but this is not 
essential. This course will concentrate on the study of chord struc- 
tures, chord substitutions, chord scales and improvisation as they 
have been codified by contemporary jazz musicians. The technical 
innovations in the music of Sonny Rollins, Thelonius Monk, 
Charlie Parker, Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter, and Miles Davis 
will be analyzed and discussed. Special attention will be placed on 
arranging and composition, including the following: the piano lead 
sheet, writing for horns in a jazz ensemble, re-harmonizing of stan- 
dards, composing original melodies on chord structures of tunes by 
Berlin, Kern, Gershwin, rhythm changes, and the blues. 
Thomas Oboe Lee 
MU 270 Beethoven (Spring: 3) 
Composers 

An introduction to Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827), trac- 
ing his intellectual development within the culture and society of the 
Rhenish Enlightenment, his musical enrichment of the High 
Classicism of Mozart and Haydn (among others), and the heroic style 
of his best known works, to his feelings and expressions of musical 
and social isolation in his last years, and his problematic identity with 
the burgeoning romantic movement in Germany. Emphasis will be 
on the music itself, concentrating on compositions from three genres: 
piano sonata, string quartet, and symphony. Also covered will be the 
concerto, his opera Fidelia, and the Missa Solemnis. 
Jeremiah McGrann 

MU 301 Introduction to World Music (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 
Cross-Cultural Course 

This course will select several world musics and examine them 
in detail. Among those to be surveyed will be North African and 
Middle Eastern music, Klezmar music. Eastern European folk music 
and American Bluegrass. Throughout these examinations some com- 
mon questions will be addressed: what does music mean in these cul- 
tures? Does a Western concept of music differ? How can we under- 
stand these musics in a meaningful way? 
MU 312 Counterpoint I (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisite: MU 1 1 
Theory Course 

In this course we will study the fundamentals of two and three- 
part polyphonic styles. Using the principles of species counterpoint, 
we will acquire a dependable contrapuntal technique to write short 
compositions first in two parts and eventually in three. Assignments 
will include short works in free imitation, strict canon and invertible 
counterpoint. Our studies will include a brief survey of the histori- 
cal origins of Western polyphony, and analysis of contrapuntal com- 
positions of the Baroque period. 
Thomas Oboe Lee 
Margaret McAllister 

MU 315 Seminar in Composition (Spring: 3) 
Prerequisites: MU 110, MU 215 or MU 312 
Theory Course 

The course will be conducted in two parts. One: the class will 
meet as a group once a month. Works in both tonal and 20th centu- 
ry idioms will be discussed and used as models for student composi- 
tions. Two: each student will meet once a week with the instructor for 
a private studio composition lesson. The student will complete, by 
the end of the semester, three original compositions: theme and vari- 



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ations, a movement for string quartet and a song cycle for voice and 

piano. The purchase of Finale, a music software created by Coda 

Music Technology, Mac or PC version, is required for this course. 

Thomas Oboe Lee 

MU 321 Rhythm and Blues in American Music (Fall: 3) 

Cross listed with BK 266 

Cross-Cultural Course 

See course description in the Black Studies Department. 
Hubert Walters 

MU 322 Jazz in America (Spring: 3) 
Cross listed with BK 285 
Cross-Cultural Course 

See course description in the Black Studies Department. 
Hubert Walters 

MU 325 Musics of the Mediterranean (Spring: 3) 
Satisfies Cultural Diversity Core Requirement 

The Mediterranean region has long been a providing ground 
for both anthropological and ethnomusicological theories about the 
ways in which societies organize and define themselves through 
music. Music of the Mediterranean will investigate the role of music 
in this hotly contested area. From the relationship of the early 
Church to other world systems of religion (Islam and Judaism), 
through the birth of the European nation-state, to twentieth-and 
twenty-first century popular and political song, students will be 
asked to look at music as a crucial element in emic and etic defini- 
tion of life histories and collaborations. 
MU 400 Readings and Research (Fall/Spring: 3) 
The Department 

MU 403 Honors Thesis Preparation (Fall/Spring: 3) 
77 Frank Kennedy, S.J. 
MU 404 Music Internship (Fall: 1) 
T Frank Kennedy, S.J. 
MU 405 Senior Seminar (Spring: 3) 

For music majors in their senior year (exception only by special 
permission). Through supervised reading, research, writing, discus- 
sion and performance, this seminar will help majors develop a 
framework for synthesizing their various courses into a coherent 
whole, with special emphasis in the area of strongest interest (theo- 
ry, composition, history, cross-cultural studies, or performance). It 
will also help prepare students for examinations in listening reper- 
toire and ear-training (see major requirements). 
Jeremiah McGrann 

Philosophy 

Faculty 

Richard Murphy, Professor Emeritus; A.B., A.M., Boston College; 

S.T.L., Weston College; Ph.D., Fordham University 

Norman J. Wells, Professor Emeritus; A.B., Boston College; L.M.S., 

Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies; A.M., Ph.D., University of 

Toronto 

James Bernauer, S.J., Professor; A.B., Fordham University; A.M., 

St. Louis University; M.Div., Woodstock College; S.T.M., Union 

Theological Seminary; Ph.D., State University of New York 

Oliva Blanchette, Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston College; S.T.L., 

Weston College; Ph.D., Universite Laval; Ph.L., College St. Albert 

de Louvain 

Patrick Byrne, Professor; B.S., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., New 

York State University 

John J. Cleary, Professor; A.M., University College, Dublin; Ph.D., 

Boston University 



Richard Cobb-Stevens, Professor; Chairperson of the Department; 

A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., University of Paris 

Joseph F. X. Flanagan, S.J., Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston College; 

S.T.L., Weston College; D.D.S., Washington University; Ph.D., 

Fordham University 

Jorge Garcia, Professor; B.A., Fordham University; Ph.D., Yale 

University 

Thomas S. Hibbs, Professor; B.A., M.A., University of Dallas; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Peter J. Kreeft, Professor; A.B., Calvin College; A.M., Ph.D., 

Fordham University 

Arthur R. Madigan, S.J., Professor; A.B., Fordham University; 

A.M., Ph.D., University of Toronto; M.Div., S.T.B., Regis College, 

Toronto 

Thomas J. Owens, Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston College; Ph.D., 

Fordham University 

David M. Rasmussen, Professor; A.B., University of Minnesota; 

B.D., A.M., Ph.D., University of Chicago 

William J. Richardson, S.J., Professor; Ph.L., Woodstock College; 

Th.L., Ph.D., Maitre-Agrege, University of Louvain 

Jacques M. Taminiaux, Adelmann Professor; Doctor Juris, Ph.D., 

Maitre-Agrege, University of Louvain 

Richard Kearney, Visiting Professor; B.A., University of Dublin; 

M.A., McGill University; Ph.D., University of Paris 

Jean-Luc Marion, Visiting Professor; Ph.D., University of Paris 

(Sorbonne) 

Ronald Anderson, S.J., Associate Professor; B.Sc, University of 

Canterbury; Ph.D., University of Melbourne; M.Div., Weston 

School of Theology; Ph.D., Boston University 

Gary Gurtler, S.J., Associate Professor; B.A., St. John Fisher 

College; M.A., Ph.D., Fordham University; M.Div., Weston 

School of Theology 

Stuart B. Martin, Associate Professor; A.B., Sacred Heart College; 

L.M.H., Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies; A.M., Ph.D., 

Fordham University 

Vanessa P. Rumble, Associate Professor; B.A., Mercer University; 

Ph.D., Emory University 

Francis Soo, Associate Professor; A.B., Berchmans College; A.M., 

University of Philippines; B.S.T, Fu-Jen University; A.M., Harvard 

University; Ph.D., Boston College 

Eileen C. Sweeney, Associate Professor; B.A., University of Dallas; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

Ronald K. Tacelli, S.J., Associate Professor; A.B., Boston College; 

M.Div., Weston College; Ph.D., University of Toronto 

Robert C. Miner, Assistant Professor; B.A., Rice University; M.A., 

Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Gerard C. O'Brien, S.J., Assistant Professor; A.B., A.M., Boston 

College; Ph.D., Fordham University 

Ingrid Scheibler, Assistant Professor; B.A., University of Virginia; 

Ph.D., Trinity College, Cambridge 

Brian J. ^tsunan. Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.S., Central 

Michigan University; St.B., Gregorian University, Rome; M.A., 

Gonzaga University; Ph.D., Boston College 

Daniel J. Dwyer, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., University of 

Notre Dame; Ph.D., The Catholic University of America 

Laura Garcia, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., Westmont 

College; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Marina B. McCoy, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., Earlham 

College; M.A., Ph.D., Boston University 

David McMenamin, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., Fordham 

University; M.A., Villanova University; Ph.D., Boston College 



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Arts and Sciences 



Paul McNeills, S.J., Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., Cornell 

University; M.Hum., Fordham University; B.A., Ph.L., Georgian 

University, Rome, Italy; Ph.D., Boston College 

'MoiTa.yi-.'W2Xs\i, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., Brown 

University; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame 

Albert yi.'Sff\MakcT, Adjunct Assistant Professor; B.A., M.A., 

Boston University; Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Andrew J. Peach, Adjunct Lecturer; B.A., Georgetown University; 

M.A., Ph.D., (cand.). The Catholic University of America 

Departmental Notes 

• Department Administrator: Peggy Bakalo, 
617-552-3877, 

• Department Secretary: Rose Marie DeLeo, 
617-552- 3847 

• Department Secretary: Bonnie Waldron, 617-552-3845 

• World Wide Web: http://fmwww.bc.edu/PL/ 

Undergraduate Program Description 

Philosophical study at Boston College provides the opportunity 
for open-ended inquiry and reflection on the most fundamental ques- 
tions about ourselves and our world. The Philosophy department offers 
a broad spectrum of courses in the history of philosophy (ancient, 
medieval, modern, and contemporary), and a special focus on 
Continental Philosophy from Kant to the present. Faculty also teach 
and conduct research in metaphysics, philosophy of science, philoso- 
phy of religion, ethics, and social and political philosophy. In addition 
to these areas of specialization, provision is made for interdisciplinary 
programs. The Philosophy department offers a program of courses 
allowing for concentration in the following specialized areas: Ancient, 
Medieval, Modern, Contemporary American, Contemporary Conti- 
nental, and the philosophies of religion and science. 

Undergraduate students may, with the approval of the 
Chairperson and the individual professor, enroll in certain graduate 
philosophy courses. 

The department offers to qualified students the opportunity to 
do independent research under the direction of a professor. The 
department also participates in the Advanced Independent Research 
Program, details of which are to be found in the Arts and Sciences 
section. 

Undergraduate majors who plan to do graduate work in phi- 
losophy will be prepared more than adequately to meet all require- 
ments of graduate schools. 
Major Requirements 

Working under the guidance of faculty advisors, students are 
encouraged to design a well-balanced program that will give them a 
solid foundation in the history of philosophy and yet allow for devel- 
opment of their major interests. Philosophy majors begin with one 
of the Philosophy Core offerings. 
History of Philosophy (Electives) 

This sequence is intended for students who have completed the 
Core requirement in philosophy and who wish to understand the 
history of Western thought in greater depth. Through study of the 
major thinkers in the history of philosophy, students will have the 
opportunity to develop a critical appreciation for the complexity of 
each philosopher's thought: the influences which have shaped each 
thinker's ethics, metaphysics, and epistemology, and the rich legacy 
which in turn has passed on. Open to both majors and non-majors, 
these courses are recommended especially for those who consider 
pursuing graduate study in philosophy and wish a thorough ground- 
ing in its history. Students are free to take selected courses or the 
sequence in its entirety. 

PL 405 Greek Philosophy 



• PL 406 Modern Philosophy 

• PL 407 Medieval Philosophy 

• PL 408 Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Philosophy 
Philosophy Minor 

The philosophy minor is structured to give students several 
thematic options which correspond to the traditional divisions of 
philosophical inquiry: 

• Ethical and Political Philosophy 

• Aesthetics 

• Philosophy of Religion 

• History and Philosophy of Science 

The department will offer in each of these areas a sequence of 
courses that will build on the foundation of our core courses. Each 
student will design his or her own minor in consultation with a fac- 
ulty advisor. Each program will consist of a coherent blend of 
required and elective courses. With the permission of the instructor 
seniors may participate in some graduate seminars. 
Information for First Year Majors and Non-Majors 

The department offers students three basic options for fulfill- 
ing the University's two-semester Core requirement in Philosophy: 
Core Program, Perspectives Program, PULSE Program. 

Core Programs 

The Core requirement for all undergraduates is six credits in 
Philosophy. The options and the requirements they fulfill are listed 
below: 

PL 070-071 Philosophy of the Person (Fall/Spring) 

This is a two-semester, six-credit course that fulfills the Core 

requirement in Philosophy. 

• PL 281-282 Philosophy of Human Existence 

This is a two-semester, six-credit course that fulfills the Core 
requirement in Philosophy. 

Perspectives Program I-IV 

The Perspectives Program at Boston College is a four-year inter- 
disciplinary program centered upon the great books of the western 
intellectual tradition. It integrates the humanities and natural sciences 
in order to help students work out for themselves a set of coherent 
answers to such questions as the following: Who are we? Where do 
we come from? Where are we going? The Perspectives Program seeks 
(1) to educate the whole person, (2) to help students develop skills in 
practical living and critical thinking, and (3) to form students who 
are intelligent, responsible, reasonable, and attentive. 

Each of the Perspectives courses runs for two-semesters, for 12 
credits. Each is designed to fulfill the Core requirements of the rele- 
vant departments. Perspectives I (Perspectives on Western Culture), 
is open only to Freshman. Perspectives II (Modernism and the Arts), 
Perspectives III (Horizons in the New Social Sciences), and 
Perspectives IV (New Scientific Visions) may be taken at anytime 
while a student is enrolled at Boston College. Descriptions of 
Perspectives II, III and IV are also listed in the University courses 
section of the Catalog. 

None of the courses in the Perspectives sequence is a prerequi- 
site for any of the other courses. 

Perspectives I 

PL 090-091 (TH 090-091) Perspectives on Western Culture 1 

and II (Perspectives 1) 

This two-semester, twelve-credit course fulfills the Core 
requirements in both Philosophy and Theology. For Freshmen 
Only 



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157 



Arts and Sciences 



Perspectives II 

UN 104-105/UN 106-107 Modernism and the Arts I and II 

This two-semester course fulfills the six-credit Philosophy Core 
requirement, the three-credit Literature Core requirement, and the 
three-credit Fine Arts Core requirement. 

Perspectives III 

UN 109-1 10/UN 111-112 Horizons of the New Social Sciences I 

and II 

This two-semester course fulfills the six-credit Philosophy Core 
requirement and the six-credit Social Sciences Core requirement. 

Perspectives IV 

UN 119-120/UN 121-122 New Scientific Visions I and II 

This two-semester course may fulfill the six-credit Philosophy 
Core requirement and either the six-credit Natural Science Core or 
the three-credit Mathematics Core and three-credits of the Natural 
Science Core. 

PULSE Program 

The PULSE Program provides students with the opportunity 
to explore questions of philosophy, theology and other disciplines in 
courses which incorporate field work experience in one of Boston's 
many social service organizations. Through the combination of aca- 
demic reflection and community service, students are provided with 
a framework for understanding the intimate relationship between 
theory and practice. 

In light of classic and contemporary philosophical and theo- 
logical texts, PULSE students address topics such as the relationship 
of self and society, the nature of community, the mystery of suffer- 
ing and the practical difficulties of developing a just society. PULSE 
students are challenged to investigate the insights offered by their 
readings in relation to their service work. 

Most PULSE students are enrolled in the course Person and 
Social Responsibility, which is one of the options for fulfilling the 
Core requirements in philosophy and theology. Several PULSE elec- 
tive course are also offered, including Values in Social Services and 
Health Care, and Boston: An Urban Analysis. 

All PULSE courses require a ten to twelve hour per week com- 
mitment to service. Carefully selected field placements in youth 
work, the correctional system, emergency shelters, AIDS and HIV 
services, legal and community advocacy, and literacy programs 
become the context in which students forge a critical and compas- 
sionate perspective both on society and on themselves. 
Opportunities for field experience are available in a variety of neigh- 
borhoods and institutions. The placements aim at responding to 
community needs while simultaneously providing a challenging 
opportunity for students to confront social problems. 

PULSE provides four levels of direction and supervision for stu- 
dent work: the on-site placement supervisor, faculty member, PULSE 
Council member, and PULSE staff After an initial orientation, the 
on-site supervisor meets regularly with students to provide informa- 
tion, direction, and constructive feedback. The faculty member 
directs the student's academic work in a regularly scheduled class. In 
addition, he or she meets with students weekly in discussion groups 
to consider issues which have presented themselves in the student's 
service work. The PULSE Council member is an upperclass student 
who serves as coordinator, peer advisor, and support person. The 
PULSE Director has overall responsibility for the educational goals 
and interests of the PULSE program. In fulfilling that responsibility, 
the Director and the Assistant to the Director work as consultants 
and advisors for students, placement supervisors, and faculty. 



PL 088-089 (TH 088-089) Person and Social Responsibility I 

This is a two-semester, twelve-credit course that fulfills the 
University's Core requirements in Philosophy and Theology. Must 
be taken prior to senior year. 

Fifth Year B.A./M.A. Program 

Undergraduate philosophy majors may opt to enter a 5-year 
B.A./M.A. program. Application to the program will normally take 
place during the junior year Students admitted to the B.A./M.A. 
program will follow the curriculum for philosophy majors, except 
that two courses taken during the senior year must be eligible for 
graduate credit. These two courses will count toward the M.A. as 
well as the B.A. The remainder of the M.A. may thus be completed 
by taking eight additional graduate courses as well as the Master's 
comprehensive examination and meeting the language requirement 
for Master's students. 

Interested undergraduate philosophy majors must apply to the 
Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Expectations are that such 
applicants will have achieved an overall GPA of at least 3.33 and a 
major GPA of 3.5 or above. 

Graduate Program Description 

The Department of Philosophy offers a strong emphasis on the 
history of philosophy (ancient, medieval, modern, and contempo- 
rary), and a special focus on Continental European philosophy from 
Kant to the present. Faculty also teach and conduct research in meta- 
physics, philosophy of science, philosophy of religion, ethics, aes- 
thetics, and social and political philosophy. Students have consider- 
able flexibility in designing programs of study, and have access to the 
resources of Political Science, Theology, and other departments. 

The department offers a Ph.D. program and a program leading 
to the M.A. All applicants who are native speakers of English must 
submit the results of the Graduate Record Examination. All appli- 
cants who are not native speakers of English must submit the results 
of the TOEFL Examination. Admission to the doctoral program is 
highly selective (5 or 6 admitted each year from over 150 applicants). 
Ph.D. Requirements 

Requirements for the Ph.D. are as follows: 

One year of full-time residence 

Sixteen (16) courses (48 credits) 

Proficiency in logic (tested by course or by examination) 

Proficiency in two foreign languages (Latin, Greek, French or 

German) 

Preliminary comprehensive examination 

Doctoral comprehensive examination 

Dissertation 

Oral defense of the dissertation 

Students entering the program with the M.A. in philosophy 

may be credited with 6 courses (18 credits) toward the Ph.D. 

The preliminary comprehensive is a one hour oral examination 
on a reading list in the history of philosophy and it is to be taken at 
the end of the student's first year. The doctoral comprehensive is a 
two hour oral examination on the student's dissertation proposal, a 
systematic problem, and two major philosophers; it is to be taken by 
November of the student's fourth year (third year, for students enter- 
ing the program with the M.A. degree in hand). 

Doctoral students are generally admitted with financial aid in 
the form of Research Assistantships and Teaching Fellowships. 
Research assistants and teaching fellows receive remission of tuition 
for required courses. Doctoral students generally teach after the first 
year; the program includes a seminar on teaching. Doctoral students 
are expected to pursue the degree on a full-time basis and to maintain 
satisfactory progress toward the completion of degree requirements. 



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Arts and Sciences 



M.A. Requirements 

Requirements for the M.A. are as follows: 

• Ten (10) courses (30 credits) 

• Proficiency in one foreign language (Latin, Greek, French or 
German) 

• One hour oral comprehensive examination on a reading list in 
the history of philosophy. 

It is possible, though not common, for students to write a M.A. 
thesis in place of 2 courses (6 credits). The M.A. may be taken on a 
full-time basis or on a part-time basis. Departmental financial aid 
and tuition remission are not normally available for students seeking 
the M.A. 

Institute of Medieval Philosophy and Theology 

The Department of Philosophy is linked to the Institute of 
Medieval Philosophy and Theology. The Institute is a center that 
unites the teaching and research efforts of faculty members in the 
Philosophy and Theology Departments who specialize in medieval 
philosophy and theology. For more information refer to the Research 
Centers in the "About Boston College" section of the Catalog. 
The Lonergan Center 

Studies related to the work of Jesuit theologian and philosopher 
Bernard Lonergan (1904-1984) are focused in the Lonergan Center 
at Boston College. For more information, refer to the Research 
Centers in the "About Boston College" section of the catalog. 
Electives 

If a desired course is not offered, please consult with the appro- 
priate professor. It may be possible to arrange a Readings and 
Research course on the desired topic. 

Undergraduate Course Offerings 

Note: Future course offerings and courses offered on a periodic 
basis are listed on the World Wide Web at http://www.bc.edu/courses/. 
PL 005 Introduction to Basic Problems in Philosophy 
(Fall/Spring: 4) 
David McMenamin 

PL 070-071 Philosophy of the Person I and II (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Two-semester, six-credit course. Total of three credits each term. 

This course introduces students to philosophical reflection and 
to its history through the presentation and discussion of the writings 
of major thinkers from ancient, medieval, modern, and contempo- 
rary periods. The course is designed to show how fundamental and 
enduring questions about the universe and about human beings 
recur in different historical contexts. Emphasis is given to ethical 
themes, such as the nature of the human person, the foundation of 
human rights and corresponding responsibilities, and problems of 
social justice. 
The Department 

PL 088-089 Person and Social Responsibility (Fall/Spring: 3) 
Corequisite: TH 088-098 

Two-semester, twelve-credit course. Total of six credits each term. 
Satisfies Philosophy and Theology Core requirements 
Enrollment limited to freshman, sophomores, and juniors. 

The course requirements include ten to twelve hours per week 
of community service. In light of classic philosophical and theologi- 
cal texts, students in this course address the relationship of self and 
society, the nature of community, the mystery of suffering and the 
practical difficulties of developing a just society. PULSE students are 
challenged to investigate the insights offered by their readings in 
relationship to their service work. Places in the course are very lim- 
ited and are allocated on a first come, first served basis. 
T